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150 Advanced Greek Words to Expand Your Vocabulary

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Ready to take your Greek to the next level?

If you’re an advanced Greek learner, you might have wondered at times about the Greek equivalents of words belonging to specific terminologies. In this article, we have gathered 150 advanced Greek words in the academic, business, medical, and legal sectors, along with examples of their use.

Moreover, we have also included a few sophisticated verbs, adverbs, and adjectives to use in place of their simpler counterparts. These words will really make a difference in your writing! 

If you haven’t done so already, please check out our articles on beginner words and intermediate words, too.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Advanced Academic Words
  2. Advanced Business Words
  3. Advanced Medical Words
  4. Advanced Legal Words
  5. Other Advanced Words
  6. How can GreekPod101.com help you learn Greek?

1. Advanced Academic Words

A Woman Paying Attention in Class

The first set of advanced Greek vocabulary we’ll look at consists of words used in the academic world. These are words you would find used in university essays or class presentations, for example. 

1Greek: μελέτη
Romanization: meléti
Translation: “study”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Αυτή η μελέτη έχει δημοσιευθεί ως άρθρο σε επιστημονικό περιοδικό.

Romanization: Aftí i meléti éhi dimosiefthí os árthro se epistimonikó periodikó.

Translation: “This study has been published as a paper in an academic journal.”
2Greek: (επιστημονικό) άρθρο
Romanization: (epistimonikó) árthro
Translation: “(academic) paper”

Part of speech: Noun
3Greek: επιστημονικό περιοδικό
Romanization: epistimonikó periodikó
Translation: “academic journal”

Part of speech: Noun

4Greek: έρευνα
Romanization: érevna
Translation: “research”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Η αξιολόγηση αυτής της έρευνας έδειξε ότι τα συμπεράσματα είναι ασαφή.

Romanization: I axiolóyisi aftís tis érevnas édixe óti ta simberázmata íne asafí. 

Translation: “The assessment of this research showed that the conclusions are vague.”
5Greek: αξιολόγηση
Romanization: axiolóyisi
Translation: “assessment”

Part of speech: Noun
6Greek: ασαφής
Romanization: asafís
Translation: “ambiguous” / “vague” / “unclear”

Part of speech: Adjective

.

7Greek: διατριβή
Romanization: diatriví
Translation: “dissertation” / “thesis”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Ο καθηγητής μου υπέδειξε μερικές διορθώσεις, έτσι ώστε να γίνει η διατριβή μου πιο σαφής.

Romanization: O kathiyitís mu ipédixe merikés diorthósis, étsi óste na yíni i diatriví mu pio safís.

Translation: “My professor suggested a few corrections to make my thesis more clear.”
8Greek: σαφής
Romanization: safís
Translation: “clear”

Part of speech: Adjective

.

9Greek: ποσοτική ανάλυση
Romanization: posotikí análisi
Translation: “quantitative analysis”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Μια έρευνα μπορεί να χρησιμοποιεί είτε ποσοτική ανάλυση, είτε ποιοτική ανάλυση για να εξάγει συμπεράσματα.

Romanization: Mia érevna borí na hrisimopií íte posotikí análisi, íte piotikí análisi ya na exáyi siberázmata.  

Translation: “A research study may make use of either quantitative analysis or qualitative analysis in order to draw conclusions.”
10Greek: ποιοτική ανάλυση
Romanization: piotikí análisi
Translation: “qualitative analysis”

Part of speech: Noun
11Greek: συμπεράσματα
Romanization: siberázmata
Translation: “conclusions”

Part of speech: Noun

.

12Greek: σύγγραμμα
Romanization: síngrama
Translation: “writing”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Αυτό το σύγγραμμα υποστηρίζει τους ισχυρισμούς μέσω στατιστικής ανάλυσης των δεδομένων.

Romanization: Aftó to síngrama ipostirízi tus ishirismús méso statistikís análisis ton dedoménon.

Translation: “This writing supports the claims through statistical analysis of the data.”
13Greek: δεδομένα
Romanization: dedoména
Translation: “data”

Part of speech: Noun
14Greek: στατιστική ανάλυση
Romanization: statistikí análisi
Translation: “statistical analysis”

Part of speech: Noun

15Greek: συγκριτική ανάλυση
Romanization: sigkritikí análisi
Translation: “comparative analysis”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Μια συγκριτική ανάλυση στοχεύει στην ανακάλυψη επαναλαμβανόμενων μοτίβων και ευρημάτωνμεταξύ των ευρημάτων παλαιότερων ερευνών.

Romanization: Mia singritikí análisi stohévi stin anakálipsi epanalamvanómenon motívon ke sishetíseon metaxí ton evrimáton paleóteron erevnón.

Translation: “A comparative analysis aims to discover repetitive patterns and correlations between the findings of older research.” 
16Greek: εύρημα
Romanization: évrima
Translation: “finding”

Part of speech: Noun
17Greek: συσχέτιση
Romanization: sishétisi
Translation: “correlation”

Part of speech: Noun

18Greek: ένδειξη
Romanization: éndixi
Translation: “indication”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Μια υπόθεση βασίζεται σε ενδείξεις, ενώ ένα αποτέλεσμα σε αποδείξεις.

Romanization: Mia ipóthesi vasízete se endíxis, enó éna apotélezma se apodíxis.

Translation: “A hypothesis is based on indications, while a result is based on evidence.” 
19Greek: υπόθεση
Romanization: ipóthesi
Translation: “hypothesis”

Part of speech: Noun
20Greek: απόδειξη
Romanization: apódixi
Translation: “evidence”

Part of speech: Noun

21Greek: αντιπαραβολή
Romanization: andiparavolí
Translation: “comparison”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Σε αντιπαραβολή με προηγούμενες μελέτες, η πλειονότητα των συμμετεχόντων συμφωνεί, ενώ η μειονότητα διαφωνεί.

Romanization: Se andiparavolí me proigúmenes melétes, i plionótita ton simetehóndon simfoní, enó i mionótita diafoní. 

Translation: “In comparison with earlier studies, the majority of participants agrees, whereas the minority disagrees.”
22Greek: πλειονότητα
Romanization: plionótita
Translation: “majority”

Part of speech: Noun
23Greek: μειονότητα
Romanization: mionótita
Translation: “minority”

Part of speech: Noun

24Greek: εξέταση
Romanization: exétasi
Translation: “examination”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Η προθεσμία για να δηλώσεις συμμετοχή στην εξέταση λήγει σήμερα.

Romanization: I prothesmía ya na dilósis simetohí stin exétasi líyi símera.

Translation: “The deadline to register for the examination expires today.”
25Greek: προθεσμία
Romanization: prothesmía
Translation: “deadline”

Part of speech: Noun

2. Advanced Business Words

A Businessman Shaking Hands with a Business Partner

Now that you’re at an advanced level in Greek, you might be thinking about getting a job in Greece or doing business here. If that’s the case, you’ll want to have these business terms up your sleeve. 

26Greek: επιχειρηματικότητα
Romanization: epihirimatikótita
Translation: “entrepreneurship”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Η επιχειρηματικότητα χρειάζεται όραμα και στρατηγική.

Romanization: I epihirimatikótita hriázete órama ke stratiyikí.

Translation: “Entrepreneurship needs a vision and a strategy.”
27Greek: όραμα
Romanization: órama
Translation: “vision”

Part of speech: Noun
28Greek: στρατηγική
Romanization: stratiyikí
Translation: “strategy”

Part of speech: Noun

29Greek:
επιχειρηματίας
Romanization: epihirimatías
Translation: “entrepreneur” / “businessman” / “businesswoman”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Τα τελευταία χρόνια, όλο και περισσότεροι επιχειρηματίες στρέφονται προς την καινοτομία.

Romanization: Ta telftéa hrónia, ólo ke perisóteri epihirimatíes stréfonde pros tin kenotomía.

Translation: “Over the past few years, more and more entrepreneurs turn to innovation.”
30Greek: καινοτομία
Romanization: kenotomía
Translation: “innovation”

Part of speech: Noun

31Greek: προσφορά
Romanization: prosforá
Translation: “offer” / “supply”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Η τιμή ενός προϊόντος καθορίζεται από την προσφορά και τη ζήτηση.

Romanization: I timí enós proióndos kathorízete apó tin prosforá ke ti zítisi.

Translation: “The price of a product is determined by supply and demand.”
32Greek: ζήτηση
Romanization: zítisi
Translation: “demand”

Part of speech: Noun

33Greek: κέρδος
Romanization: kérdos
Translation: “profit”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Στο τέλος κάθε έτους φαίνεται εάν μια εταιρεία έχει κέρδος ή ζημία.

Romanization: Sto télos káthe étus fénete eán mia etería éhi kérdos í zimía.

Translation: “At the end of each year, it is shown whether a company has made a profit or had losses.”
34Greek: ζημία
Romanization: zimía
Translation: “loss”

Part of speech: Noun

35Greek: μετοχή
Romanization: metohí
Translation: “share”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Ένας μέτοχος είναι ο ιδιοκτήτης μιας μετοχής μιας εταιρείας.

Romanization: Énas métohos íne o idioktítis mias metohís mias eterías.

Translation: “A shareholder is the owner of a share of a company.”
36Greek: μέτοχος
Romanization: métohos
Translation: “shareholder”

Part of speech: Noun

37Greek: χρέωση
Romanization: hréosi
Translation: “charge”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Όταν κάνετε αγορές, γίνεται χρέωση του λογαριασμού σας, ενώ, όταν σας επιστρέφουν χρήματα, γίνεται πίστωση του λογαριασμού σας. 

Romanization: Ótan kánete agorés, yínete hréosi tu logariasmú sas, enó ótan sas epistréfun hrímata yínete pístosi tu logariasmú sas.

Translation: “When you make purchases, your account gets charged, whereas when you get refunded, your account gets credited.”
38Greek: πίστωση
Romanization: pístosi
Translation: “credit”

Part of speech: Noun

39Greek: λιανική
Romanization: lianikí
Translation: “retail”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Για αγορές λιανικής θα πρέπει να ζητήσετε απόδειξη, ενώ για αγορές χονδρικής θα πρέπει να ζητήσετε τιμολόγιο.

Romanization: Ya agorés lianikís tha prépi na zitísete apódixi, enó ya agorés hondrikís tha prépi na zitísete timolóyio.

Translation: “For retail, you should ask for a receipt, whereas for wholesale you should ask for an invoice.”
40Greek: χονδρική
Romanization: hondrikí
Translation: “wholesale”

Part of speech: Noun
41Greek: απόδειξη
Romanization: apódixi
Translation: “receipt”

Part of speech: Noun
42Greek: τιμολόγιο
Romanization: timolóyio
Translation: “invoice”

Part of speech: Noun

43Greek: οργανισμός
Romanization: organizmós
Translation: “organization”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Ένας οργανισμός απαρτίζεται από τον διευθυντή, τα στελέχη και τους υπαλλήλους.

Romanization: Énas organizmós apartízete apó ton diefthindí, ta steléhi ke tus ipalílus.

Translation: “An organization consists of the manager, the executives, and the employees.”
44Greek: στέλεχος
Romanization: stélehos
Translation: “executive”

Part of speech: Noun
45Greek: διευθυντής
Romanization: diefthindís
Translation: “manager”

Part of speech: Noun
46Greek: υπάλληλος
Romanization: ipálilos
Translation: “employee”

Part of speech: Noun

47Greek: ισολογισμός
Romanization: isoloyizmós
Translation: “balance (sheet)”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Ένας ισολογισμός περιλαμβάνει το ενεργητικό και το παθητικό.

Romanization: Énas isoloyizmós perilamváni to eneryitikó ke to pathitikó.

Translation: “A balance sheet includes the assets and liabilities.”
48Greek: ενεργητικό
Romanization: eneryitikó
Translation: “assets”

Part of speech: Noun
49Greek: παθητικό
Romanization: pathitikó
Translation: “liabilities”

Part of speech: Noun

50Greek: εργοδότης
Romanization: ergodótis
Translation: “employer”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Ο εργοδότης είναι ο ιδιοκτήτης της επιχείρησης.

Romanization: O ergodótis íne o idioktítis tis epihírisis.

Translation: “The employer is the owner of the business.”

3. Advanced Medical Words

A Surgeon Operating on a Patient

You might be surprised by how many Greek words you already know

Take medical specialities, for instance, where most of the words used in English are of Greek roots. Let’s take a look at the Greek terms for some of the most common medical specialties. 

51Greek: παθολογία
Romanization: patholoyía
Translation: “pathology”
57Greek: οφθαλμολογíα
Romanization: ofthalmoloyía
Translation: “ophthalmology”
63Greek: ωτορινολαρυγγολογία
Romanization: otorinolaringoloyía
Translation: “otorhinolaryngology”
52Greek: ορθοπεδική
Romanization: orthopedikí
Translation: “orthopedics”
58Greek: γαστρεντερολογία
Romanization: gastrenseroloyía
Translation: “gastroenterology”
64Greek: αναισθησιολογία
Romanization: anesthisioloyía
Translation: “anesthesiology”
53Greek: γυναικολογία
Romanization: yinekoloyía
Translation: “gynecology”
59Greek: καρδιολογία
Romanization: kardioloyía
Translation: “cardiology”
65Greek: ενδοκρινολογία
Romanization: endokrinoloyía
Translation: “endocrinology”
54Greek: νευρολογία
Romanization: nevroloyía
Translation: “neurology”
60Greek: ογκολογία
Romanization: ongoloyía
Translation: “oncology”
66Greek: παιδιατρική
Romanization: pediatrikí
Translation: “pediatrics”
55Greek: ψυχιατρική
Romanization: psihiatrikí
Translation: “psychiatry”
61Greek: οδοντιατρική
Romanization: odondiatrikí
Translation: “dentistry”
67Greek: φυσιοθεραπεία
Romanization: fisiotherapía
Translation: “physiotherapy”
56Greek: διαιτολογία
Romanization: dietoloyía
Translation: “dietology”
62Greek: δερματολογία
Romanization: dermatoloyía
Translation: “dermatology”
68Greek: πνευμονολογία
Romanization: pnevmonoloyía
Translation: “pneumonology”

However, there are plenty of other medical-related words, which will be presented below along with some examples of their use. 

69Greek: εγχείρηση
Romanization: enhírisi
Translation: “operation”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Ο χειρουργός ολοκλήρωσε την εγχείρηση σε πέντε ώρες. 

Romanization: O hirurgós oloklírose tin enhírisi se pénde óres.

Translation: “The surgeon completed the operation in five hours.”
70Greek: χειρουργός
Romanization: hirurgós
Translation: “surgeon”

Part of speech: Noun

71Greek: διάγνωση
Romanization: diágnosi
Translation: “diagnosis”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Δυστυχώς, η διάγνωση για τον πατέρα μου ήταν άνοια.

Romanization: Distihós, i diágnosi ya ton patéra mu ítan ánia.  

Translation: “Unfortunately, the diagnosis for my father was dementia.”
72Greek: άνοια
Romanization: ánia
Translation: “dementia”

Part of speech: Noun

73Greek: αξονική τομογραφία
Romanization: axonikí tomografía
Translation: “CT scan”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Ένας γιατρός μπορεί να σου ζητήσει να κάνεις μια αξονική τομογραφία ή μια μαγνητική τομογραφία, πριν βγάλει συμπεράσματα.

Romanization: Énas yatrós borí na su zitísi na kánis mia axonikí tomografía í mia magnitikí tomografía, prin vgáli siberásmata.

Translation: “A doctor may ask you to do a CT scan or an MRI scan before jumping to conclusions.”
74Greek: μαγνητική τομογραφία
Romanization: magnitikí tomografía
Translation: “MRI scan”

Part of speech: Noun

75Greek: λοίμωξη
Romanization: límoxi
Translation: “infection”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Πέρσι υπέφερα από μια επίμονη λοίμωξη και από ένα κάταγμα στο πόδι μου.

Romanization: Pérsi ipéfera apó mia epíponi límoxi ke apó éna kátagma sto pódi mu. 

Translation: “Last year, I was suffering from a persistent infection and from a fracture in my leg.”
76Greek: κάταγμα
Romanization: kátagma
Translation: “fracture”

Part of speech: Noun

4. Advanced Legal Words

A Judge’s Gavel and a Judge Reading a Piece of Paper

Whether you plan to study law in Greece, enjoy keeping up with world news, or want to avoid any serious misunderstandings, these advanced Greek words related to the legal system will come in handy. 

77Greek: δικαστής
Romanization: dikastís
Translation: “judge”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Ο δικαστής έχει πάντα τον πρώτο λόγο σε ένα δικαστήριο.

Romanization: O dikastís éhi pánda ton próto lógo se éna dikastírio.

Translation: “The judge always has the first say in a courthouse.”
78Greek: δικαστήριο
Romanization: dikastírio
Translation: “courthouse”

Part of speech: Noun

79Greek: δίκη
Romanization: díki
Translation: “trial”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Κατά τη διάρκεια της δίκης, ο εισαγγελέας έθεσε μερικές ερωτήσεις.

Romanization: Katá ti diárkia tis díkis, o isangeléas éthese merikés erotísis.
Translation: “During the trial, the prosecutor posed a few questions.”
80Greek: εισαγγελέας
Romanization: isagkeléas

Translation: “prosecutor”

Part of speech: Noun

81Greek: ποινικό αδίκημα
Romanization: pinikó adíkima
Translation: “criminal offense”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Η ανώτατη ποινή για ένα ποινικό αδίκημα είναι η ισόβια κάθειρξη.

Romanization: I anótati piní ya éna pinikó adíkima íne i isóvia káthirxi.

Translation: “The maximum penalty for a criminal offense is life imprisonment.”
82Greek: κάθειρξη
Romanization: káthirxi
Translation: “imprisonment”

Part of speech: Noun

83Greek: ενάγων
Romanization: enágon
Translation: “claimant”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Σε μια δίκη υπάρχει πάντα ο ενάγων και ο εναγόμενος.

Romanization: Se mia díki ipárhi pánda o enágon ke o enagómenos.

Translation: “In a trial, there’s always a claimant and a defendant.”
84Greek: εναγόμενος
Romanization: enagómenos
Translation: “defendant”

Part of speech: Noun

85Greek: παράβαση
Romanization: parávasi
Translation: “violation”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Είναι παράβαση να οδηγείς με σβηστά τα φώτα τη νύχτα και διώκεται ως πλημμέλημα.

Romanization: Íne parávasi na odiyís me svistá ta fóta ti níhta ke diókete os plimélima.

Translation: “It is a violation to drive with the lights off at night and is being prosecuted as a misdemeanor.”
86Greek: πλημμέλημα
Romanization: plimélima
Translation: “misdemeanor”

Part of speech: Noun

87Greek: απόφαση
Romanization: apófasi
Translation: “judgment”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Εάν δε μείνετε ικανοποιημένοι με την απόφαση του δικαστηρίου μπορείτε να ασκήσετε το δικαίωμα της ένστασης καταθέτοντας έφεση.

Romanization: Eán de mínete ikanopiiméni me tin apófasi tu dikastiríu boríte na askísete to dikéoma tis énstasis.

Translation: “If you are not satisfied with the judgment of a trial, you may choose to exercise your right to object by filing an appeal.”
88Greek: ένσταση
Romanization: énstasi
Translation: “objection”

Part of speech: Noun
89Greek: έφεση
Romanization: éfesi
Translation: “appeal”

Part of speech: Noun

90Greek: συνήγορος υπεράσπισης
Romanization: sinígoros iperáspisis
Translation: “defense attorney”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Ο συνήγορος υπεράσπισης κατέθεσε μήνυση για συκοφαντική δυσφήμιση.

Romanization: O sinígoros iperáspisis katéthese mínisi ya sikofandikí disfímisi.

Translation: “The defense attorney filed a defamation suit.”
91Greek: μήνυση
Romanization: mínisi
Translation: “lawsuit” / “suit”

Part of speech: Noun

92Greek: νόμος
Romanization: nómos
Translation: “law”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Ο νόμος είναι πιο ισχυρός από ένα προεδρικό διάταγμα.

Romanization: O nómos íne pio ishirós apó éna proedrikó diátagma.

Translation: “The law is more powerful than a presidential decree.”
93Greek: διάταγμα
Romanization: diátagma
Translation: “decree”

Part of speech: Noun

94Greek: νομοθετική εξουσία
Romanization: nomothetikí exusía
Translation: “legislative power”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Η νομοθετική εξουσία έχει την αρμοδιότητα ψήφισης των νόμων του κράτους.

Romanization: I nomothetikí exusía éhi tin armodiótita psífisis ton nómon tu krátus.

Translation: “The legislative power has the competence of passing state laws.”
95Greek: αρμοδιότητα
Romanization: armodiótita
Translation: “competence” / “power”

Part of speech: Noun

96Greek: ένορκος
Romanization: énorkos
Translation: “jury”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Οι ένορκοι καταδίκασαν τον δράστη της επίθεσης.

Romanization: I énorki katadíkasan ton drásti tis epíthesis.

Translation: “The jury condemned the perpetrator of the attack.”
97Greek: καταδικάζω
Romanization: katadikázo
Translation: “condemn”

Part of speech: Verb
98Greek: δράστης
Romanization: drástis
Translation: “perpetrator”

Part of speech: Noun

99Greek: κληρονομιά
Romanization: klironomiá
Translation: “inheritance”

Part of speech: Noun
Example:

Greek: Δεν είναι στη δικαιοδοσία ενός ποινικού δικαστηρίου να αποφασίζει για διαφορές κληρονομιάς.

Romanization: Den íne sti dikeodosía enós pinikú dikastiríu na apofasízi ya diaforés klironomiás.

Translation: “It’s not within the jurisdiction of a criminal court to decide on inheritance disputes.”
100Greek: δικαιοδοσία
Romanization: dikeodosía
Translation: “jurisdiction”

Part of speech: Noun

5. Other Advanced Words

A Few Happy Students

In this section of the article, you will find some more sophisticated verbs, adverbs, and adjectives that you can use to impress even native speakers. 

5.1 Verbs

101Greek: αμφιβάλλω
Romanization: amfiválo
Translation: “to doubt”
Example:

Greek: Αμφιβάλλω αν κατάλαβες τι σου είπα.

Romanization: Amfiválo an katálaves ti su ípa.

Translation: “I doubt that you understood what I told you.”

102Greek: αναγγέλλω
Romanization: anangélo
Translation: “to announce”
Example:

Greek: Θα ήθελα να σας αναγγείλω τον αρραβώνα μου με τη Μαρία.

Romanization: Tha íthela na sas anangílo ton aravóna mu me ti María.

Translation: “I would like to announce to you my engagement to Maria.”

103Greek: αναδεικνύω
Romanization: anadiknío
Translation: “to highlight”
Example:

Greek: Το νέο πάρκο αναδεικνύει την ομορφιά της πόλης.

Romanization: To néo párko anadikníi tin omorfiá tis pólis.

Translation: “The new park highlights the beauty of the city.”

104Greek: αναπαριστώ
Romanization: anaparistó
Translation: “to represent”
Example:

Greek: Μπορείς να αναπαραστήσεις τα στατιστικά δεδομένα με διαγράμματα.

Romanization: Borís na anaparastísis ta statistiká dedoména me diagrámata.

Translation: “You can represent statistical data with charts.”

105Greek: αναστέλλω
Romanization: anastélo
Translation: “to inhibit”
Example:

Greek: Από αύριο αναστέλλεται η λειτουργία των παλιών υπολογιστών. 

Romanization: Apó ávrio anastélete i lituryía ton palión ipoloyistón.

Translation: “From tomorrow on, the function of old computers will be inhibited.”

106Greek: αποδεικνύω
Romanization: apodiknío
Translation: “to prove”
Example:

Greek: Θέλω να σου αποδείξω πόσο σε αγαπάω.

Romanization: Thélo na su apodíxo póso se agapáo.

Translation: “I want to prove to you how much I love you.”

107Greek: διαβάλλω
Romanization: diaválo
Translation: “to calumniate”
Example:

Greek: Σταμάτα να με διαβάλλεις στους φίλους μου!

Romanization: Stamáta na me diavális stus fílus mu!

Translation: “Stop calumniating me to my friends!”

108Greek: διαθέτω
Romanization: diathéto
Translation: “to have”
Example:

Greek: Κάθε δωμάτιο του ξενοδοχείου διαθέτει κλιματισμό.

Romanization: Káthe domátio tu xenodohíu diathéti klimatismó.

Translation: “Every room of the hotel has air conditioning.”

109Greek: διανέμω
Romanization: dianémo
Translation: “to distribute”
Example:

Greek: Η εφημερίδα διανέμεται καθημερινά σε πολλά σημεία πώλησης.

Romanization: I efimerída dianémete kathimeriná se polá simía pólisis.

Translation: “The newspaper is distributed to many sales points every day.”

110Greek: εγκαθιστώ
Romanization: egkathistó
Translation: “to establish” / “to settle”
Example:

Greek: Πολλοί Έλληνες έχουν μεταναστεύσει και εγκατασταθεί σε άλλες χώρες.

Romanization: Polí Élines éhun metanastéfsi ke egkatastathí se áles hóres.

Translation: “Many Greeks have emigrated and settled in other countries.”

111Greek: εκδίδω
Romanization: ekdído
Translation: “to publish”
Example:

Greek: Αυτός ο εκδοτικός οίκος εκδίδει μόνο παραμύθια για παιδιά. 

Romanization: Aftós o ekdotikós íkos ekdídi móno paramíthia ya pediá.

Translation: “This publisher publishes only fairy tales for children.”

112Greek: εξαγγέλλω
Romanization: exagkélo
Translation: “to announce”
Example:

Greek: Ο πρωθυπουργός εξήγγειλε μείωση φόρων.

Romanization: O prothipurgós exígkile míosi fóron.

Translation: “The prime minister announced a tax reduction.”

113Greek: εξαιρώ
Romanization: exeró
Translation: “to exempt”
Example:

Greek: Αυτή η παράγραφος εξαιρέθηκε από τη διδακτέα ύλη.

Romanization: Aftí i parágrafos exeréthike apó ti didaktéa íli.

Translation: “This paragraph was exempted from the curriculum.”

114Greek: επαινώ
Romanization: epenó
Translation: “to praise”
Example:

Greek: Ένας καλός δάσκαλος πάντα επαινεί τους μαθητές του.

Romanization: Énas kalós dáskalos pánda epení tus mathités tu.

Translation: “A good teacher always praises his students.”

115Greek: επιδεικνύω
Romanization: epidiknío
Translation: “to exhibit” / “to show off”
Example:

Greek: Δεν είναι καλό να επιδεικνύεις τον πλούτο σου.

Romanization: Den íne kaló na epidikníis ton plúto su.

Translation: “It’s not good to show off your wealth.”

116Greek: εφευρίσκω
Romanization: efevrísko
Translation: “to invent”
Example:

Greek: Πάντα εφευρίσκω νέους τρόπους για να διασκεδάζω.

Romanization: Pánda efevrísko néus trópus ya na diaskedázo.

Translation: “I always invent new ways to entertain myself.”

117Greek: θίγω
Romanization: thígo
Translation: “to touch on” / “to raise”
Example:

Greek: Ας μη θίξουμε αυτό το ζήτημα.

Romanization: As mi thíxume aftó to zítima.

Translation: “Let’s not raise this issue.”

118Greek: καθιστώ
Romanization: kathistó
Translation: “to make”
Example:

Greek: Πάντα καθιστώ σαφές το τι θέλω.

Romanization: Pánda kathistó safés to ti thélo.

Translation: “I always make clear what I want.”

119Greek: καταγγέλω
Romanization: katangélo
Translation: “to report”
Example:

Greek: Θα ήθελα να καταγγείλω ότι κάποιος μου έκλεψε το πορτοφόλι.

Romanization: Tha íthela na katagkílo óti kápios mu éklepse to portofóli.

Translation: “I would like to report that someone has stolen my wallet.”

120Greek: κρίνω
Romanization: kríno
Translation: “to judge”
Example:

Greek: Μην κρίνεις για να μην κριθείς.

Romanization: Min krínis ya na min krithís.

Translation: “Do not judge, and you will not be judged.”

121Greek: μεταβάλλω
Romanization: metaválo
Translation: “to change”
Example:

Greek: Οι τιμές των μετοχών συνεχώς μεταβάλλονται.

Romanization: I timés ton metohón sinehós metaválonde.

Translation: “The prices of shares are constantly changing.”

122Greek: παραδίδω
Romanization: paradído
Translation: “to hand over”
Example:

Greek: Σου παραδίδω τα κλειδιά του σπιτιού μου.

Romanization: Su paradído ta klidiá tu spitiú mu.

Translation: “I am handing over the keys of my house to you.”

123Greek: παρελαύνω
Romanization: parelávno
Translation: “to parade”
Example:

Greek: Όλα τα σχολεία παρελαύνουν στις εθνικές επετείους.

Romanization: Óla ta sholía parelávnun stis ethikés epetíus.

Translation: “All schools parade on national days.”

124Greek: περιλαμβάνω
Romanization: perilamváno
Translation: “to include”
Example:

Greek: Τι περιλαμβάνεται στο πακέτο;

Romanization: Ti perilamvánete sto pakéto?

Translation: “What is included in the package?”

125Greek: πλήττω
Romanization: plíto
Translation: “to hit” / “to strike”
Example:

Greek: Η κακοκαιρία έπληξε κυρίως την πρωτεύουσα.

Romanization: I kakokería éplixe kiríos tin protévusa.

Translation: “The bad weather hit mainly the capital.”

126Greek: προβάλλω
Romanization: proválo
Translation: “to project”
Example:

Greek: Μη φοβάσαι να προβάλλεις τα επιχειρήματά σου.

Romanization: Mi fováse na provális ta epihirímatá su.

Translation: “Don’t be afraid to put forward your arguments.”

127Greek: προτείνω
Romanization: protíno
Translation: “to suggest” / “to recommend”
Example:

Greek: Μπορείτε να μου προτείνετε ένα καλό εστιατόριο;

Romanization: Boríte na mu protínete éna kaló estiatório?

Translation: “Can you recommend a good restaurant?”

128Greek: συμπίπτω
Romanization: simbípto
Translation: “to coincide”
Example:

Greek: Οι απόψεις μας δε συμπίπτουν.

Romanization: I apópsis mas de simbíptun. 

Translation: “Our views do not coincide.”

129Greek: υφίσταμαι
Romanization: ifístame
Translation: “to incur”
Example:

Greek: Υφίσταμαι εργασιακό εκφοβισμό.

Romanization: Ifístame ergasiakó ekfovizmó.

Translation: “I am being bullied at work.”

5.2 Adverbs

130Greek: εξαίσια
Romanization: exésia
Translation: “exquisitely”
Example:

Greek: Χθες επισκεφτήκαμε ένα ακριβό εστιατόριο και φάγαμε εξαίσια.

Romanization: Hthes episkeftíkame éna akrivó estiatório ke fágame exésia.

Translation: “Yesterday, we visited an expensive restaurant and we ate exquisitely.”

131Greek: επιπροσθέτως
Romanization: epiprosthétos
Translation: “moreover”
Example:

Greek: Επιπροσθέτως θα πρέπει να υπολογίσουμε τα εισιτήρια. 

Romanization: Epiprosthétos tha prépi na ipoloyísume ta isitíria.

Translation: “Moreover, we should calculate the tickets.”

132Greek: σθεναρά
Romanization: sthenará
Translation: “strongly” / “bravely”
Example:

Greek: Αντιστέκομαι σθεναρά, για να μη φάω την τούρτα. 

Romanization: Andistékome sthenará, ya na mi fáo tin túrta.

Translation: “I am resisting strongly against eating the cake.”

133Greek: δυσμενώς
Romanization: dizmenós
Translation: “adversely”
Example:

Greek: Το καυσαέριο επηρεάζει δυσμενώς τον πλανήτη.

Romanization: To kafsaério epireázi dizmenós ton planíti.

Translation: “Exhaust gas adversely influences the planet.”

134Greek: επειγόντως
Romanization: epigóndos
Translation: “urgently”
Example:

Greek: Αυτό το έγγραφο πρέπει να σταλεί επειγόντως

Romanization: Aftó to éngrafo prépi na stalí epigóndos.

Translation: “This document should be sent urgently.”

135Greek: παρομοίως
Romanization: paromíos
Translation: “likewise”
Example:

Greek: 
― Χαίρω πολύ.
Παρομοίως.

Romanization: 
― Héro polí.
― Paromíos.


Translation: 
― “Nice to meet you.”
― “Likewise.”

136Greek: ακροθιγώς
Romanization: akrothigós
Translation: “superficially” / “generally”
Example:

Greek: Πολλές φορές αναλύουμε ακροθιγώς ζητήματα που μας απασχολούν.

Romanization: Polés forés analíume akrothigós zitímata pu mas apasholún. 

Translation: “Many times we superficially analyze issues that concern us.”

137Greek: εμπεριστατωμένα
Romanization: emberistatoména
Translation: “thoroughly”
Example:

Greek: Ο δάσκαλος ανέλυσε εμπεριστατωμένα αυτήν την πρόταση.

Romanization: O dáskalos anélise emberistatoména aftín tin prótasi.

Translation: “The teacher analyzed this sentence thoroughly.” 

138Greek: απρόσμενα
Romanization: aprózmena
Translation: “unexpectedly”
Example:

Greek: Ένας σεισμός γίνεται πάντα απρόσμενα.

Romanization: Énas sizmós yínete pánda aprózmena.

Translation: “An earthquake always happens unexpectedly.”

139Greek: επιπόλαια
Romanization: epipólea
Translation: “irresponsibly”
Example:

Greek: Πρέπει να σκέφτεσαι διπλά πριν κάνεις κάτι και να μη φέρεσαι επιπόλαια

Romanization: Prépi na skéftese diplá prin kánis káti ke na mi férese epipólea.

Translation: “You should think twice before doing something and not act irresponsibly.”

5.3 Adjectives

140Greek: πελώριος
Romanization: pelórios
Translation: “huge”
Example:

Greek: Ο ελέφαντας είναι ένα πελώριο ζώο.

Romanization: O eléfandas íne éna pelório zóo.

Translation: “The elephant is a huge animal.”

141Greek: μικροσκοπικός
Romanization: mikroskopikós
Translation: “tiny”
Example:

Greek: Το μυρμήγκι είναι ένα μικροσκοπικό ζώο.

Romanization: To mirmígki íne éna mikroskopikó zóo.

Translation: “The ant is a tiny animal.”

142Greek: εύσωμος
Romanization: éfsomos
Translation: “burly”
Example:

Greek: Έχει λίγα κιλά παραπάνω και είναι εύσωμος.

Romanization: Éhi líga kilá parapáno ke íne éfsomos.

Translation: “He’s got a few excess kilos and he is burly.”

143Greek: εκλεπτυσμένος
Romanization: ekleptizménos
Translation: “refined” / “classy” / “sophisticated”
Example:

Greek: Η Μαρία φοράει πάντα ωραία ρούχα. Είναι πολύ εκλεπτυσμένη.

Romanization: I María forái pánda oréa rúha. Íne polí ekleptizméni.

Translation: “Maria always wears nice clothes. She is very classy.”

144Greek: αποκρουστικός
Romanization: apokrustikós
Translation: “repulsive”
Example:

Greek: Αυτή η δημόσια τουαλέτα ήταν αποκρουστική.

Romanization: Aftí i dimósia tualéta ítan apokrustikí.

Translation: “This public bathroom is repulsive.”

145Greek: επιλεκτικός
Romanization: epilektikós
Translation: “selective”
Example:

Greek: Στις σχέσεις μου είμαι πολύ επιλεκτικός.

Romanization: Stis shésis mu íme polí epilektikós.

Translation: “In my relationships, I am very selective.”

146Greek: απαράδεκτος
Romanization: aparádektos
Translation: “unacceptable”
Example:

Greek: Αυτό που έκανες ήταν απαράδεκτο

Romanization: Aftó pu ékanes ítan aparádekto.

Translation: “What you did was unacceptable.”

147Greek: προοδευτικός
Romanization: proodeftikós
Translation: “progressive”
Example:

Greek: Αυτή η κυβέρνηση είναι πολύ προοδευτική.

Romanization: Aftí i kivérnisi íne polí proodeftikí.

Translation: “This government is very progressive.”

148Greek: οπισθοδρομικός
Romanization: opisthodromikós
Translation: “regressive”
Example:

Greek: Ο πατέρας μου ήταν πολύ οπισθοδρομικός.

Romanization: O patéras mu ítan polí opisthodromikós.

Translation: “My father was very regressive.”

149Greek: ποικιλόμορφος
Romanization: pikilómorfos
Translation: “diverse”
Example:

Greek: Η σύγχρονη κοινωνία είναι ποικιλόμορφη.

Romanization: I sínhroni kinonía íne pikilómorfi.

Translation: “The modern society is diverse.”

150Greek: αψεγάδιαστος
Romanization: apsegádiastos
Translation: “spotless” / “flawless”
Example:

Greek: Το δέρμα της είναι λείο και αψεγάδιαστο.

Romanization: To dérma tis íne lío ke apsegádiasto.

Translation: “Her skin is smooth and flawless.”

6. How can GreekPod101.com help you learn Greek?

In this article, we covered some of the essential terminology in the academic, business, medical, and legal sectors for advanced students. 

Did you know any of these words already, or were they all new to you? If you’re a complete novice, this list might feel a bit too much for you, so just take it step by step. 

All you need to clear things up is a bit of help from a Greek teacher. 

What if you could have access to educational material from real teachers?

GreekPod101.com offers you a free lifetime account granting you access to high-quality, practical lessons about the Greek language and culture. We aim to provide you with everything you need to know about Greek in a fun and interesting way. 

And if you need a bit more help, you can also upgrade to Premium PLUS and take advantage of our MyTeacher service to learn Greek with your own personal teacher, who will answer any questions you might have!

Stay tuned for more articles like this one, wordlists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos, which are waiting for you to discover.

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Your Guide to the Greek Language Certification Examination

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So, you’ve been learning Greek for a while, and have reached a certain level of fluency. 

Now what?

Learning a new language is mainly a personal journey, but there are certain situations where having a certification could be useful. Through an official Greek test or exam, you can test your knowledge and add a new language to your CV. 

Here’s everything you need to know about getting your Greek language knowledge certified.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Study Strategies in Greek Table of Contents
  1. General Information About the Exam
  2. Examination Sections
  3. A1 Level – Beginner
  4. A2 Level – Elementary
  5. B1 Level – Intermediate
  6. B2 Level – Upper-Intermediate
  7. C1 Level – Advanced
  8. C2 Level – Proficiency
  9. Tips on How to Prepare for the Exam
  10. Conclusion

1. General Information About the Exam

The organization responsible for the Official Greek Assessment Test for Foreigners is The Center of Greek Language (Κέντρο Ελληνικής Γλώσσας).

Students Writing an Exam

The available levels, listed below, correspond to the European Standards:

  • A1: Beginner
  • A2: Elementary
  • B1: Intermediate
  • B2: Upper-Intermediate
  • C1: Advanced
  • C2: Mastery or Proficiency

This Greek examination is offered for the following purposes:

  • Business Purposes. For some jobs, it’s a prerequisite to be certified in the Greek language. The required extent of this knowledge is determined by each job position.
  • Studying Purposes. In order to study in a Greek university, the prerequisite is to hold a B2 certificate or higher.
  • Working for the Public Sector. To apply for a job in the Greek public sector, one must have the C1 certificate or higher.
  • Residence Permit (Long-Lasting). In order to acquire a long-lasting residence permit, one of the prerequisites is to hold at least an A2 Greek knowledge certificate.
  • Specified Business Purposes. Some fields of work, such as taxi-driving and nursing, require at least the A2 Greek knowledge certificate. 

However, you can choose to get your knowledge certified for other reasons.

A Woman Preparing for the Greek Exams

There’s a wide variety of topics referenced in the Greek language proficiency exams, which cover many aspects of everyday life, including:

  • Personal life inside and outside the house
    • Recognition of one’s identity
    • Residence
    • Location, Environment, Flora & Fauna, Weather Conditions
    • Free Time & Entertainment
    • Social Relations
    • Health & Body Condition
  • Everyday life
    • Activities inside the house
    • Activities outside the house (Purchasing Products & Services, Nutrition, Education, Worklife, Public Services, Transportation & Traveling)

The exams take place once a year (most commonly in mid-May). There are many examination centers in Europe, the USA, Canada, South America, North and South Africa, Asia, and Australia.

2. Examination Sections

The Greek language exams can be taken at six possible levels, which we outlined earlier. The number of sections a test has depends on what level it is:

  • Levels A1, A2, B1
    • Four sections (Reading, Listening, Writing, Speaking)
  • Levels B2, C1, C2
    • Five sections (Listening, Reading, Use of Greek, Writing, Speaking)
A Woman Studying Greek
  • Reading 

This part of the Greek proficiency exam aims to check how well a student understands written Greek. Normally, a short passage is given, followed by questions. For the lower levels, these questions may include multiple choices and matching choices, whereas higher levels will have more complicated questions.

  • Listening 

This part of the examination usually includes short dialogues by native speakers. The types and lengths of the dialogues can vary depending on the level of the examination. Normally, there are multiple-choice answers for each question. 

  • Writing 

For beginner levels, students are normally asked to write a letter to a friend or a family member, presenting their opinion about or experience with a specific matter. For more intermediate levels, the writing section might include an essay or a more formal letter. 

  • Speaking 

For the Greek speaking exam, students are assessed in groups of two. Normally, a central question is given, which sets the tone of the discussion. In this section, the students are asked to express their opinion on a variety of everyday matters. 

  • Use of Greek

This is probably the least familiar section to students. It normally includes a two- or three-paragraphs-long passage, where there are gaps. For each gap, the student should choose the most appropriate word from multiple choices. This part is only included in upper-level examinations, mainly because it aims to test a student’s knowledge of special expressions and colloquialisms.

3. A1 Level – Beginner

This is the first examination level, and it includes four sections: Reading, Listening, Writing, and Speaking. 

Here’s an overview of the exam:

ReadingListeningWritingSpeaking
Parts442N/A
Duration30 minutes25 minutes40 minutes10-12 minutes
MeansN/ACDN/A2 Examiners & 2 Candidates
% Marking (Points)25252525

The main goal of this examination is to test the basic skills in understanding and producing written and oral Greek.

Language Skills

4. A2 Level – Elementary

The next level includes the same sections: Reading, Listening, Writing, and Speaking.

You can find an overview of the exam below:

ReadingListeningWritingSpeaking
Parts442N/A
Duration30 minutes25 minutes45 minutes12 minutes
MeansN/ACDN/A2 Examiners & 2 Candidates
% Marking (Points)25252525

5. B1 Level – Intermediate

The intermediate level follows the same layout, with the same sections: Reading, Listening, Writing, and Speaking.

Here’s an overview of the B1 Level examination: 

ReadingListeningWritingSpeaking
Parts422N/A
Duration40 minutes25 minutes55 minutes12 minutes
MeansN/ACDN/A2 Examiners & 2 Candidates
% Marking (Points)25252525

6. B2 Level – Upper-Intermediate

As we’ve already mentioned, a new section is included in this level: Use of Greek, along with Reading, Listening, Writing, and Speaking.

An overview of the examination is demonstrated below:

ReadingListeningWritingSpeakingUse of Greek
Parts322N/AN/A
Duration45 minutes30 minutes85 minutes15 minutes30 minutes
MeansN/ACDN/A2 Examiners & 2 Candidates3 Examiners
% Marking (Points)2020202020

7. C1 Level – Advanced

This examination is definitely for advanced learners. Although it includes the same sections as the previous level, the students should be comfortable with some native Greek expressions and colloquialisms.

Here’s an overview of the examination:

ReadingListeningWritingSpeakingUse of Greek
Parts422N/AN/A
Duration55 minutes40 minutes100 minutes20 minutes30 minutes
MeansN/ACDN/A2 Examiners & 2 Candidates4 Examiners
% Marking (Points)2020202020

8. C2 Level – Proficiency

This is your chance to shine! 

When you achieve fluency, this is definitely the ultimate examination—and the most difficult. It includes many native expressions and it requires deep knowledge of Greek grammar and its exceptions, as well as fluency in oral speech. 

Find a summary of the complete examination below:

ReadingListeningWritingSpeakingUse of Greek
Parts422N/AN/A
Duration55 minutes40 minutes100 minutes20 minutes30 minutes
MeansN/ACDN/A2 Examiners & 2 Candidates4 Examiners
% Marking (Points)2020202020

9. Tips on How to Prepare for the Exam

A Happy Man Who Got a Good Grade

Preparing for any exam requires much effort and discipline. Here are some useful tips you can use to make this process as easy as possible.

  • Start with the Grammar

Create a notebook with grammar tips and revise your notes regularly. Greek grammar is not very easy, and it includes many exceptions to the various rules, so you should be prepared to study a lot of grammar whilst preparing for the exam.

  • Continue with Vocabulary

Another notebook you should create is a vocabulary notebook. Simply write down all of the unknown words you encounter while studying. For adjectives, it’s good to write down their variations in different genders (male, female, neutral), as well.

  • Read Greek Articles Online

Did you know you can have endless reading practice online? You can find a wide variety of articles on various subjects from Greek websites. Select a theme you like and begin reading articles in Greek! Write down any unknown words and enhance your vocabulary notebook.

  • Read Greek Books

Another great way to improve your reading and comprehension skills is reading Greek books. If you’re a novice Greek learner, start with children’s books, which use much simpler language and vocabulary. 

  • Watch Greek TV Shows

Watching Greek movies and TV shows will improve your listening skills for sure! Actually, we’ve prepared a relevant list for you with the most wonderful Greek movies. Check it out! 

  • MyTeacher – Your Teacher

Did you know that you can have a personal tutor to answer all your questions, without ever leaving your home? With our premium MyTeacher feature, you’ll be assigned a personal teacher who will share with you all the important tips, grammar rules, and native expressions you need to reach fluency. 

  • Do as Many Mock Tests as You Can

Okay, this is obvious. You have to get used to the layout of the examination you’re going to take. So, you should spend some time practicing by doing as many mock tests as you can.

10. Conclusion

Taking a Greek language exam can be useful whether you aim to work in Greece or you just want to certify your knowledge. 

If you need more info about the official Greek examinations, you can always visit the Official Website of Greek Learning; you can also find some sample tests there. However, the website is in Greek, so you should have some basic knowledge to ensure a smooth browsing experience.

Start learning Greek today in a consistent and organized manner by creating a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com. Tons of free vocabulary lists, YouTube videos, and grammar tips are waiting for you to discover. 

How do you feel about taking a Greek exam now? If you have any questions, let us know in the comments and we’d be happy to help!

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Greek Life Events Phrases: Happy Birthday in Greek & More

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Ever wondered how to say Happy Birthday in Greek?

Well, now you can easily learn all the useful Greek phrases about various life events, brought to you in this article by GreekPod101.com.

Learning—and using—the most popular Greek life event messages, such as Merry Christmas in Greek and Happy New Year in Greek, can be a nice surprise for your Greek friends.

Let’s have a look at the most appropriate ready-to-use Greek congratulations phrases you can use for each of the following occasions.

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Table of Contents

  1. Birthday
  2. Pregnancy and Birth
  3. Graduation
  4. New Job or Promotion
  5. Retirement
  6. Wedding
  7. Death or Funeral
  8. Bad News
  9. Illness or Injury
  10. Holidays
  11. New Beginnings within the Year
  12. Acquiring Something New
  13. Meals
  14. Conclusion

1. Birthday

Happy Birthday

Greeks love birthdays and name-days. They often organize small feasts, during which all of their friends are gathered to celebrate. If you have a Greek friend, feel free to wish them a happy birthday in Greek by choosing one of the following Greek congratulations phrases.

Greek: Χρόνια πολλά!
Romanization: Hrónia polá!
Meaning: “Happy birthday!” / “Happy Name Day!” (Literally: [I wish you] many years [to live]!)

Greek: Και στα εκατό!
Romanization: Ke sta ekató!
Meaning: “(May you live) up to 100 years old!”

Greek: Να χαίρεσαι το όνομά σου!
Romanization: Na hérese to ónomá su!
Meaning: “Be happy for your name!”

Greek: Χρόνια πολλά, έστω και καθυστερημένα!
Romanization: Hrónia polá, ésto ke kathisteriména!
Meaning: “Happy belated birthday!” (Literally: Happy birthday, although belated!)

Greek: Να τα εκατοστήσεις!
Romanization: Na ta ekatostísis!
Meaning: “May you reach 100 years old!”

Greek: Να τα χιλιάσεις!
Romanization: Na ta hiliásis!
Meaning: “May you reach 1000 years old!”

Greek: Πολύχρονος (masculine) / Πολύχρονη (feminine)!
Romanization: Políhronos / Políhroni!
Meaning: “(May you be) long-lived!”

Greek: Ό,τι επιθυμείς!
Romanization: Ó,ti epithimís!
Meaning: “(May you get) everything you desire!”

2. Pregnancy and Birth

Talking about Age

Bringing a new human to life has always been a major event in Greece. Friends and family are really happy and tend to send gifts to the happy couple. However, unlike in other countries, Greeks do not organize baby showers.

Greek: Να σας ζήσει!
Romanization: Na sas zísi!
Meaning: “(May your baby) live long!”

Greek: Γερό και καλότυχο να είναι!
Romanization: Yeró ke kalótiho na íne!
Meaning: “(May the baby) be healthy and fortunate!”

Οther popular wishes usually said to pregnant women are shown below.

Greek: Με έναν πόνο!
Romanization: Me énan póno!
Meaning: “(May the baby come out) with one pain!”

Greek: Με το καλό!
Romanization: Me to kaló!
Meaning: “(God willing) everything will be fine!”
Additional Note: This can be used in many social situations since it’s a very generic way to wish for a positive outcome.

Greek: Καλή λευτεριά!
Romanization: Kalí lefteriá!
Meaning: “(I wish you) good freedom!”
Additional Note: This is a way of wishing a woman relief after her pregnancy.

3. Graduation

Basic Questions

Greece has one of the highest percentages of university graduates in Europe. Therefore, it’s common to celebrate one’s graduation from a university, usually with a big dinner with friends and family.

If you happen to have a friend who’s graduating, feel free to pick and use one of the following congratulations in Greek.

Greek: Συγχαρητήρια!
Romanization: Sinharitíria!
Meaning: “Congratulations!”

Greek: Και εις ανώτερα!
Romanization: Ke is anótera!
Meaning: “May you achieve greater things!”

Greek: Καλή πρόοδο!
Romanization: Kalí próodo!
Meaning: “(I wish you) good progress!”

All of the above phrases can be either formal or informal, and can be said or written in a card. In Greece, when a friend or a family member is graduating, it’s common to offer a present. It would be a nice surprise for your Greek friend to find some Greek wishes in the accompanying card!

4. New Job or Promotion

An Arrogant Businessman with a Crown

Getting a promotion is something that many people pursue, usually for many years. They deserve a happy wish, don’t they? You can choose and use one of the following.

Greek: Συγχαρητήρια για την προαγωγή σου!
Romanization: Sinharitíria ya tin proagoyí su!
Meaning: “Congratulations on your promotion!”

Greek: Σου εύχομαι καλή επιτυχία στη νέα σου θέση!
Romanization: Su éfhome kalí epitihía sti néa su thési!
Meaning: “I wish you good luck (lit. great success) on your new position!”

5. Retirement

An Aged Man Being Happy about Retirement

Retirement for some is the ultimate dream. Getting old isn’t pleasant. You get tired easier, and after so many years of work, retirement seems awesome.

Here’s an appropriate wish you can use when someone you know is retiring.

Greek: Τις καλύτερες ευχές μου για το νέο κεφάλαιο της ζωής σου!
Romanization: Tis kalíteres efhés mu ya to néo kefáleo tis zoís su!
Meaning: “Best wishes on your new chapter in life!”

6. Wedding

Marriage Proposal

Well, marriage is a big party, isn’t it? This is exactly what happens in Greece. The newlyweds normally organize a big feast after their marriage to celebrate their happiness with friends and family.

But what do you say at a Greek wedding? Below, you can find a wide variety of Greek wedding congratulations you can say to the happy couple!

Greek: Να ζήσετε!
Romanization: Na zísete!
Meaning: “(May you) live long!”

Greek: Βίον ανθόσπαρτον!
Romanization: Víon anthósparton!
Meaning: “(May your) life be full of flowers!”

Greek: Καλούς απογόνους!
Romanization: Kalús apogónus!
Meaning: “(May you have) good offspring!”

Greek: Η ώρα η καλή!
Romanization: I óra i kalí!
Meaning: “May the time of your marriage be good!”
Additional Note: This is said to the couple before getting married.

Greek: Και στα δικά σου!
Romanization: Ke sta diká su!
Meaning: “May you get married as well!”
Additional Note: This is said to the single people attending a wedding.

When the wedding party is over (or any other social gathering, really), the following expression is a very common thing for a host to say to his guests when they’re leaving:

Greek: Να πας (informal) / πάτε (formal, plural) στο καλό!
Romanization: Na pas / páte sto kaló!
Meaning: “Farewell!”
Additional Note: This is said to wish someone well when parting.

7. Death or Funeral

A Woman Mourning

A funeral in Greece comes with great grievance and it’s considered to be a major social event. Normally, funerals are organized in churches, since most Greeks are Orthodox Christians. If you need to express your condolences, you can select one of the following Greek funeral condolences.

Greek: Θεός ‘σχωρέστον! (masculine) / Θεός ‘σχωρέστην! (feminine)
Romanization: Theós ‘schoréston! / Theós ‘schoréstin!
Meaning: “May God forgive him / her!”

Greek: Ζωή σε εσάς! / Ζωή σε λόγου σας!
Romanization: Zoí se esás! / Zoí se lógu sas!
Meaning: “(May you) live long!”
Additional Note: This refers to the family of the deceased.

Greek: Να ζήσετε να τον / τη θυμάστε!
Romanization: Na zísete na ton / ti thimáste!
Meaning: “(May you) live long in order to remember him / her!”
Additional Note: This also refers to the family of the deceased.

Greek: (Τα) συλλυπητήριά (μου)!
Romanization: (Ta) silipitíriá (mu)!
Meaning: “(My) condolences!”

8. Bad News

A Woman Being Sad

Show your Greek friends that you care by using the following ready-to-use Greek condolences messages.

Greek: Λυπάμαι πολύ!
Romanization: Lipáme polí!
Meaning: “I am deeply sorry!”

Greek: Λυπάμαι πολύ για αυτό που συνέβη!
Romanization: Lipáme polí ya aftó pu sinévi!
Meaning: “I am deeply sorry for what happened!”

9. Illness or Injury

A Woman at the Hospital Being Visited by Her Children

In the unfortunate event of an injury or an illness, it’s considered kind to express your sympathy. You can easily do so with the following Greek phrases.

Greek: Περαστικά!
Romanization: Perastiká!
Meaning: “Get well soon!”

Greek: Καλή ανάρρωση!
Romanization: Kalí anárosi!
Meaning: “Have a good recovery!”

Greek: Σιδερένιος! (masculine) / Σιδερένια! (feminine)
Romanization: Siderénios! / Siderénia!
Meaning: “(Be) tough as iron (from now on)!”
Additional Note: This is usually said after a surgery or serious injury.

Greek: Να προσέχεις!
Romanization: Na proséhis!
Meaning: “Take care!”

10. Holidays

A Christmas Tree Next to a Fireplace

Holidays are all about kindness and gratitude. What do you write in a Greek Christmas card? How do you express good wishes for the holidays?

Here you can find the most popular holiday wishes, such as Merry Christmas in Greek or Happy New Year in Greek.

Greek: Καλά Χριστούγεννα!
Romanization: Kalá Hristúyena!
Meaning: “Merry Christmas!”

Greek: Καλή χρονιά!
Romanization: Kalí hroniá!
Meaning: “Happy New Year!”

Greek: Ευτυχισμένο το 2020!
Romanization: Eftihizméno to dío hiliádes íkosi!
Meaning: “Happy 2020!”

Greek: Καλή Πρωταπριλιά!
Romanization: Kalí Protapriliá!
Meaning: “Happy April Fool’s Day!”

Greek: Καλό Πάσχα!
Romanization: Kaló Páscha!
Meaning: “Happy Easter!”

11. New Beginnings within the Year

A Shuffling Calendar

Interestingly, Greeks tend to exchange wishes, even for minor events, like the beginning of a new month, or even the beginning of a new week. Have a look at the relevant phrases below.

Greek: Καλό μήνα!
Romanization: Kaló mína!
Meaning: “Have a good month!”

Greek: Καλή εβδομάδα!
Romanization: Kalí evdomáda!
Meaning: “Have a good week!”

Greek: Καλό Σαββατοκύριακο!
Romanization: Kaló Savatokíriako!
Meaning: “Have a good weekend!”

12. Acquiring Something New

A Woman Holding a Present

When a friend opens a new shop, or when they acquire something new, such as clothes, shoes, or even when they get a haircut, you might want to wish them the best. Here are some useful phrases for these situations.

Greek: Καλές δουλειές!
Romanization: Kalés duliés!
Meaning: “(May you have) good business!”
Additional Note: This can be said when attending the opening of a shop.

Greek: Με γεια!
Romanization: Me ya!
Meaning: “With health!”
Additional Note: This refers to a new acquisition, and is a wish for it to last. It’s a common expression for a new haircut or object.

Greek: Καλορίζικο!
Romanization: Kaloríziko!
Meaning: “I wish you to enjoy your new acquisition with good luck!”
Additional Note: This is often said when buying a house or opening up a store.

Greek: Καλοτάξιδο!
Romanization: Kalotáxido!
Meaning: “May it travel well!”
Additional Note: This is often said when getting a new car, boat, motorcycle, etc.).

13. Meals

A Group of Friends Eating Lunch

One of the most common occasions is having dinner with some friends. Ever wondered how to say “cheers” in Greek? Read below to find out.

Greek: Γεια μας!
Romanization: Ya mas!
Meaning: “Cheers!”

Greek: Άσπρο πάτο!
Romanization: Áspro páto!
Meaning: “Bottoms up!”

Greek: Γούρι!
Romanization: Gúri!
Meaning: “(That’s) good luck!”
Additional Note: This is usually said when someone spills some of their drink.

Greek: Θα καλοπαντρευτείς!
Romanization: Tha kalopandreftís!
Meaning: “You will have a fortunate marriage!”
Additional Note: This is usually said to someone when pouring the last drops of wine from a bottle or carafe into his or her glass.

Greek: Καλή όρεξη!
Romanization: Kalí óreksi!
Meaning: “Enjoy your meal!” (Literally: Bon appétit!)

14. Conclusion

Interested in getting to know more useful Greek phrases? Join us at GreekPod101.com!

It’s important to know most wishes in Greek language learning, as they’re an integral part of the Greek language. Many people use them when both speaking and writing.

As demonstrated in this article, most of these phrases are closely related to various historical or cultural aspects of the Greek lifestyle. By learning them, you’re more likely to avoid any potential misunderstandings, and you’ll sound like a native Greek speaker.

At GreekPod101.com, we can help you learn the Greek language beyond the basics in an interesting, motivating, and fun way. Articles like this one, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos, are waiting for you to discover them!

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In the meantime, reader, let us know which of these life event messages you plan on trying out first! Good wishes for a relative’s wedding? Telling your Greek friend happy birthday in Greek? Let us know in the comments!

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