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Archive for the 'Greek Culture' Category

A Journey Through Authentic Greek Food

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Finding the right words to describe Greek cuisine is almost impossible. You just need to taste it for yourself—we’re sure that you’ll be amazed! In this article, we’ll help you find your own words to describe iconic Greek dishes and unique Greek food items. 

All traditional Greek foods are based on the Mediterranean diet, usually containing fresh vegetables, pasta, cheese, and extra virgin olive oil. Greek foods are full of flavor since they often include onion, garlic, and a variety of herbs and spices. Although Greek cuisine is not spicy, its rich taste will certainly surprise you.

Of course, there are many unique vocabulary words associated with Greek cuisine, so keep reading if you want to know exactly what to order (and how to order it) during your next visit.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Let's Cook in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Must-Try Traditional Greek Dishes
  2. Unique Greek Products
  3. Authentic Greek Gyros vs. Overseas Gyros
  4. Food-Related Vocabulary
  5. Simple Recipes to Make Authentic Greek Food at Home
  6. Conclusion

1. Must-Try Traditional Greek Dishes

Imagine that you’re at a traditional Greek taverna, browsing through a handwritten menu made with love. These are some of the most popular Greek dishes you should definitely try!

  • Greek: μουσακάς (ο)
  • Romanization: musakás
  • Ingredients: eggplant, potato, ground meat, béchamel

When fresh eggplants and potatoes meet frizzled, fatless ground beef with spices, something magical happens. Add a smooth béchamel sauce, sprinkle with grated cheese, and…perfection! 

This dish consists of thin layers of fried eggplants and potatoes, which are placed inside a deep tray. Then, a ground beef sauce is poured on top in order to gently cover all empty spots. Last, but not least, a béchamel sauce is added and grated cheese is sprinkled on before the tray goes into the oven. There it will stay until the top turns golden brown. 

The result is a real treat for your taste buds!

  • Greek: παστίτσιο (το)
  • Romanization: pastítsio
  • Ingredients: bucatini pasta, grounded graviera cheese, ground meat, tomato sauce, béchamel

This dish might seem very similar to μουσακάς, but it’s a whole different world of deliciousness. In this case, layers of pasta replace the eggplant and potato. The top is filled with béchamel and the tray finally goes in the oven.

Greek: φασολάδα (η)
Romanization: fasoláda
Ingredients: white beans, carrots, tomatoes, celery, onion

Φασολάδα is a rich and highly nutritious soup, containing local white beans and fresh vegetables. When boiled to perfection, the beans are soft and add a unique thickness to the soup. Φασολάδα is a staple of modern Greek cuisine, with many Greek families eating it quite often (especially religious families during the Great Lent).

Traditional Greek Stuffed Vegetables

Photo by Badseed, under CC BY-SA 3.0

  • Greek: γεμιστά (τα)
  • Romanization: yemistá
  • Ingredients: glutinous rice, tomatoes, bell peppers, herbs, onion, minced meat (optional)

The word γεμιστά actually means “stuffed.” This traditional Greek dish consists of stuffed tomatoes, peppers, and sometimes even zucchini, which are stuffed with rice, herbs, and (optionally) minced meat. The stuffed vegetables are baked in the oven and are often served with oven-baked potatoes.

  • Greek: στιφάδο (το)
  • Romanization: stifádo
  • Ingredients: rabbit meat, pearl onions, tomatoes, red wine, cinnamon

This dish is really special. Rabbit and glazed, sweet little pearl onions will surely surprise your mouth. All of this is in a thin tomato sauce which covers each precious bite. With its strong flavor, this dish will surely remind you of French cuisine.

2. Unique Greek Products

The ingredients of Greek cuisine play the most important role in a dish’s end result. Greece is blessed to produce some of the purest organic vegetables, olive oils, and of course the most exclusive Greek product: feta cheese

Let’s take a closer look…

 A Small Bowl Full of Olive Oil
  • Greek: ελαιόλαδο
  • Romanization: eleólado
  • Translation: “olive oil”

Greek olive oil is praised worldwide and many producers have won several international competitions for the taste and purity of their olive oil. It’s not a coincidence that Ancient Greeks used to massage their body and hair with olive oil, which was used as a natural remedy for the skin.

A Close-up Image of Two Green Olives on a Branch
  • Greek: ελιά
  • Romanization: eliá
  • Translation: “olive”

An exquisite oil is always produced from high-quality raw materials. Greek olive oil comes from some of the most tasteful olives in the Mediterranean. 

In fact, the olive tree was considered sacred in Ancient Greece. According to the local mythology, a contest between Athena and Poseidon to determine who would become Athens’ protector, resulted in the creation of the first olive tree.

Moreover, an olive wreath was the prize of the Ancient Greek Olympic Games. The winner wore this wreath on their head, enjoying one of the most prestigious moments of their life. 

A Slice of Feta Cheese
  • Greek: φέτα
  • Romanization: féta
  • Translation: “feta cheese”

Feta cheese is a semi-soft (or semi-hard) white cheese soaked in brine. In 2002, the European Commission recognized φέτα as a protected designation of origin product. Thus, nowadays, you may find authentic Greek feta only in the European market.

This cheese works wonders in salads, although it’s often offered as an appetizer. In some places of Greece, it may also be fried and served with local honey. If you want a taste of Greek cuisine and have the chance to try this, don’t miss it!

A Carafe and Glass of Greek Ouzo Alcohol Spirit
  • Greek: ούζο
  • Romanization: úzo
  • Translation: “ouzo” traditional drink with alcohol

Ούζο is one of the most iconic alcoholic Greek drinks. It’s an aromatic, anise-flavored apéritif which is perfectly paired with seafood and small Greek appetizers called μεζέδες (mezédes), or “mezze.” It’s usually served with ice, and many locals dilute it with some water due to its strong taste and alcohol content.

3. Authentic Greek Gyros vs. Overseas Gyros

A Greek Gyro Dish
  • Greek: γύρος
  • Romanization: yíros
  • Translation: “Greek gyros” dish

Gyros is often thought to be Greece’s national dish!

In reality, gyros is only the most popular Greek fast-food item. The national dish of Greece is the white bean soup that we saw above. Gyros is either served on a plate or within a warm pita bread, along with onion, tomato, fried potatoes, and tzatziki sauce. 

In various countries abroad, many Greek restaurants offer gyros. However, more often than not, its flavor differs from that of the gyros in Greece. Originally, it’s made of thinly sliced or shaved pork or chicken meat that has been roasting in a vertical rotisserie—a roasting style that’s not very common outside of Greece. The meat quality, cut of meat, and seasoning also play important roles in giving Greek gyros its distinct taste and texture.

4. Food-Related Vocabulary

Here are some useful vocabulary words and phrases to help you describe your experience with Greek food: 

  • Greek: μαγειρεύω
  • Romanization: mayirévo
  • Translation: “to cook”
  • Greek: ελληνική κουζίνα
  • Romanization: elinikí kuzína
  • Translation: “Greek cuisine”
  • Greek: αλμυρό
  • Romanization: almiró
  • Translation: “savory” / “salty”
  • Greek: γλυκό (το) / γλυκό
  • Romanization: glikó
  • Translation: “dessert” / “sweet”
  • Greek: Θα ήθελα μια χωριάτικη σαλάτα, παρακαλώ.
  • Romanization: Tha íthela mia horiátiki saláta, parakaló.
  • Translation: “I would like a Greek salad, please.”
  • Greek: Η μπριζόλα συνοδεύεται από ρύζι ή από πατάτες;
  • Romanization: I brizóla sinodévete apó rízi í apó patátes?
  • Translation: “Does the steak come with rice or french fries?”

Do you want to expand your vocabulary a bit more?

We‘ve got you covered with our food-related vocab lists:


5. Simple Recipes to Make Authentic Greek Food at Home

You don’t need to be a chef to enjoy Greek food! 

Organize a Greek-themed night at home, ideally with a good Greek movie. Below, we’ll show you how to make Greek food at home! We’ve chosen two extra-simple yet tasty authentic Greek dishes we’re sure you’ll love.

A Bowl of Tzatziki

Photo by Nikodem Nijaki, under CC BY-SA 3.0

  • Greek: τζατζίκι
  • Romanization: tzatzíki
  • Ingredients: 2 medium cloves of garlic, 300g Greek yogurt, 1 cucumber, 2 tbsp olive oil, 2 tbsp vinegar or lemon juice, dill, salt, pepper
  • Recipe: Chop and smash the two cloves of garlic in a mortar. Grate the cucumber and add 1 tbsp of vinegar and some salt. Squeeze the cucumber with paper towels to drain its juices. Doing this ensures that the tzatziki won’t be too watery. In a bowl, add the Greek yogurt, the grated and drained cucumber, some freshly chopped dill, olive oil, a tbsp of vinegar, and some salt and pepper.
  • Bonus Tip: Serve it with french fries or pita bread, and you won’t regret it!

Traditional Greek Salad
  • Greek: χωριάτικη σαλάτα
  • Romanization: horiátiki saláta
  • Translation: rustic salad (also known as Greek salad)
  • Ingredients: 1 tomato, 1 red onion, 1 cucumber, 1 green pepper, 100g feta cheese, salt, pepper, oregano, olive oil
  • Recipe: Cut the vegetables into medium-sized pieces, according to your preferences. Season with a lot of olive oil, salt, pepper, and oregano. Add some cubes (or even a slice) of feta cheese on top.

6. Conclusion

I don’t know about you, but writing this article has made my mouth water!

Or, as we say in Greek: 

  • Greek: Μου τρέχουν τα σάλια!
  • Romanization: Mu tréhun ta sália!
  • Translation: “I’m drooling!” (Literally: “My saliva is running!”)

Of course, Greek cuisine is vast and we couldn’t possibly include everything. That said, we really tried to give you a well-rounded “taste.”  

Start learning Greek today in a consistent and organized manner by creating a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com. Tons of free vocabulary lists, YouTube videos, and grammar tips are waiting to be discovered.

In the meantime, have you tried any of these dishes? What’s your favorite Greek food?

Let us know in the comments below!

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Popular Sayings & Quotes in Greek

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Quotes are an essential part of every language, as they demonstrate how the local people perceive important things about life. With this in mind, we’ve prepared for you a comprehensive blog post on the most popular sayings and quotes in Greek.

Take a step closer to the Greek language and culture, and start using these quotes today.


Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Quotes About Success
  2. Quotes About Life
  3. Quotes About Time
  4. Quotes About Love
  5. Quotes About Family
  6. Quotes About Friendship
  7. Quotes About Food
  8. Quotes About Health
  9. Quotes About Language Learning
  10. Conclusion

1. Quotes About Success

A Happy Student Who Earned an A on an Essay

Who doesn’t want to be successful? Raise your hands, please!

Oh, I thought so… Anybody?

Here are some quotes about success in Greek to motivate you in your everyday life:

  • Greek: Για να πετύχεις στη ζωή χρειάζεσαι δύο πράγματα: άγνοια και αυτοπεποίθηση.
  • Romanization: Ya na petíhis sti zoí hriázese dío prágmata: ágnia ke aftopepíthisi.
  • Translation: “To succeed in life, you need two things: ignorance and confidence.”
  • Greek: Έχω αποτύχει ξανά και ξανά και ξανά στη ζωή μου και αυτός είναι ο λόγος που πετυχαίνω.
  • Romanization: Ého apotíhi xaná ke xaná ke xaná sti zoí mu ke aftós íne o lógos pu petihéno.
  • Translation: “I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life and that is why I succeed.”
  • Greek: Επιτυχημένος είναι ο άνθρωπος που μπορεί να θέσει σταθερά θεμέλια με τα τούβλα που οι άλλοι έχουν πετάξει πάνω του.
  • Romanization: Epitihiménos íne o ánthropos pu borí na thési statherá themélia me ta túvla pu i áli éhun petáxi páno tu.
  • Translation: “A successful man is one who can lay a firm foundation with the bricks others have thrown at him.”

Intrigued to learn more? Check out our vocabulary list of the Top 11 Quotes About Success in Greek

2. Quotes About Life

A Group of Students Smiling

Many ancient Greek philosophers have studied life and developed many theories about our whole existence. But this was just the beginning. Since then, many people worldwide have tried to decrypt the miracle of life from their point of view.

Here are some meaningful quotes in Greek concerning the phenomenon of life:   

  • Greek: Γίνε εσύ η αλλαγή που θες να δεις στον κόσμο.
  • Romanization: Yíne esí i alayí pu thes na dis ston kósmo.
  • Translation: “Be the change you want to see in the world.”
  • Greek: Η ευτυχία δεν είναι κάτι που παίρνουμε έτοιμο. Έρχεται μέσα από τις δικές μας πράξεις.
  • Romanization: Ι eftihía den íne káti pu pérnume étimo. Érhete mésa apó tis dikés mas práxis.
  • Translation: “Happiness is not something ready-made. It comes from your own actions.”
  • Greek: Δεν έχει σημασία το πόσο αργά προχωράς, αρκεί να μη σταματήσεις.
  • Romanization: Den éhi simasía to póso argá prohorás, arkí na mi stamatísis.
  • Translation: “It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop.”

If you need another dose of motivation, check out our full vocabulary list on the Top 10 Inspirational Quotes in Greek!

3. Quotes About Time

A Clock Showing Ten O’clock

Time passes by…even while you’re reading this blog post! Moments are gone forever and become precious memories. 

Below, you can find some of the most popular quotes about time in Greek:

  • Greek: Μην αφήνετε να περνά ο χρόνος χωρίς να βιώνετε τις στιγμές.
  • Romanization: Min afínete na perná o hrónos horís na viónete tis stigmés.
  • Translation: “Don’t let time pass by without living the moments.”
  • Greek: Μια αστραπή η ζωή μας, μα προλαβαίνουμε.
  • Romanization: Mia astrapí i zoí mas, ma prolavénume.
  • Translation: “Our life is (like) lightning, but we’re catching up.”
  • Greek: Το πρόβλημα είναι ότι νομίζετε πως έχετε χρόνο.
  • Romanization: To próvlima íne óti nomízete pos éhete hróno.
  • Translation: “The problem is that you think you have time.”

4. Quotes About Love

Four People Making a Heart Sign with Their Hands in the Air

Oh love… What’s more beautiful in this life than love?

Greek culture is purely based on loving each other: your family, your friends, your partners, and even your acquaintances. 

Here are some popular quotes about love in Greek:

  • Greek: Το να αγαπάς δεν είναι τίποτα. Το να σε αγαπούν είναι κάτι. Αλλά το να αγαπάς και να σε αγαπούν είναι τα πάντα.
  • Romanization: To na agapás den íne típota. To na se agapún íne káti. Alá to na agapás ke na se agapún íne ta pánda.
  • Translation: “To love is nothing. To be loved is something. But to love and be loved is everything.”
  • Greek: Είμαι πιο πολύ ο εαυτός μου όταν είμαι μαζί σου.
  • Romanization: Íme pio polí o eaftós mu ótan íme mazí su.
  • Translation: “I’m much more me when I’m with you.”
  • Greek: Σ’ ευχαριστώ που πάντα είσαι το ουράνιο τόξο μου μετά την καταιγίδα.
  • Romanization: S’ efharistó pu pánda íse to uránio tóxo mu metá tin kateyída.
  • Translation: “Thank you for always being my rainbow after the storm.”

Are you craving more romantic quotes in Greek? We thought so! GreekPod101 has you covered with our vocabulary list of Quotes About Love.

5. Quotes About Family

A Family of Four at the Supermarket

Greek family values are very strong. As such, many elements of Greek culture, ethics, and tradition are passed on from generation to generation. Within the same context, social life revolves around the family and the extended family. We could say that family is the core of Greek society.

Here are some popular quotes about family in Greek:

  • Greek: Η οικογένειά μου είναι η δύναμή μου και η αδυναμία μου.
  • Romanization: I ikoyéniá mu íne i dínamí mu ke i adinamía mu.
  • Translation: “My family is my strength and my weakness.”
  • Greek: Πρέπει να υπερασπίζεσαι την τιμή σου. Και την οικογένειά σου.
  • Romanization: Prépi na iperaspízese tin timí su. Ke tin ikoyéniá su.
  • Translation: “You have to defend your honor. And your family.”
  • Greek: Η οικογένεια είναι ένα από τα αριστουργήματα της φύσης.
  • Romanization: I ikoyénia íne éna apó ta aristuryímata tis físis.
  • Translation: “The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.”

Read through more quotes on our Top 10 Quotes About Family in Greek vocabulary list, and while you’re at it, learn the Must-Know Terms for Family Members.

6. Quotes About Friendship

A Group of Friends Having Fun

Friends are the family we choose. They play an invaluable role throughout our entire life. They hear our thoughts and offer us a brand-new perspective for every situation.

Below are some quotes about friendship in Greek that touch on this:

  • Greek: Το μεγαλύτερο δώρο της ζωής είναι η φιλία, και το έχω λάβει.
  • Romanization: To megalítero dóro tis zoís íne i filía ke to ého lávi.
  • Translation: “The greatest gift of life is friendship, and I have received it.”
  • Greek: Οι φίλοι δείχνουν την αγάπη τους στους δύσκολους καιρούς, όχι στην ευτυχία.
  • Romanization: I fíli díhnun tin agápi tus stus dískolus kerús, óhi stin eftihía.
  • Translation: “Friends show their love in times of trouble, not in happiness.”
  • Greek: Φίλος είναι κάποιος που σου δίνει πλήρη ελευθερία να είσαι ο εαυτός σου.
  • Romanization: Fílos íne kápios pu su díni plíri elefthería na íse o eaftós su.
  • Translation: “A friend is someone who gives you total freedom to be yourself.”

Also study our Top 10 Quotes About Friendship in Greek vocabulary list, and express your gratitude to your Greek friends! 

7. Quotes About Food

A Variety of Different Foods

We’re sure that you’ve at least heard of Greek cuisine. Some of you might have even tasted some Greek specialties in a taverna by the sea. Cooking is an integral part of Greek culture, so you’ll often hear people talking about food and exchanging recipes.

Let’s take a look at some quotes about food in Greek:

  • Greek: Η μαγειρική είναι ένα είδος ψυχοθεραπείας.
  • Romanization: I mayirikí íne éna ídos psihotherapíasi.
  • Translation: “Cooking is a form of psychotherapy.”
  • Greek: Το πρωινό είναι το σημαντικότερο γεύμα της ημέρας.
  • Romanization: To proinó íne to simadikótero yévma tis iméras.
  • Translation: “Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.”
  • Greek: Μια ισορροπημένη διατροφή μπορεί να προσφέρει πολλά οφέλη για την υγεία.
  • Romanization: Mia isoropiméni diatrofí borí na prosféri pollá oféli ya tin iyía.
  • Translation: “A balanced diet can offer plenty of benefits for the health.”

Interested in learning more about Greek cuisine? Visit our vocabulary lists on the most popular Greek foods and the top 10 foods to help you live longer

8. Quotes About Health

A Doctor and a Patient During a Medical Consultation

The ancient Greek physician Hippocrates is thought of as the Father of Modern Medicine. We can say that Greeks value health above any other commodity in life. 

It’s not a coincidence, after all, that in Greek we say Γεια σου! (Ya su!) to say Hello! This word stems from υγεία (iyía), meaning health. So, every time you greet someone, you wish for them to be healthy at the same time!

Since Hippocrates’s time, medicine has flourished, leading to more and more people perceiving health as the ultimate commodity. Therefore, talking about health is part of our everyday lives.

Let’s take a look at some quotes about health in Greek:

  • Greek: Όποιος έχει υγεία μπορεί να έχει δύναμη και ελπίδα. Και όποιος έχει αυτά, έχει τα πάντα.
  • Romanization: Ópios éhi iyía borí na éhi dínami ke elpída. Ke ópios éhi aftá, éhi ta pánda.
  • Translation: “Whoever has health may have strength and hope. And whoever has those, has everything.”
  • Greek: Το γέλιο κάνει καλό στην υγεία.
  • Romanization: To yélio káni kaló stin iyía.
  • Translation: “Laughter is good for the health.”
  • Greek: Αποφάσισα να είμαι ευτυχισμένος επειδή κάνει καλό στην υγεία.
  • Romanization: Apofásisa na íme eftihisménos epidí káni kaló stin iyía.
  • Translation: “I’ve decided to be happy because it is good for my health.”

9. Quotes About Language Learning

A Woman Studying and Thinking about What to Write

Did you know that more than half of Greeks speak English? Indeed, language learning is integrated within the Greek educational system, with many people learning other languages as well, including German, French, Italian, and Spanish. 

What better way to motivate you in your own language studies than to close our article with quotes about language learning in Greek?

  • Greek: Μια νέα γλώσσα είναι μια νέα ζωή.
  • Romanization: Mia néa glósa íne mia néa zoí.
  • Translation: “A new language is a new life.”
  • Greek: Τα όρια της γλώσσας μου είναι τα όρια του κόσμου μου.
  • Romanization: Ta ória tis glósas mu íne ta ória tu kósmu mu.
  • Translation: “The limits of my language are the limits of my world.”
  • Greek: Δεν θα μπορείς να καταλάβεις ποτέ μία γλώσσα, αν δεν καταλαβαίνεις τουλάχιστον δύο.
  • Romanization: Den tha borís na katalávis poté mía glósa, an den katalavénis tuláhiston dío.
  • Translation: “You can never understand one language until you understand at least two.”

If you’re interested in learning more, check out our vocabulary list on Language Learning Quotes.

10. Conclusion

In this blog post, we tried to present in Greek some of the most popular quotes and sayings. By studying them, you’ll gain more fluency and be able to understand the Greek language to a greater extent.

Have you heard of any other quote in Greek that we didn’t include above?

Please let us know in the comments; we always love hearing from you!

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A Comprehensive Guide to Greek Business Phrases

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If you’re learning Greek for business purposes or if you’re thinking about relocating to Greece for work, then you’re definitely in the right place! In this article, we’ll outline the most common business phrases in Greek for a variety of situations.

Greece might have undergone a huge financial crisis, but now it’s time to thrive. Many people from all over the world have decided to relocate to Greece in order to enjoy a slower pace of life, along with kind-hearted people, plenty of sunshine, and magnificent islands.

Every language has its own code of ethics when it comes to business. Learning Greek is one thing, but learning all the appropriate ways to interact within a business environment is another. And we’re here to help you master business Greek, in word and action!

In this blog post, you’ll learn all the basics and much more, from nailing your job interview to interacting with your coworkers and handling everyday tasks in your new office.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Business Words and Phrases in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Nailing a Job Interview
  2. Interacting with Coworkers
  3. Sounding Smart in a Meeting
  4. Handling Business Phone Calls & Emails
  5. Going on a Business Trip
  6. Conclusion

1. Nailing a Job Interview

Job Interview

A job interview is always a stressful procedure, especially when it’s conducted in a language other than your mother tongue.

Following is some useful Greek for business interviews. Of course, you can adjust these phrases according to your studies or experience. 

What are you waiting for? Just put a bright smile on and shine!

  • Greek: Γεια σας, ονομάζομαι [Όνομα] [Επίθετο].
  • Romanization: Ya sas, onomázome [Ónoma] [Epítheto].
  • Translation: “Hello, my name is [Name] [Last Name].”
  • Greek: Έχω σπουδάσει Πληροφορική στο Πανεπιστήμιο Μακεδονίας στη Θεσσαλονίκη.
  • Romanization: Ého spudási Pliroforikí sto Panepistímio Makedonías sti Thesaloníki.
  • Translation: “I have studied informatics at the University of Macedonia in Thessaloniki.” 
  • Greek: Έχω προϋπηρεσία σε μια μικρή εταιρεία πληροφορικής.
  • Romanization: Ého proipiresía se mia mikrí etería pliroforikís.
  • Translation: “I have professional experience in a small informatics company.” 
  • Greek: Εκεί εργάστηκα για πέντε χρόνια ως αναλυτής.
  • Romanization: Ekí ergástika ya pénde hrónia os analitís.
  • Translation: “I worked there for five years as an analyst.” 
  • Greek: Είμαι πολύ εργατικός και οργανωτικός.
  • Romanization: Íme polí ergatikós ke organotikós.
  • Translation: “I am very hard-working and organized.” 
  • Greek: Σας ευχαριστώ πολύ για αυτήν την ευκαιρία!
  • Romanization: Sas efharistó poli ya aftín tin efkería!
  • Translation: “Thank you very much for this opportunity!” 
  • Greek: Με συγχωρείτε, μήπως μπορείτε να επαναλάβετε;
  • Romanization: Me sighoríte, mípos boríte na epanalávete?
  • Translation: “Excuse me, could you please repeat?” 

If you feel like expanding your business vocabulary, check out our video Learn Greek Business Language in 15 Minutes below, or study with our article on How to Introduce Yourself in Greek!

2. Interacting with Coworkers

A Woman among Many Colleagues

Interacting with colleagues is an integral part of your professional life. While doing business in Greece, it’s an opportunity to collaborate, get to know new people, and—why not?—make some new friends.

Here’s your cheat sheet for interacting with coworkers:

  • Greek: Γεια σας, είμαι ο/η [Όνομα]. Είμαι ο/η καινούριος/-α σας συνάδελφος. Χαίρω πολύ!
  • Romanization: Ya sas, íme o/i [Ónoma]. Íme o/i kenúrios/-a sas sinádelfos. Héro polí!
  • Translation: “Hello, I am [Name]. I am your new coworker. Nice to meet you!” 
  • Greek: Μήπως μπορείς να με βοηθήσεις, σε παρακαλώ;
  • Romanization: Mípos borís na me voithísis, se parakaló?
  • Translation: “Could you please help me?” 
  • Greek: Συγγνώμη που άργησα.
  • Romanization: Signómi pu áryisa.
  • Translation: “Sorry for being late.” 
  • Greek: Είμαι πολύ αγχωμένος για αυτήν την παρουσίαση.
  • Romanization: Íme polí anhoménos ya aftín tin parusíasi.
  • Translation: “I am very stressed about this presentation.” 
  • Greek: Σήμερα είχα πολλή δουλειά και είμαι κουρασμένος.
  • Romanization: Símera íha polí duliá ke íme kurazménos.
  • Translation: “Today I’ve had a lot of work and I am tired.” 
  • Greek: Θέλεις να πάμε για καφέ μετά τη δουλειά;
  • Romanization: Thélis na páme ya kafé metá ti duliá?
  • Translation: “Would you like to grab a cup of coffee after work?” 

3. Sounding Smart in a Meeting

A Business Meeting from Above

Business meetings are where all the magic happens; they’re a celebration of collaboration and new ideas! We’re sure you want to be an active member of the group, so we’ve compiled a list of phrases that feature Greek business terms you’ll likely hear and use in meetings:

  • Greek: Οι πωλήσεις φαίνεται να αυξήθηκαν κατά το τελευταίο τρίμηνο.
  • Romanization: I polísis fénete na afxíthikan katá to teleftéo trímino.
  • Translation: “Sales seem to have increased during the last trimester.” 
  • Greek: Συμφωνώ απόλυτα με αυτό.
  • Romanization: Simfonó apólita me aftó.
  • Translation: “I totally agree with this.” 
  • Greek: Συγγνώμη, αλλά δεν συμφωνώ με αυτό.
  • Romanization: Signómi, alá den simfonó me aftó.
  • Translation: “Sorry, but I don’t agree with this.” 
  • Greek: Θα μπορούσαμε να το συζητήσουμε αυτό αργότερα;
  • Romanization: Tha borúsame na to sizitísume aftó argótera?
  • Translation: “Could we discuss this later?” 
  • Greek: Σας ευχαριστώ για την προσοχή σας!
  • Romanization: Sas efharisó ya tin prosohí sas!
  • Translation: “Thank you for your attention!” 

Are you wondering how a Greek business meeting might sound? Here is our related Listening Lesson on Preparing for a Business Meeting

Business Phrases

4. Handling Business Phone Calls & Emails

A Man Taking a Business Phone Call and Taking Notes

When making a business call in Greek, it’s very important to address your interlocutor politely. In Greek, it’s common practice to address everyone using the honorific plural (i.e. second person plural, instead of second person singular). 

That being said, here are some of the most popular Greek business phrases when making a phone call:

  • Greek: [Επωνυμία Εταιρείας], λέγετε παρακαλώ. (Answering a work phone)
  • Romanization: [Eponimía Eterías], léyete parakaló.
  • Translation: “This is [Name of the Business].” (lit. “[Name of the Business], please speak.”) 
  • Greek: Καλημέρα σας, ονομάζομαι [Όνομα] [Επίθετο]. (Answering a work phone)
  • Romanization: Kaliméra sas, onomázome [Ónoma] [Epítheto].
  • Translation: “Good morning, my name is [Name] [Last Name].” 
  • Greek: Πώς μπορώ να σας βοηθήσω;
  • Romanization: Pós boró na sas voithíso?
  • Translation: “How may I help you?” 
  • Greek: Σας ευχαριστούμε που καλέσατε!
  • Romanization: Sas efharistúme pu kalésate!
  • Translation: “Thank you for calling!” 
  • Greek: O κ. Παπαδόπουλος απουσιάζει αυτήν την στιγμή.
  • Romanization: O kírios Papadópulos apusiázi aftín tin stigmí.
  • Translation: “Mr. Papadopoulos is not here at the moment.” 
  • Greek: Θα θέλατε να αφήσετε κάποιο μήνυμα;
  • Romanization: Tha thélate na afísete kápio mínima?
  • Translation: “Would you like to leave a message?” 

Sending emails is also a big part of everyday business life. Therefore, we’ve decided to include how you would begin and end a business email:

  • Greek: Αξιότιμε/Αγαπητέ κ. Παπαδόπουλε, ……
  • Romanization: Axiótime/Agapité k. Papadópule, ………..
  • Translation: “Dear Mr. Papadopoulos, ………” 
  • Greek: Αξιότιμη/Αγαπητή κ. Παπαδοπούλου, ……
  • Romanization: Axiótimi/Agapití k. Papadopúlu, ………..
  • Translation: “Dear Mrs. Papadopoulos, ………” 
  • Greek: Με εκτίμηση, ……
  • Romanization: Me ektímisi, ………..
  • Translation: “Sincerely, ………”

Keep in mind that in written Greek, after a greeting line such as the ones above, we use a comma after it and continue with a word in lowercase on the line below.

5. Going on a Business Trip

Two Colleagues being at the Airport during a Business Trip

Last but not least, here are some useful phrases which can be lifesavers during a business trip:

  • Greek: Θα ήθελα ένα κάνω μια κράτηση για ένα δίκλινο δωμάτιο από τις 25 έως τις 27 Απριλίου.
  • Romanization: Tha íthela na káno mia krátisi ya éna díklino domátio apó tis íkosi pénde éos tis íkosi eftá Aprilíu.
  • Translation: “I would like to make a reservation for a double room from the 25th until the 27th of April.” 
  • Greek: Στις 8 Ιουνίου θα λείπω σε επαγγελματικό ταξίδι.
  • Romanization: Stis ohtó Iuníu tha lípo se epangelmatikó taxídi.
  • Translation: “On the 8th of June, I will be on a business trip.” 
  • Greek: Σας ευχαριστώ πολύ για τη φιλοξενία!
  • Romanization: Sas efharistó polí ya ti filoxenía!
  • Translation: “Thank you very much for the hospitality!” 
  • Greek: Θα ήθελα ένα εισιτήριο για την πρώτη πρωινή πτήση της Παρασκευής.
  • Romanization: Tha íthela éna isitírio ya tin próti proiní ptísi tis Paraskevís.
  • Translation: “I would like a ticket for the first morning flight on Friday.” 

For more useful phrases related to travel, check out the following vocabulary lists on GreekPod101.com:

Jobs

6. Conclusion

Learning Greek is often a prerequisite to job hunting in Greece, especially when it comes to professions that require everyday interaction with clients. In addition, remember to always be polite and address others in the honorific plural.

If you’re contemplating finding a job in Greece, check out our guide on How to Find a Job in Greece. There, you’ll find everything you need to know about job hunting in Greece, including where to search for job ads on popular local websites. 

On the other hand, if you feel like digging into business Greek a bit more, here are some relevant lessons on GreekPod101.com: 

In the meantime, is there a Greek business phrase that troubles you? 

Feel free to let us know in the comments!

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Learn Greek: YouTube Channels to Improve Your Greek Skills

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If you’ve been thinking about ways to improve your Greek, then you’re in the right place! We have the perfect solution for learners who want to supplement their studies with a bit of entertainment: watch Greek YouTube channels! 

YouTube has become an integral part of our lives, mainly for entertainment purposes. However, over the past few years, the video streaming channel has also revolutionized education. Many teachers have decided to offer educational videos on this modern medium, which allows them to combine their teaching process with helpful visuals and explanations. 

Another important advantage of YouTube is its accessibility. People from all over the world can easily access an unprecedented number of videos and literally find anything they need to learn. 

You may be glad to know that GreekPod101 has its own YouTube channel. We offer exclusive educational videos which offer complete and ready-to-use knowledge about the Greek language, from the basics to more specific subjects. 

But while we may have the best Greek learning YouTube channel, we understand that everyone has different tastes. That’s why we’ve included channels in a variety of categories, from comedy to science and plenty of things in-between!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Zouzounia TV
  2. Visit Greece
  3. SKAI.gr
  4. Dionysis Atzarakis
  5. Giorgos Vagiatas
  6. Astronio
  7. Καθημερινή Φυσική
  8. Ευτύχης Μπλέτσας
  9. Learn Greek with GreekPod101.com
  10. Conclusion

1. Zouzounia TV

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Zouzounia TVChildren’s Songs & CartoonsBeginnerΗ Καμήλα

When you think about combining your Greek studies with entertainment, children’s songs and cartoons might not be the first thing to come to mind—but they work wonders for beginners. 

Here are some significant benefits that children’s songs offer: 

  • They use simple Greek vocabulary and sentences
  • They are obviously the best choice for involving your children in your Greek learning process
  • They have catchy melodies, making it easier to remember the lyrics

More specifically, Zouzounia TV is one of the largest YouTube channels in this category.

The word Ζουζούνια (Zuzúnia) literally means “Bugs.” However, it’s a popular Greek word that’s often used to refer to young children in a cute way.

Here’s an example of what a caring Greek mother might say to her young child:

  • Greek: Ζουζούνι μου, θέλεις κι άλλο χυμό;
  • Romanization: Zuzúni mu, thélis ki állo himó?
  • Meaning: “My sweet little bug, do you want some more juice?”

The channel includes Greek songs, often with subtitles. The videos are designed to help children learn proper Greek, but those who are just starting their Greek language learning journey can make good use of it, too! 

2. Visit Greece

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Visit GreeceTravelAbsolute BeginnerUnlock Your Senses in Cyclades

So, you’ve decided to learn Greek…. But there are days when you feel exhausted or procrastination takes over, and you need a little push to stay focused and motivated.

The Visit Greece channel is exactly what you need! This official YouTube channel is run by the Greek Ministry of Tourism and features the most wonderful aspects of Greece. Get lost in a virtual travel experience and learn more about the fascinating Greek culture.

This channel is perfect for absolute beginners, since you can dive into the beauties of Greece and Greek culture with no prior knowledge of the language. 

3. SKAI.gr

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
SKAI.grNews, Shows, Cooking, TravelBeginner – IntermediateΓεύσεις Στη Φύση

SKAI is a major news channel in Greece, offering one of the most popular and diverse Greek news YouTube channels. Here you can enjoy a wide range of genres, ranging from The Skai News coverage of the latest news to popular reality shows. 

If you know the Greek basics, we think you’ll find this channel highly beneficial. 

4. Dionysis Atzarakis

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Dionysis AtzarakisMovies & HumorIntermediate – AdvancedΜια γνώμη για το τέλος του Game of Thrones

What happens when a Greek comedian decides to review movies and series? 

Dionysis Atzarakis has brought to all of us Cinelthete, a Greek show where popular Hollywood movies get roasted. However, he’s not alone in this journey, as he joins forces with his good friend Thomas Zabras, another talented standup comedian. The result is a mix of elegant humor and short impersonation sessions. 

Once again, to get the most enjoyment from this Greek comedy YouTube channel, you should have an intermediate language level or higher. 

5. Giorgos Vagiatas

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Giorgos VagiatasStandup Comedy, TravelIntermediate – AdvancedTop 10 Κατοικιδίων

A group of friends decides to cross Europe in an RV, starting from Serres in Greece and reaching the Gibraltar peninsula, and record their adventures. An innovative idea, which became a beloved series for many Greek fans.

Η εκπομπή με το τροχόσπιτο (RV there yet?), meaning “The show with the motorhome,” will travel you through Europe’s southern shores, featuring many major cities like Florence, Monaco, and Cannes—all the way to Gibraltar. If you love travel and culture, this is the Greek language YouTube channel for you!

However, Giorgos Vagiatas has also released another popular series of videos, featuring Top 10 lists from his unique point of view. 

6. Astronio

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
AstronioPopular Science & AstrophysicsIntermediate – AdvancedΗ Ζωή Στο Ηλιακό Σύστημα

Pavlos Kastanas, a young Greek astrophysicist and science lecturer made a decision: he created Astronio, a YouTube channel focusing on astrophysics. His goal was to explain various science-related phenomena in plain language without skimping on important facts.

On this YouTube channel, you can treat your curiosity with accurate answers to the questions that wander around your head at night:

Astronio, the ultimate Greek YouTube channel for astrophysics-lovers, answers these questions and many more! 

7. Καθημερινή Φυσική

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Καθημερινή ΦυσικήPopular Science & FactsIntermediateΘεωρία Παιγνίων: Το δίλημμα του φυλακισμένου

Channels about popular science are now a trend in Greece, we get it!

So, what’s so special about this one?

Well, Καθημερινή Φυσική (Kathimeriní Fisikí), or “Everyday Science,” uses thoughtful cartoons in order to explain nearly everything that’s happening around us. Plus, the language used is slightly easier compared to that of other YouTube channels with similar themes. 

8. Ευτύχης Μπλέτσας

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Ευτύχης ΜπλέτσαςTravelIntermediateHappy Traveller στην Ικαρία

Over the past four years, Eftihis, along with his wife Helektra and their dog Hercules, travel the world and share with viewers lovely travel tips for experiencing each destination like a local. He also shows appreciation for good food and nature.

Having visited more than fifty countries all over the world, he has grown to be a travel expert, always searching for new experiences.

Join Eftihis in this unique journey and practice your Greek listening skills!

Their show, Happy Traveller, is also broadcasted by one of the major Greek TV channels, SKAI

9. Learn Greek with GreekPod101.com

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Learn Greek with GreekPod101.comEducation, Language LearningAbsolute Beginner – AdvancedLearn Greek in 30 Minutes: ALL the Basics You Need

Looking for a pure educational approach to the Greek language?

Then you’re already in the right place!

The GreekPod101.com channel on YouTube offers tons of free educational videos to take your Greek to the next level.  

Start learning today:

And many, many more!

Regardless of your level, the GreekPod101 YouTube channel will definitely add to your knowledge! 

10. Conclusion

What’s your favorite Greek YouTube channel? Did you have the chance to take a look at any of the ones above? Let us know in the comments below!

Learning is about so much more than traditional methods. It’s everywhere around us, even on YouTube! Take advantage of this opportunity and get to know Greek culture through the numerous Greek videos available. 

Start learning Greek today in a consistent and organized manner by creating a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com. Tons of free vocabulary lists, YouTube videos, and grammar tips are waiting for you to discover.

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How to Say Goodbye in Greek

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Goodbyes aren’t easy. 

Saying goodbye is a heartfelt and difficult process, but it’s an integral part of everyday life. The good news is that we’re here to make it easier for you. 

If you’ve ever wondered how to say goodbye in Greek, then you’re in the right place! After reading this article, you’ll be able to say goodbye in any situation.

Before we continue, let’s refresh ourselves on the basics, shall we?

Start with a bonus, and download the Must-Know Beginner Vocabulary PDF for FREE!(Logged-In Member Only)

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. The Most Common Ways to Say Goodbye
  2. Specific Ways to Say Goodbye
  3. Saying Goodbye Based on the Time of Day
  4. Foreign Goodbye Words
  5. Greek Gestures for Saying Goodbye
  6. Conclusion

1. The Most Common Ways to Say Goodbye

Most Common Goodbyes

In this section, we’ll present you with the most common ways to say goodbye in Greek. These are simple, short, and versatile phrases that you can use in both writing and speech. 

  • Greek: Γεια!
  • Romanization: Ya!
  • Translation: “Hello!” / “Bye!”

This is definitely the easiest and safest option available. Γεια! can mean either “Hello!” or “Bye!” This one fits well in both formal and informal situations. 

  • Greek: Αντίο!
  • Romanization: Adío!
  • Translation: “Goodbye!”

We could say that αντίο is the original Greek word for “goodbye.” It’s typically used when you won’t be seeing the other person for a long time., so it can sound a little bit dramatic. However, it can easily be used in both formal and informal settings.  

  • Greek: Εις το επανιδείν!
  • Romanization: Is to epanidín!
  • Translation: “Till we meet again!”

The thing is, you won’t hear much of this phrase in everyday encounters. Since it derives from Ancient Greek, this phrase has a sense of formality. Nevertheless, its meaning is not that formal, so it’s not typically used in business settings. It could be an ideal parting phrase when you want to say goodbye to a friend that you’ll see again after a long period of time. 

  • Greek: Τα λέμε!
  • Romanization: Ta léme!
  • Translation: “We will talk (later)!”

Do you feel like saying goodbye casually? Then Τα λέμε! is perfect! This is a common informal phrase which corresponds well to “Talk to you later!”

  • Greek: Φιλάκια! [Informal Only]
  • Romanization: Filákia!
  • Translation: “Kisses!”

This phrase is used only between close friends and couples. You wouldn’t send kisses to your boss, after all, would you? Φιλάκια is how the Greek say bye in a very friendly manner, and it’s more common in oral speech than in writing.

2. Specific Ways to Say Goodbye

A Woman in Front of a Train Waving Goodbye

In this section, we’ve gathered more-specific ways to say goodbye in Greek. Here, you’ll find complete sentences for a wide variety of occasions. 

  • Greek: Τα λέμε αύριο στις επτά.
  • Romanization: Ta léme ávrio stis eptá.
  • Translation: “We will talk tomorrow at seven.”

This is one way to say goodbye while dropping a reminder about your upcoming appointment at the same time. It can be used in both formal and informal conversations. 

  • Greek: Να προσέχεις.
  • Romanization: Na proséhis.
  • Translation: “Take care.”

What’s sweeter than saying goodbye and expressing your affection at the same time? This phrase is most commonly used by parents toward their children, as well as between people who deeply love each other. 

  • Greek: Δυστυχώς πρέπει να φύγω.
  • Romanization: Distihós prépi na fígo.
  • Translation: “Unfortunately, I have to go.”

Leaving a party early? No problem! Just say: Δυστυχώς πρέπει να φύγω. However, I warn you: Greeks are so hospitable that they will rigorously try to change your mind so that you’ll stay a little longer. 

  • Greek: Στο καλό!
  • Romanization: Sto kaló!
  • Translation: “Go to a good place!” / “Have a good journey!”

This is how to say bye in Greek when someone is about to leave for an excursion or journey. Greek mothers tend to say this phrase to their children, even if they’re just leaving to go to work. It shows a sense of caring for the other person. 

  • Greek: Θα τα πούμε!
  • Romanization: Tha ta púme!
  • Translation: “We will talk!”

This is just a casual farewell that can be said between friends, and generally in informal settings. 

  • Greek: Θα είμαστε σε επικοινωνία. [Formal]
  • Romanization: Tha ímaste se epikinonía.
  • Translation: “We will keep in touch.”

When you arrange something in a formal setting that will need further communication in the future, it’s suitable to say: Θα είμαστε σε επικοινωνία. This indicates that you’ll get in touch again soon.  

3. Saying Goodbye Based on the Time of Day

A Man Leaving for Work and Saying Goodbye to His Family

Depending on the time of day, you can use one of the following phrases as an alternative to saying goodbye. 

  • Greek: Καλό βράδυ!
  • Romanization: Kaló vrádi!
  • Translation: “Have a good evening!”
  • Greek: Καληνύχτα!
  • Romanization: Kaliníhta!
  • Translation: “Goodnight!”
  • Greek: Καλό απόγευμα!
  • Romanization: Kaló apógevma!
  • Translation: “Have a good afternoon!”
  • Greek: Καλή συνέχεια!
  • Romanization: Kalí sinéhia!
  • Translation: “Have a good rest of the day!”

At this point, we should note that Καλή συνέχεια! can be used all day long, regardless of the time.

4. Foreign Goodbye Words

A Young Woman Waving Goodbye to a Couple of Friends

Many words from other languages have been integrated into Greek. Youngsters tend to use these words, as it’s regarded as a modern behavior. Below, you’ll find the most common foreign words for saying goodbye in Greek.

  • Greek: Μπάι!
  • Romanization: Bái!
  • Translation: “Bye!”
  • Greek: Τσάο!
  • Romanization: Tsáo!
  • Translation: “Ciao!”

5. Greek Gestures for Saying Goodbye

A Woman Waving Goodbye

Greeks are very passionate and expressive people. Therefore, they utilize body language and a variety of gestures while they talk. But, which gestures do they use while saying goodbye?

  • Hugs & Kisses: We’ve just said that Greeks are very warm and passionate, remember? Well, it’s common to hug each other and kiss each cheek when saying goodbye to a very close friend or family member. Please keep in mind that this gesture is strictly informal, and each person might set different boundaries, so just play along if the other person initiates this gesture. It’s best to be on the safe side and avoid misunderstandings. 
  • Shaking Hands: This is the ultimate formal Greek gesture. While leaving a meeting, shake hands with the people you’ve met. This indicates that you’re really glad for the encounter and that you really appreciate the other person. 
  • Waving Goodbye: This is the most common gesture. Just wave goodbye by raising your hand with your fingers close together and your palm facing the other person. 
  • Waving a White Handkerchief: This is a traditional Greek way to say goodbye, even without talking. The days before disposable napkins were in mass production, each person had his/her own handkerchief, which served a variety of purposes. Most of the time, it was used for personal hygiene. 

Around 1920-1930, many Greeks were employed as seamen. After visiting their families—usually once or twice during the year—it was time to go back to the ship. Their wives used to follow them to the port in order to say goodbye. The men embarking would stand on the deck, staring at their loved ones left behind. As the ship departed and the shore was getting farther and farther away, women used to grab their white handkerchiefs and wave them in the air to say goodbye. Waving a white handkerchief was way more visible than simply waving their empty hands. 

That’s how this gesture was integrated into Greek culture. To be honest, you’ll rarely see this gesture in Greece anymore, but when you do, you’re probably looking at a very romantic couple. 

6. Conclusion

Saying goodbye in Greek isn’t that hard, is it? 

Actually, saying bye in the Greek language is very similar to doing so in English.

In this article, we’ve tried to demonstrate a wide range of the most common ways to say goodbye in Greek, and we hope this guide can be useful for every learner, regardless of their level. To see even more goodbye words and phrases, and to hear their pronunciations, you can study our vocabulary list of the Most Common Ways to Say Goodbye.

We’d love to hear from you in the comments. We’re curious:

  • What’s your favorite way to say goodbye in Greek?
  • Do you use gestures?

Start learning Greek today in a consistent and organized manner by creating a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com. Tons of free vocabulary lists, YouTube videos, and grammar tips are waiting for you. 

In the meantime, was there a phrase or a sentence that troubled you? If you have any questions, let us know in the comments and we’d be happy to help!

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All About Greek Pronouns: Ultimate Greek Pronouns List

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Pronouns are such useful little words! They normally substitute nouns, making written and verbal language less boring by enhancing their flow. 

If we could choose one thing to begin studying when you first start learning any new language, it would probably be its pronouns. They’re so useful that you’d find it difficult to construct a full sentence in any language without using them. 

In Greek, as in English, the pronouns are divided into various categories. So, in this article, we’ll demonstrate all the tips and tricks about personal, demonstrative, interrogative, and indefinite Greek pronouns, setting the base for your further studies.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Personal Pronouns in Greek
  2. Demonstrative Pronouns in Greek
  3. Interrogative Pronouns in Greek
  4. Indefinite Pronouns in Greek
  5. Relative Pronouns in Greek
  6. Conclusion

1. Personal Pronouns in Greek

An Owl Pointing at Another Owl

Image Description: An owl pointing at another owl

One of the first things you need to know when you begin studying the Greek language is the use of Greek personal pronouns. From a syntax perspective, personal pronouns are most commonly used as a subject or an object within a sentence. Therefore, it’s almost impossible to engage in a simple dialogue without them.

Let’s have a look at some Greek pronouns in the nominative case, which can be used as a subject within a sentence.

  • εγώ (egó) — “I”
  • εσύ (esí) — “you”
  • αυτός (aftós) — “he”
  • αυτή (aftí) — “she”
  • αυτό (aftó) — “it”
  • εμείς (emís) — “we”
  • εσείς (esís) — “you”
  • αυτοί (aftí) — “they” (masculine)
  • αυτές (aftés) — “they” (feminine)
  • αυτά (aftá) — “they” (neutral)

As you might have noticed, there are three different third-person forms of the personal pronoun in plural, according to the gender of the name or noun that’s substituted. Indeed, when the word that’s substituted is masculine, for example άνδρες (ándres), meaning men, then αυτοί should be used. Similarly, when the word is feminine, for example γυναίκες (ginékes), meaning “women,” then αυτές should be used. Last, but not least, when the word is neutral, for example παιδιά (pediá), meaning “children,” then αυτά should be used.

Now, let’s study some more-complex example sentences, which demonstrate the use of Greek personal pronouns in the nominative case.

Examples:

Greek: Εμείς μένουμε στο ξενοδοχείο, Ελένη. Εσείς που μένετε;

Romanization: Emís ménume sto xenodohío, Eléni. Esís pu ménete?

Translation: “We are staying at the hotel, Eleni. Where are you staying?”

Greek: Αυτοί θέλουν να πάνε σε μια ταβέρνα, όμως εμείς θέλουμε να πάμε για μπάνιο.

Romanization: Aftí thélun na páne se mia tavérna, ómos emís thélume na páme ya bánio.

Translation: “They want to go to a restaurant, but we want to go swimming.”

Greek: Τα παιδιά φορούσαν ελληνικές παραδοσιακές στολές και χόρευαν. Αυτά φαίνονταν πολύ χαρούμενα.

Romanization: Ta pediá forúsan ellinikés paradosiakés stolés ke hórevan. Aftá fénodan polí harúmena.

Translation: “Children were wearing traditional Greek suits and were dancing. They seemed very happy.”

Note that in sentences like in the example above, the pronoun Αυτά (Aftá) can also be omitted when it’s understood by the context whom we’re talking about. While in English, it’s indispensable to use the pronoun “they,” in Greek, it can be omitted. This is because the form of the verb indicates what person we’re talking about, in this case the third-person plural.

A characteristic of these pronouns is that they can stand alone in speech, just like in the second sentence of the following example.

Greek: 

  • Ποιος θα πάει να φέρει ψωμί; 
  • Εγώ.

Romanization: 

  • Pios tha pái na féri psomí? 
  • Egó.

Translation: 

  • “Who’s going to get some bread?” 
  • “I will.”
Introducing Yourself


Now, what happens when we need to use these personal pronouns as the object of a verb within a sentence? The answer lies below, where the Greek personal pronouns are demonstrated in the objective cases, that is the accusative case (used more often for objects) and the genitive case (used less often for objects) accordingly.

  • εμένα (eména) — “me” in both cases
  • εσένα (eséna) — “you” in both cases
  • αυτόν (aftón) / αυτού (aftú) — “him”
  • αυτή(ν) (aftí(n)) / αυτής (aftís) — “her”
  • αυτό (aftó) / αυτού (aftú) — “it”
  • εμάς (emás) — “us” in both cases
  • εσάς (esás) — “you” in both cases
  • αυτούς (aftús) / αυτών (aftón) — “them” (masculine)
  • αυτές (aftés) / αυτών (aftón) — “them” (feminine)
  • αυτά (aftá) / αυτών (aftón) — “them” (neutral)

Examples: 

Greek: Η γυναίκα είπε αυτής να φύγει.

Romanization: I yinéka ípe aftís na fíyi.

Translation: “The woman told her to leave.”

Greek: Μην ακούς αυτούς. Εμένα να ακούς.

Romanization: Min akús aftús. Eména na akús.

Translation: “Don’t listen to them. Listen to me.”

Greek: Ο διευθυντής επέλεξε εμένα, για να κάνω αυτή τη δουλειά.

Romanization: O diefthindís epélexe eména, ya na káno aftí ti duliá.

Translation: “The director chose me to do this job.”

Greek: Ποιον επέλεξε; Εμένα.

Romanization: Pion epélexe? Eména.

Translation: “Whom did he choose? Me.”

As you can see in the second sentence of the last example, these pronouns can also stand alone in speech. The forms of the personal pronouns that we saw are called “strong” forms for that reason—they’re strong enough to maintain themselves alone in a sentence. They’re also called “emphatic,” as they’re used to emphasize a specific person as opposed to someone else. (“He chose me. Not someone else.”)

You might be wondering that since there are strong forms of the Greek personal pronouns, there might be “weak” forms as well. Well, there are, and these are used more often in speech but never alone; they need a verb to sustain themselves. In the accusative and genitive cases respectively, those are:

  • με (me) / μου (mu) — “me”
  • σε (se) / σου (su) — “you”
  • τον (ton) / του (tu) — “him”
  • τη(ν) (tin(n)) / της (tis) — “her”
  • το (to) / του (tu) — “it”
  • μας (mas) / μας (mas) — “us”
  • σας (sas) / σας (sas) — “you”
  • τους (tus) / τους (tus) — “them”
  • τις  or τες* (tis or tes) / τους (tus) — “them”
  • τα (ta) / τους (tus) — “them”


* τις is used before a verb, τες after a verb.

Greek: Σε βλέπω!

Romanization: Se vlépo!

Translation: “I see you!”

Greek: Της μιλάει.

Romanization: Tis milái.

Translation: “He is talking to her.”

However, what happens when we need to express possession? Then, we use the above weak personal pronouns in the genitive case to create Greek possessive pronouns:

Greek: Το φαγητό μου.

Romanization: To fayitó mu.

Translation: “My food.”

Greek: Αυτό είναι το σπίτι σας.

Romanization: Aftó íne to spíti sas.

Translation: “This is your house.”

To make these weak possessive forms strong and emphatic so they can stand alone in speech, we need to add the adjective δικός / -ή / -ό (dikós / -í / -ó) in front of them in the masculine, feminine, and neuter gender respectively. This depends on the gender of the person, animal, or thing that we’re talking about.

  • (δικός / -ή / -ό) μου (dikós / -í / -ó mu) — “my” (weak) / “mine” (strong)
  • (δικός / -ή / -ό) σου (dikós / -í / -ó su) — “your” (weak) / “yours”
  • (δικός / -ή / -ό) του (dikós / -í / -ó tu) — “his” (weak and strong)
  • (δικός / -ή / -ό) της (dikós / -í / -ó tis) — “her” (weak) / “hers” (strong)
  • (δικός / -ή / -ό) του (dikós / -í / -ó tu) — “its” (weak and strong)
  • (δικός / -ή / -ό) μας (dikós / -í / -ó mas) — “our” (weak) / “ours” (strong)
  • (δικός / -ή / -ό) σας (dikós / -í / -ó sas) — “your” (weak) / “yours” (strong)
  • (δικός / -ή / -ό) τους (dikós / -í / -ó tus) — “their” (weak) / “theirs” (strong)

Compare the following examples with the two previous ones to understand their exact use and differences.

Greek: Το φαγητό είναι δικό μου.

Romanization: To fayitó íne dikó mu.

Translation: “The food is mine.” (and no one else’s, emphatic)

Greek: Αυτό το σπίτι είναι δικό σας.

Romanization: Aftó to spíti íne dikó sas.

Translation: “This house is yours.” (it doesn’t belong to anyone else, emphatic)

It’s pretty clear, right? Mind, however, the following two examples:

Greek: Το δικό μου φαγητό είναι ανάλατο.

Romanization: To dikó mu fayitó íne análato.

Translation: “My food is unsalted.” (my food as opposed to someone else’s, emphatic)

Greek: Το δικό σας σπίτι είναι πολύ καθαρό.

Romanization: To dikó sas spíti íne polí katharó.

Translation: “Your house is very clean.” (your house as opposed to someone else’s, emphatic)

When the strong possessive pronoun goes before the noun, it’s translated using the weak English possessive pronoun.

2. Demonstrative Pronouns in Greek

A Finger Pointing at Something

Pointing at an object by extending your index is totally fine in Greece as a gesture. However, when it comes to pointing at people, it’s considered rude, and you should probably avoid this. If you’re into learning more about gestures in Greek culture, you can read our related article.

Here are some useful Greek demonstrative pronouns:

  • Greek: αυτός (masculine); αυτή (feminine); αυτό (neutral)
  • Romanization: aftós; aftí; aftó
  • Translation: “this”
  • Greek: αυτοί (masculine plural); αυτές (feminine plural); αυτά (neutral plural)
  • Romanization: aftí; aftés; aftá
  • Translation: “these”
  • Greek: εκείνος (masculine); εκείνη (feminine); εκείνο (neutral)
  • Romanization: ekínos; ekíni; ekíno
  • Translation: “that”
  • Greek: εκείνοι (masculine plural); εκείνες (feminine plural); εκείνα (neutral plural)
  • Romanization: ekíni; ekínes; ekína
  • Translation: “those”

Example:

Greek: Αυτός ο δάσκαλος φαίνεται πολύ αυστηρός, ενώ εκείνη η δασκάλα είναι πολύ γλυκιά.

Romanization: Aftós o dáskalos fénete polí afstirós, enó ekíni i daskála íne polí glikiá.

Translation: “This (male) teacher seems very strict, whereas that (female) teacher is very sweet.”

3. Interrogative Pronouns in Greek

Basic Questions

Almost every question includes an interrogative word. This statement alone highlights the importance of interrogative pronouns, not only in Greek, but in every language. The use of Greek interrogative pronouns is quite similar to the use of their English equivalents in terms of syntax and grammar.

Let’s begin with the basics.

  • Greek: Τι;
  • Romanization: Ti?
  • Translation: “What?”

Examples: 

Greek: Τι είναι αυτό εκεί;

Romanization: Ti íne aftó ekí?

Translation: “What is that over there?”

Greek: Τι συμβαίνει;

Romanization: Ti simvéni?

Translation: “What is going on?”

However, if you had to choose from a variety of objects, you would use “which,” right? Here is its Greek equivalent. 

  • Greek: Ποιο;
  • Romanization: Pio?
  • Translation: “Which?”

Example: 

Greek: Ποιο παντελόνι μου πηγαίνει καλύτερα;

Romanization: Pio pandelóni mu piyéni kalítera?

Translation: “Which trousers suit me better?”

A slight change is observed when asking “who.” In Greek, there are two forms, one for men and one for women. The one you use depends on the gender of the corresponding noun or name.

  • Greek: Ποιος (masculine) / Ποια (feminine);
  • Romanization: Pios / Pia?
  • Translation: “Who?”

Example: 

Greek: Ποιος μπορεί να με βοηθήσει;

Romanization: Pios borí na me voithísi?

Translation: “Who can help me?”

When asking a general question, the masculine form is preferred, as shown in the example above. In this case, the answer is either a woman or a man.

  • Greek: Ποιου/Ποιανού (masculine & neutral) / Ποιας/Ποιανής (feminine);
  • Romanization: Piu/Pianú / Pias/Pianís ?
  • Translation: “Whose…?”

So, this part might be a bit tricky. When referring to the interrogative pronoun “whose” in Greek, there are two types that can be used. The first one (ποιου, ποιας) is the more formal type, whereas the second one (ποιανού, ποιανής) is an informal type that’s mainly used in oral speech. Both types are correct and can be used interchangeably based on the occasion. Let’s have a look at some examples below.

Greek: Ποιου/Ποιανού είναι αυτό το παντελόνι;

Romanization: Piu/Pianú íne aftó to padelóni?

Translation: “Whose trousers are these?”

In questions like this one, we use the generic masculine type (ποιου, ποιανού), regardless of whether the answer refers to a male or a female. Therefore, “these trousers” could belong to either a man or a woman. 

Another important note on the above example, which isn’t related to pronouns, is that the word παντελόνι in Greek is singular, although in English it’s plural.

  • Greek: Ποιον (masculine) / Ποια (feminine);
  • Romanization: Pion / Pia ?
  • Translation: “Whom…?”

Greek: Σε ποιον θέλεις να αναθέσεις αυτήν την εργασία;

Romanization: Se pion thélis na anathésis aftín tin ergasía?

Translation: “To whom would you like to assign this?”

Again, in this case, the masculine form is used as a generic form.

4. Indefinite Pronouns in Greek

Two Girls Holding a Notebook

Now, here’s a quick list of Greek indefinite pronouns you can use when you don’t need to be very specific. 

  • Greek: κάποιος
  • Romanization: kápios
  • Translation: “someone” (masculine)
  • Greek: κάποια
  • Romanization: kápia
  • Translation: “someone” (feminine)
  • Greek: κάποιο
  • Romanization: kápio
  • Translation: “someone” / “something” (neutral)
  • Greek: κάτι
  • Romanization: káti
  • Translation: “something”

Example: 

Greek: Κάποιος πρέπει να κάνει κάτι.

Romanization: Kápios prépi na káni káti.

Translation: “Someone has to do something.”

  • Greek: κανείς / κανένας
  • Romanization: kanís / kanénas
  • Translation: “no one” / “nobody” (masculine)
  • Greek: καμιά / καμία
  • Romanization: kamiá / kamía
  • Translation: “nobody” (feminine)
  • Greek: κανένα
  • Romanization: kanéna
  • Translation: “nobody” (neutral)

Example:

Greek: Κανένας άνδρας, καμία γυναίκα και κανένα παιδί δεν πρέπει να πεινούν.

Romanization: Kanénas ándras, kamía yinéka ke kanéna pedí den prépi na pinún.

Translation: “No man, no woman, and no child should be left starving.”

  • Greek: τίποτα
  • Romanization: típota
  • Translation: “nothing,” “anything,” “something,” “any”

Example:

Greek: Δεν θέλει τίποτα.

Romanization: Den théli típota.

Translation: “He doesn’t want anything.”

5. Relative Pronouns in Greek

Again, in the case of Greek relative pronouns, there’s a distinction when it comes to different genders. 

  • Greek: ο οποίος
  • Romanization: o opíos
  • Translation: “who” (masculine)

Example: 

Greek: Αυτός είναι ο άνδρας ο οποίος με βοήθησε να κουβαλήσω τη βαλίτσα μου.

Romanization: Aftós íne o ándras o opíos me voíthise na kuvalíso ti valítsa mu.

Translation: “This is the man who helped me carry my suitcase.”

  • Greek: η οποία
  • Romanization: i opía
  • Translation: “who” (feminine)

Example: 

Greek: Η Μαρία είναι κοπέλα η οποία δουλεύει στο ξενοδοχείο.

Romanization: I María íne i kopéla i opía dulévi sto xenodohío.

Translation: “Maria is the girl who works at the hotel.”

  • Greek: το οποίο
  • Romanization: to opío
  • Translation: “whο” (neutral) / “which”

Examples:

Greek: Αυτό είναι το παιδί το οποίο γλίστρησε και χτύπησε στην παιδική χαρά.

Romanization: Aftó íne to pedí, to opío glístrise ke htípise stin pedikí hará.

Translation: “This is the child who slipped and fell over at the playground.”

Greek: Αυτό είναι το σπίτι το οποίο είχαμε νοικιάσει πέρυσι.

Romanization: Aftó íne to spíti, to opío íhame nikiási périsi.

Translation: “This is the house which we rented last year.”

Feeling a bit confused? 

Not sure which type you should use in each case?

We’ve got the solution for you: The magic word is που (pu), which means “that,” and is often used to substitute ο οποίος / η οποία / το οποίο, offering the advantage that it doesn’t change according to the gender of the noun.

  • Greek: που
  • Romanization: pu
  • Translation: “that” (for all genders)

Now, let’s adjust the above examples by using the word που. 

Greek: Αυτός είναι ο άνδρας που με βοήθησε να κουβαλήσω τη βαλίτσα μου.

Romanization: Aftós íne o ándras pu me voíthise na kuvalíso ti valítsa mu.

Translation: “This is the man that helped me carry my suitcase.”

Greek: Η Μαρία είναι κοπέλα που δουλεύει στο ξενοδοχείο.

Romanization: I María íne i kopéla pu dulévi sto xenodohío.

Translation: “Maria is the girl that works at the hotel.”

Greek: Αυτό είναι το παιδί που γλίστρησε και χτύπησε στην παιδική χαρά.

Romanization: Aftó íne to pedí pu glístrise ke htípise stin pedikí hará.

Translation: “This is the child that slipped and fell over at the playground.”

Greek: Αυτό είναι το σπίτι που είχαμε νοικιάσει πέρυσι.

Romanization: Aftó íne to spíti pu íhame nikiási périsi.

Translation: “This is the house that we rented last year.”

And here are some more Greek relative pronouns: 

  • Greek: οποιοσδήποτε
  • Romanization: opiosdípote
  • Translation: “anyone” (masculine)
  • Greek: οποιαδήποτε
  • Romanization: opiadípote
  • Translation: “anyone” (feminine)
  • Greek: οποιοδήποτε
  • Romanization: opiodípote
  • Translation: “anyone” (neutral)
  • Greek: οτιδήποτε
  • Romanization: otidípote
  • Translation: “anything”

6. Conclusion

Improve Listening

Greek pronouns are part of the core of the language. By learning them, you’ll definitely find it easier to express yourself in Greek and you’ll be able to construct meaningful sentences in no time. 

So, what else will you probably need in order to enhance your vocabulary? Nouns and adjectives, of course. We’ve got you covered on this, as well. Just take a look at our Greek Nouns and Greek Adjectives articles and learn everything you need to know.

Did our Greek language pronouns guide help you out? Is there a pronoun that troubles you, or one we forgot?

Let us know in the comments section below!

At GreekPod101.com, we aim to provide you with everything you need to know about the Greek language in a fun and interesting way. Articles like this one, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos are waiting for you to discover them! And if you prefer a one-on-one learning experience, you can use our MyTeacher Messenger before heading over to our online community to discuss lessons with other students.

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Greek Word Order: The Basic Sentence Structure

Thumbnail

If you’ve been following us, it’s for sure that you’ve learned a bunch of Greek words and phrases. 

Well done!

However, random words and phrases can’t mean anything unless they’re placed in the correct order. This is why we’ve created a dedicated blog post showcasing the correct Greek word order.

While ancient Greek word order was a bit more complicated, things in modern Greek are much simpler. 

After reading this article, you’ll be able to construct full sentences in Greek like a native speaker.

Now, let’s have a look at some basic rules and comprehensive examples.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Overview of Word Order in Greek
  2. Basic Word Order with Subject, Verb, and Object (or Predicate)
  3. Word Order with Adverbial Phrases
  4. Word Order with Modifiers
  5. How to Change a Sentence into a Yes-or-No Question
  6. How to Form Long Sentences Step-by-Step
  7. Conclusion

1. Overview of Word Order in Greek

Handwritten Words on Paper

The basic word order in Greek sentences follows the SVO pattern. However, the sentence structure is flexible, and many other variations exist.

Overall, the sentence structure is the same as that in the English language. A major difference is that the subject can sometimes be omitted in Greek, as the form of the verb itself indicates the first, second, or third person so that the subject is often understood from the context. This is due to the conjugation of Greek verbs, according to which, the suffix of the verb changes based upon the person and the number of the subject.

2. Basic Word Order with Subject, Verb, and Object (or Predicate)

In this section, we’ll focus on the basic word order in modern Greek and its variations.

2.1 The Basic Word Order 

Greek: Εγώ μελετώ ελληνικά.

Romanization: Egó meletó eliniká.

Translation: “I study Greek.”

Subject: Εγώ (Egó) | Verb: μελετώ (meletó) | Object: ελληνικά (eliniká)

Greek: Η Μαρία οδηγεί ένα αυτοκίνητο.

Romanization: I María odiyí éna aftokínito.

Translation: “Maria drives a car.”

Subject: Η Μαρία (I María) | Verb: οδηγεί (odiyí) | Object: ένα αυτοκίνητο (éna aftokínito)

Greek: Ο πατέρας μου είναι δάσκαλος.

Romanization: O patéras mu íne dáskalos.

Translation: “My father is a teacher.”

Subject: Ο πατέρας μου (O patéras mu) | Verb: είναι (íne) | Predicate: δάσκαλος (dáskalos)

Greek: Το ξενοδοχείο είναι μεγάλο.

Romanization: To xenodohío íne megálo.

Translation: “The hotel is big.”

Subject: Το ξενοδοχείο (To xenodohío) | Verb: είναι (íne) | Predicate: μεγάλο (megálo)

2.2 Word Order with Emphasis on the Object

Now, let’s take a look at what happens when we need to emphasize the object.

An Individual Writing in a Notebook

When we want to emphasize the object, we place the object at the beginning of the sentence, followed by the verb and the subject. This can also be perceived as a reversal of the basic sentence components, which in this case follow the OVS pattern, as shown in the examples below.

Greek: Ελληνικά μελετώ εγώ.

Romanization: Eliniká meletó egó.

Translation: “Greek (is what) I study.”

Subject: εγώ (egó) | Verb: μελετώ (meletó) | Object: Ελληνικά (Eliniká)

Greek: Ένα αυτοκίνητο οδηγεί η Μαρία.

Romanization: Éna aftokínito odiyí i María.

Translation: “(It is) a car (that) Maria drives.”*

Subject: η Μαρία (i María) | Verb: οδηγεί (odiyí) | Object: Ένα αυτοκίνητο (Éna aftokínito)

* This would be the answer to the question: Τι οδηγεί η Μαρία; (Ti odiyí i María?), or “What is Maria driving?” It indicates that she’s driving a car as opposed to a bus, for example.

Greek: Δάσκαλος είναι ο πατέρας μου.

Romanization: Dáskalos íne o patéras mu.

Translation: “(A) teacher is (what) my father (is).”

Subject: ο πατέρας μου (o patéras mu) | Verb: είναι (íne) | Predicate: Δάσκαλος (Dáskalos)

Greek: Μεγάλο είναι το ξενοδοχείο.

Romanization: Megálo íne to xenodohío.

Translation: “Big is (what) the hotel (is).”

Subject: το ξενοδοχείο (to xenodohío) | Verb: είναι (íne) | Predicate: Μεγάλο (Megálo)

3. Word Order with Adverbial Phrases

Improve Pronunciation

When it comes to adverbial phrases, Greek word order is almost identical to English. Adverbial phrases indicate information about the verb, such as “when,” “where,” or “how” something happened. These are normally placed at the end of the sentence. They can be single words (e.g. an adverb) or whole phrases (e.g. a prepositional phrase). If you want to learn more about Greek adverbs, visit our Top 100 Greek Adverbs article.

Greek: Εγώ μελετώ ελληνικά κάθε μέρα.

Romanization: Egó meletó eliniká káthe méra.

Translation: “I study Greek everyday.”

Subject: Εγώ (Egó) | Verb: μελετώ (meletó) | Object: ελληνικά (eliniká) | Adverbial phrase answering “When?”: κάθε μέρα (káthe méra)

Greek: Εγώ μελετώ ελληνικά στο σπίτι.

Romanization: Egó meletó eliniká sto spíti.

Translation: “I study Greek at home.”

Subject: Εγώ (Egó) | Verb: μελετώ (meletó) | Object: ελληνικά (eliniká) | Adverbial phrase answering “Where?”: στο σπίτι (sto spíti)

Greek: Εγώ μελετώ ελληνικά με το GreekPod101.com.

Romanization: Egó meletó eliniká me to GreekPod101.com.

Translation: “I study Greek with GreekPod101.com.”

Subject: Εγώ (Egó) | Verb: μελετώ (meletó) | Object: ελληνικά (eliniká) | Adverbial phrase answering “How?”: με το GreekPod101.com (to GreekPod101.com)

When more than one adverbial phrase needs to be included, their order is flexible. Let’s have a

look at some examples below:

Greek: Εγώ μελετώ ελληνικά κάθε μέρα στο σπίτι με το GreekPod101.com.

Romanization: Egó meletó eliniká káthe méra sto spíti me to GreekPod101.com.

Translation: “I study Greek everyday at home with GreekPod101.com.”

Subject: Εγώ (Egó) | Verb: μελετώ (meletó) | Object: ελληνικά (eliniká) | Adverbial Phrase 1: κάθε μέρα (káthe méra) [indicating time] | Adverbial Phrase 2: στο σπίτι (sto spíti me) [indicating place] | Adverbial Phrase 3: με το GreekPod101.com (to GreekPod101.com) [indicating manner]

However, it would be equally correct to use any of the following variations, with no change in the

meaning or usage.

Greek: Εγώ μελετώ ελληνικά στο σπίτι κάθε μέρα με το GreekPod101.com.

Romanization: Egó meletó eliniká sto spíti káthe méra me to GreekPod101.com.

Translation: “I study Greek at home everyday with GreekPod101.com.”

Greek: Εγώ μελετώ ελληνικά στο σπίτι με το GreekPod101.com κάθε μέρα.

Romanization: Egó meletó eliniká sto spíti me to GreekPod101.com káthe méra.

Translation: “I study Greek at home with GreekPod101.com everyday.”

Greek: Εγώ μελετώ ελληνικά με το GreekPod101.com στο σπίτι κάθε μέρα .

Romanization: Egó meletó eliniká me to GreekPod101.com sto spíti káthe méra.

Translation: “I study Greek with GreekPod101.com at home everyday.”

4. Word Order with Modifiers

A Woman Thinking of Various Phrases

4.1 Word Order with Adjectives

In Greek language word order, adjectives are usually placed before the noun they modify. In addition, they must follow the gender, case, and the number of the noun. The same rule applies to numerals. 

Greek: Εγώ γράφω με μπλε στιλό.

Romanization: Egó gráfo me ble stiló.

Translation: “I write with a blue pen.”

Learn the Top 100 Most Common Greek Adjectives in our relevant article!

4.2 Word Order with Adverbs

Adverbs are generally placed after the verb they modify, or at the end of the sentence.

Greek: Εγώ γράφω πιο καθαρά με μπλε στιλό.

Romanization: Egó gráfo pio kathará me ble stiló.

Translation: “I write more clearly with a blue pen.”

Greek: Εγώ γράφω με μπλε στιλό πιο καθαρά.

Romanization: Egó gráfo me ble stiló pio kathará.

Translation: “I write with a blue pen more clearly.”

Do you want to learn the most common Greek adverbs? Check out our Top 100 Greek Adverbs article!

4.3 Word Order with Relative Clauses

Relative clauses are placed within a sentence, after the word they refer to, like in English.

Greek: Ο καφές που παρήγγειλα ήταν κρύος.

Romanization: O kafés pu paríngila ítan kríos.

Translation: “The coffee that I ordered was cold.”

4.4 Word Order with Possessive Pronouns

Possessive pronouns are placed after the noun they refer to, as opposed to in English where they’re placed before the noun.

Greek: Ο καφές μου ήταν κρύος.

Romanization: O kafés mu ítan kríos.

Translation: “My coffee was cold.”

Practice makes perfect! Study the Top 100 Greek Pronouns in our article!

5. How to Change a Sentence into a Yes-or-No Question

A Sketch of a Man’s Head Filled with Questions in Post-it Papers

Changing a sentence into a yes-or-no question is really easy in Greek. Usually, just adding a

question mark at the end will do the job, as demonstrated in the examples below:

Original Affirmative Sentence

Greek: Εγώ μελετώ ελληνικά κάθε μέρα.

Romanization: Egó meletó eliniká káthe méra.

Translation: “I study Greek everyday.”

Conversion into a Yes-or-No Question:

Greek: Εγώ μελετώ ελληνικά κάθε μέρα;

Romanization: Egó meletó eliniká káthe méra?

Translation: “Do I study Greek everyday?”

As you can see, there’s no change in the sentence structure other than the addition of a question mark

at the end, which in Greek looks like an English semicolon.

6. How to Form Long Sentences Step-by-Step

An Open Book with Glasses on the Top

The key to constructing longer and more complex sentences in Greek is to take into account everything we’ve covered so far. Here’s an example of how to construct a longer sentence in Greek, step-by-step:

Step 1: Just choose a simple SVO sentence first.

Greek: Εσύ ήπιες νερό.

Romanization: Esí ípies neró.

Translation: “You drank water.”

Note: The verb should comply with the person and number of the subject and be formed in the correct tense and mood, since Greek verbs conjugate.

Step 2: Add an adverbial phrase.

Greek: Εσύ ήπιες νερό πριν από δέκα λεπτά.

Romanization: Esí ípies neró prin apó déka leptá.

Translation: “You drank water ten minutes ago.”

Note: The adverbial phrase is placed at the end of the sentence.

Step 3: Add modifiers in the sentence.

Greek: Εσύ ήπιες δύο μικρά μπουκάλια νερό πριν από δέκα λεπτά.

Romanization: Esí ípies dío mikrá bukália neró prin apó déka leptá.

Translation: “You drank two small bottles of water ten minutes ago.”

Note: Take into account that the numeral is placed before the noun and before the adjective (if the noun has one), just like in English.

Step 4: Conversion to a Question

Greek: Εσύ ήπιες δύο μικρά μπουκάλια νερό πριν από δέκα λεπτά;

Romanization: Esí ípies dío mikrá bukália neró prin apó déka leptá?

Translation: “Did you drink two small bottles of water ten minutes ago?”

7. Conclusion

Improve Listening

Unlike the vast Greek grammar, which consists of many rules and exceptions, Greek syntax is way easier to learn. 

As you might have noticed, there are only a few things you should keep in mind when it comes to modern Greek word order. 

Start learning Greek today in a consistent and organized manner by creating a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com. Tons of free vocabulary lists, YouTube videos, and grammar tips are waiting for you to discover. 
In the meantime, is there a sentence structure that troubles you? Check out our Must-Know Greek Sentence Structures series. If you have any questions, let us know in the comments and we’d be happy to help!

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Compliments in Greek: Ultimate Guide to Greek Compliments

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Who doesn’t enjoy a heartfelt compliment?

I don’t know about you, but Greeks do enjoy compliments very much!

Giving and receiving compliments is what brings people closer.

Whether between friends, colleagues, or even lovers, complimenting is an integral part of everyday life.

In this article, we’ve gathered the best Greek compliments, along with what they mean and how to use them! By the time you finish reading, you’ll be able to share everything you’ve always wanted with the people you appreciate. We’ll explore how to compliment someone’s looks, work, and skills, with relevant examples.

So, are you ready to begin complimenting in Greek? Then continue reading.

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Table of Contents

  1. An Introduction to Greek Compliments
  2. Complimenting Someone’s Look
  3. Complimenting Someone’s Work
  4. Complimenting Someone’s Skills
  5. How to Make Your Compliments Sound More Sincere
  6. What to Expect After Giving Compliments
  7. Conclusion

1. An Introduction to Greek Compliments

Compliments

First things first, let’s have a look at how to say the word “compliment” as a noun in Greek.

  • Greek: (το) κομπλιμέντο
  • Romanization: kompliméndo
  • Translation: “compliment”

Did you notice anything interesting?

I’m sure you did:

The Greek word κομπλιμέντο (or κοπλιμέντο) is very similar to its English equivalent. The explanation is really simple: both words are borrowed from Italian. At this point, we should note that this term is widely used in everyday conversations.

However, there’s another Greek word for “compliment,” demonstrated below.

  • Greek: (η) φιλοφρόνηση
  • Romanization: filofrónisi
  • Translation: “compliment”

This term is an original Greek compound word. More specifically, it consists of the words φίλος (fílos), meaning “friend” + φρονώ (fronó), meaning “to think” or “to consider.” It’s a very scholarly word, so it’s not widely used in everyday conversations; however, you might encounter it in Greek books and literature.

Now let’s take a look at how to say “giving a compliment” in Greek.

  • Greek: Κάνω ένα κομπλιμέντο.
  • Romanization: Káno éna kompliméndo.
  • Literal Translation: “I do a compliment.”
  • Meaning: “I give a compliment.” / “I compliment.”

Whereas in English, we can simply use “compliment” as a verb, there’s no equivalent verb in Greek. So the same meaning can be expressed by using the phrase κάνω ένα κομπλιμέντο (káno éna kompliméndo), which literally means “I do a compliment.” Please note the difference, since in English, the verb “to give” is used in this case (instead of “to do”), which might confuse novice Greek learners.

2. Complimenting Someone’s Look

A Man Complimenting a Woman through a Window
Image Description:

Complimenting someone on their looks can really cheer them up!

In Greek, however, it’s more common to compliment someone’s look when flirting, rather than between friends. Nevertheless, this is definitely not a constraint, as many close friends also compliment each other.

You can find the most common Greek phrases for complimenting someone’s look below.

  • Greek: Τα μαλλιά σου είναι πολύ ωραία σήμερα.
  • Romanization: Ta maliá su íne polí oréa símera.
  • Translation: “Your hair is very nice today.”
  • Example Situation: When you want to compliment someone (male or female) on their hair.
  • Greek: Μου αρέσει η μπλούζα σου.
  • Romanization: Mu arési i blúza su.
  • Translation: “I like your blouse/shirt.”
  • Example Situation: When you want to compliment someone (male or female) on their blouse/shirt.
  • Greek: Έχεις όμορφο χαμόγελο.
  • Romanization: Éhis ómorfo hamóyelo.
  • Translation: “You’ve got a pretty smile.”
  • Example Situation: When you want to compliment someone (male or female) on their smile.
  • Greek: Είσαι πολύ γλυκός!
  • Romanization: Íse polí glikós.
  • Translation: “You are very sweet!”
  • Example Situation: When you want to compliment someone (male) on his personality.
  • Greek: Είσαι η πιο όμορφη γυναίκα που έχω γνωρίσει.
  • Romanization: Íse i pio ómorfi yinéka pu ého gnorísi.
  • Translation: “You are the most beautiful woman I have ever met.”
  • Example Situation: When you want to compliment someone (female) on her beauty.

Please note that giving such personal compliments to someone of the opposite sex might be perceived as flirting, so use them wisely. Within the same context, Greek men tend to give many compliments…even to random women in the streets. There’s nothing to be afraid of, though. Just smile and say thank you.

If you want to learn more about Greek flirting, take a look at our list of the Top 15 Love Phrases.

3. Complimenting Someone’s Work

People Looking at a Sheet of Statistics

Another context where complimenting is really important is in our work environment. After all, we tend to spend a third of our life in our workspace. So, giving and receiving work-related compliments is crucial for bonding with colleagues, as well as for making progress.

Here are the most common Greek compliments that can be used in a work environment:

  • Greek: Μπράβο!
  • Romanization: Brávo!
  • Translation: “Bravo!”
  • Example Situation: When you want to praise someone.
  • Greek: Συγχαρητήρια!
  • Romanization: Siharitíria!
  • Translation: “Congratulations!”
  • Example Situation: When you want to congratulate someone.
  • Greek: Έχεις κάνει πολύ καλή δουλειά.
  • Romanization: Éhis káni polí kalí duliá.
  • Translation: “You’ve done a very good job.”
  • Example Situation: When you want to praise someone for their work.
  • Greek: Είσαι πολύ εργατικός / εργατική!
  • Romanization: Íse polí ergatikós / ergatikí!
  • Translation: “You are very hardworking!”
  • Example Situation: When you want to praise someone for their hard work.
  • Greek: Η παρουσίασή σου ήταν πολύ καλή.
  • Romanization: I parusíasi su ítan polí kalí.
  • Translation: “Your presentation was very good.”
  • Example Situation: When you want to praise someone who has just finished their presentation.
  • Greek: Η ιδέα σου ήταν εξαιρετική.
  • Romanization: Ι idéa su ítan exeretikí.
  • Translation: “Your idea was excellent.”
  • Example Situation: When you want to praise someone for their idea.

4. Complimenting Someone’s Skills

A Chef Cutting Some Vegetables

Excellent skills are hard to find. Therefore, we should recognize them and praise those who have them accordingly. This acknowledgement is what keeps people going and becoming better and better.

Below are some of the most common Greek compliments on someone’s skills.

  • Greek: Έχεις πολύ ταλέντο!
  • Romanization: Éhis polí talédo!
  • Translation: “You are very talented!”
  • Example Situation: When you want to praise someone (male or female) for their skills.
  • Greek: Είσαι εξαιρετικός μάγειρας!
  • Romanization: Íse exeretikós máyiras!
  • Translation: “You are an exceptional cook!”
  • Example Situation: When you want to praise someone (male) for his cooking skills.
  • Greek: Είσαι εξαιρετική μαγείρισσα!
  • Romanization: Íse exeretikí mayírisa!
  • Translation: “You are an exceptional cook!”
  • Example Situation: When you want to praise someone (female) for her cooking skills.
  • Greek: Βγάζεις πολύ ωραίες φωτογραφίες!
  • Romanization: Vgázis polí orées fotografíes!
  • Translation: “You take very nice shots!”
  • Example Situation: When you want to praise someone (male or female) for their photos.
  • Note: In Greek, the expression is βγάζω φωτογραφία, which is literally translated as “take out photos.”
  • Greek: Μιλάς πολύ καλά ελληνικά.
  • Romanization: Milás polí kalá eliniká.
  • Translation: “You speak very good Greek.”
  • Example Situation: When you want to praise someone (male or female) for their language skills.
  • Greek: Είσαι σίγουρος/-η ότι δεν είσαι επαγγελματίας;
  • Romanization: Íse síguros/-i óti den íse epaggelmatías?
  • Translation: “Are you sure you’re not a professional?”
  • Example Situation: When you want to praise someone (male or female) for their skills in a specific sector.

5. How to Make Your Compliments Sound More Sincere

A Smiling Woman Working at a bakery

Although compliments should always be honest, there are a few things you can do to seem more sincere. In Greece, there isn’t anything specific you should do while giving compliments, but here are a few useful tips:

  • A shining smile is always a good way to show that you really mean the compliment. Just wear your best smile and say something honest and nice.
  • Looking the other party in the eye is another way to express your honesty. In Greece, it’s considered to be the best way to detect if someone is lying.
  • Feel free to clap if you’re excited. While this isn’t appropriate for more personal comments, it’s perfectly fine when giving compliments about someone’s skills or work-related achievements.

6. What to Expect After Giving Compliments

A Woman with a Bright Smile

When receiving a compliment, most people kindly smile and say thank you.

Here are some relevant phrases you can use when receiving compliments in Greek.

  • Greek: Ευχαριστώ πολύ!
  • Romanization: Efharistó polí!
  • Translation: “Thank you very much!”
  • Greek: Ευχαριστώ πολύ για το κομπλιμέντο!
  • Romanization: Efharistó polí ya to kompliméndo!
  • Translation: “Thank you very much for the compliment!”
  • Greek: Υπερβάλλεις!
  • Romanization: Ipervális!
  • Translation: “You are exaggerating!”

Positive Feelings

7. Conclusion

Giving a compliment is always a nice gesture; it makes people happy and brightens their day. In Greek, there are no special phrases, and at this point we could say that complimenting in Greek is very similar to complimenting in English. Indeed, even in the context of gestures, no significant differences have been found.

Put on your best smile and make others happy!

Just a short note to self: Compliment others more—even in Greek!

Is there another compliment in Greek you want to learn? Let us know in the comments!

At GreekPod101.com, we aim to provide you with everything you need to know about the Greek language in a fun and interesting way. Articles, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos, are waiting for you to discover them! And if you prefer a one-on-one learning experience, you can use our MyTeacher Messenger before heading over to our online community to discuss lessons with other students.

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Celebrating the Greek Orthodox Saturday of Souls in Greece

While Greece is a country of many religions, over ninety percent of the Greek population identifies as Eastern Orthodox Christian. This makes all related holidays a huge deal here, and today we’re going to tell you about what you can expect on a Greek Orthodox Saturday of Souls.

You’ll learn about the basics of Soul Saturday, Orthodox traditions that usually take place, and lots of useful vocabulary words.

Let’s get started.

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1. What is the Greek Saturday of Souls?

Within the Greek Orthodox Church, there’s a tradition of praying for the νεκρός (nekrós), or “dead,” every Saturday. This is done in memoriam of when Jesus died on the Great and Holy Saturday.

However, there are also two specific days set aside each year, which are often called Soul Saturday or Saturday of the Souls. On each Soul Saturday, Greek Orthodox Christians Τιμώ τους νεκρούς (Timó tus nekrús), or “honor the deceased,” and pray for their forgiveness. This is done specifically for those who have died but—for whatever reason—never had a proper memorial service.

Even before Christianity entered Greece, it was very common for the Greek people to hold memorials for their dead, in which they offered sacrifices and prayed in order to ensure the deceased’s forgiveness.

    → Check out our Religion vocabulary list for some useful words!

2. When are the Soul Saturday Dates?

A Wheat Field

The dates of Soul Saturday vary each year, based on the Eastern Orthodox religious calendar.

There are two main Soul Saturdays. The first one is on the Σάββατο πριν την Κυριακή της Απόκρεω (Sávato prin tin Kiriakí tis Apókreo), or “Saturday before Meatfare Sunday.” The second one is on the Σάββατο πριν την Κυριακή της Πεντηκοστής (Sávato prin tin Kiriakí tis Pendikostís), or “Saturday before Pentecost Sunday.”

For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s dates for the next ten years.

Year First Soul Saturday
(Saturday of Souls Before
Meatfare Sunday)
Second Soul Saturday
(Saturday of Souls Before
Pentecost)
2020 February 22 June 6
2021 March 6 June 19
2022 February 26 June 11
2023 February 18 June 3
2024 March 9 June 22
2025 February 22 June 7
2026 February 14 May 30
2027 March 6 June 19
2028 February 19 June 3
2029 February 10 May 26

3. How Do the Greeks Celebrate Soul Saturday?

A Woman Visiting a Cemetery

The most common Saturday of Souls traditions include μνημόσυνο (mnimósino), or “memorial services,” and an accompanying τρισάγιο (trisáyio), or “special memorial prayer.” As we mentioned earlier, this is a time to pray for the deceased’s forgiveness so that they can αναπαύομαι εν ειρήνη (anapávome en iríni), or “rest in peace.” For a typical memorial service, the event will first be publicized via printed announcements; during the actual service, the Divine Liturgy will be given, followed by the memorial prayer.

In Greece, Saturday of Souls is also an opportunity for people to visit the μνήμα (mníma), or “tomb,” of a loved one. Here, they show respect to the deceased by cleaning the tombstone, taking care of the land around it, leaving flowers, burning incense, and lighting the καντήλι (kandíli), or “vigil oil lamp.”

Another popular tradition is that of eating koliva. This is a delicious dessert that consists of boiled σιτάρι (sitári), or “wheat,” raisins, cinnamon, nuts, pomegranate, and powdered sugar. This dish is handed out after a memorial service, and if there are any leftovers, they’re given to friends and family; this allows the dead to be symbolically forgiven. This custom is thought to have originated in Ancient Greece, because the Ancient Greeks used to offer the dead a similar dish of wheat and nuts.

Crete has a custom for Soul Saturday (and the day preceding it), in which people don’t cut down trees. This is because they believe there are souls sitting on the branches, and cutting the trees down would disturb them.

4. Koliva from Strangers

There’s a Greek proverb, which means in English: “He is having a memorial with koliva from strangers.” What does that mean?

Usually, when someone says this, they’re referring to the fact that someone is pretending to be generous when they’re actually giving away someone else’s money or resources!

5. Must-Know Soul Saturday Vocabulary

A Lit Vigil Oil Lamp

Let’s review some of the vocabulary words from this article!

  • Σιτάρι (Sitári) — “Wheat” [n. neut]
  • Ψυχοσάββατο (Psihosávato) — “Soul Saturday” [neut]
  • Σάββατο πριν την Κυριακή της Απόκρεω (Sávato prin tin Kiriakí tis Apókreo) — “Saturday before Meatfare Sunday”
  • Σάββατο πριν την Κυριακή της Πεντηκοστής (Sávato prin tin Kiriakí tis Pendikostís) — “Saturday before Pentecost Sunday”
  • Νεκρός (Nekrós) — “Dead” [n. masc]
  • Αναπαύομαι εν ειρήνη (Anapávome en iríni) — “Rest in peace”
  • Μνημόσυνο (Mnimósino) — “Memorial services” [n. neut]
  • Μνήμα (Mníma) — “Tomb” [n. neut]
  • Καντήλι (Kandíli) — “Vigil oil lamp” [n. neut]
  • Αγγελτήριο (Angeltírio) — “Printed announcement” [n. neut]
  • Τρισάγιο (Trisáyio) — “Special memorial prayer” [n. neut]
  • Θεία Λειτουργία (Thía Lituryía) — “Divine Liturgy” [fem]
  • Κόλλυβα (Kóliva) — “Koliva” [n. neut]
  • Ζάχαρη άχνη (Záhari áhni) — “Powdered sugar” [fem]
  • Λιβανίζω (Livanízo) — “cense” [v.]
  • Τιμώ τους νεκρούς (Timó tus nekrús) — “Honor the deceased”

If you want to hear the pronunciation of each word and phrase listed above, be sure to visit our Greek Soul Saturday vocabulary list!

Final Thoughts

We hope you enjoyed learning about the Saturday of Souls, Greek Orthodox Church traditions and customs for it, and some vocab you can start using today!

Does your country have a Soul Saturday holiday, or another holiday for commemorating the deceased? Please tell us about it in the comments; we love hearing from you!

To continue learning about Greek culture and the language, GreekPod101.com has several free resources for you, straight from our blog:

This only scratches the surface of everything GreekPod101.com has to offer the aspiring Greek-learner. To make the most of your study-time, create your free lifetime account today; for access to exclusive content and lessons, upgrade to our Premium or Premium PLUS plans.

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Your Guide to Gender in Greek Grammar

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In the Greek language, there are three genders: masculine, feminine, and neuter. Each noun in Greek has a specific gender and—unlike in English—these genders don’t only apply exclusively to nouns referring to people, but also to nouns that refer to things or animals. Therefore, gender should be viewed as a grammatical attribute of a noun and not necessarily as the sex of a person, animal, or thing.

The gender roles in Greek society are deeply influenced by the patriarchal family model, although it has been modernized over the past few decades, attempting to ensure that women are equal to men. If you take a look at Greek mythology, the gods normally represent physical power, whereas goddesses represent wisdom, love, and organization. However, today’s Greek society is quite balanced when it comes to the differences between the two genders.

In this article, we’ve gathered all the tips and tricks to help you understand grammatical Greek genders.

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Table of Contents

  1. The Word “Gender” in Greek
  2. Articles in Greek According to Their Gender
  3. Guessing the Gender of a Word in Greek
  4. Memorizing the Gender of a Noun in Greek
  5. Gender Variations for Adjectives
  6. Conclusion

1. The Word “Gender” in Greek

Male and Female Signs Painted on a Blackboard with Chalk

  • Greek: γένος
  • Romanization: yénos
  • Translation: “gender”

The word above is utilized in grammar to express the gender of a noun or an adjective.

  • Greek: φύλο
  • Romanization: fílo
  • Translation: “gender”

This one is utilized in everyday speech to express the gender/sex of a person.

In Greek grammar, we use the word γένος, therefore there are three genders, which are: αρσενικό (arsenikó) meaning “masculine,” θηλυκό (thilikó) meaning “feminine,” and ουδέτερο (udétero) meaning “neuter.” These genders characterize nouns, adjectives, articles, and some pronouns and participles.

2. Articles in Greek According to Their Gender

A Female and Male Sign on a Transparent Door

The definitive articles in Greek are: ο (masculine), η (feminine), and το (neuter). They change depending on the grammatical case, though they all translate to the English word “the.”

Masculine Definitive Article:
Nominative: ο
Genitive: του
Accusative: τον

Feminine Definitive Article:
Nominative: η
Genitive: της
Accusative: τη(ν)

Neuter Definitive Article:
Nominative: το
Genitive: του
Accusative: το

Here’s an example of how these definite articles can be used in everyday conversations.

  • Greek: Στο εστιατόριο ο άντρας κοιτούσε τον κατάλογο, η γυναίκα κοιτούσε το κινητό και το παιδί έπαιζε με τα παιχνίδια του.
  • Romanization: Sto estiatório o ándras kitúse ton katálogo, i yinéka kitúse to kinitó ke to pedí épeze me ta pehnídia tu.
  • Translation: “In the restaurant, the man was looking at the menu, the woman was looking at the phone, and the child was playing with his toys.”

The indefinite articles in Greek are: ένας (masculine), μια/μία (feminine), and ένα (neuter). They also get inflected according to the case.

Masculine Indefinite Article:
Nominative: ένας
Genitive: ενός
Accusative: έναν

Feminine Indefinite Article:
Nominative: μια
Genitive: μιας
Accusative: μια

Neuter Indefinite Article:
Nominative: ένα
Genitive: ενός
Accusative: ένα

Here’s an example of how to use indefinite articles.

  • Greek: Ένας άντρας, μια γυναίκα και ένα παιδί έκατσαν στο δίπλα τραπέζι.
  • Romanization: Énas ándras, mia yinéka ke éna pedí ékatsan sto dípla trapézi.
  • Translation: “A man, a woman, and a child sat on the nearby table.”

3. Guessing the Gender of a Word in Greek

Male and Female Underpants

Recognizing the gender of a noun in Greek can be tricky, since all of these get inflected, resulting in different endings depending on the case they’re used in. However, in this section, we’ll refer to the most popular masculine, feminine, and neuter noun endings in the nominative case (i.e. the dictionary form).

Masculine endings:

-ος      Examples: ο άνθρωπος (o ánthropos) meaning “the human”; ο καιρός (o kerós) meaning “the weather”; ο ήλιος (o ílios) meaning “the sun”; ο κόσμος (o kózmos) meaning “the world.”

-ας      Examples: ο μπαμπάς (o babás) meaning “the father”; ο άντρας (o ándras) meaning “the man”; ο κανόνας (o kanónas) meaning “the rule”; ο ελέφαντας (o eléfandas) meaning “the elephant.”

-ης      Examples: ο λογιστής (o loyistís) meaning “the accountant”; ο υπολογιστής (o ipoloyistís) meaning “the computer”; ο πελάτης (o pelátis) meaning “the customer”; ο μαθητής (o mathitís) meaning “the student.”

-ες      Examples: ο καφές (o kafés) meaning “the coffee”; ο λεκές (o lekés) meaning “the stain.”

-ούς      Examples: ο παππούς (o papús) meaning “the grandfather.”

-έας      Examples: ο γραμματέας (o gramatéas) meaning “the secretary.”

Feminine endings:

-ος      Examples: η μέθοδος (i méthodos) meaning “the method”; η άνοδος (i ánodos) meaning “the rise”; η κάθοδος (i káthodos) meaning “the descent”; η οδός (i odós) meaning “the street”; η λεωφόρος (i leofóros) meaning “the avenue.”

      Examples: η μητέρα (i mitéra) meaning “the mother”; η καρέκλα (i karékla) meaning “the chair”; η θάλασσα (i thálasa) meaning “the sea”; η ώρα (i óra) meaning “the hour”; η αγελάδα (i ageláda) meaning “the cow.”

      Examples: η λέξη (i léxi) meaning “the word”; η αγάπη (i agápi) meaning “the love”; η ψυχή (i psihí) meaning “the soul”; η ζάχαρη (i záhari) meaning “the sugar”; η οθόνη (i othóni) meaning “the monitor.”

-ού      Examples: η μαϊμού (i maimú) meaning “the monkey.”

      Examples: η ηχώ (i ihó) meaning “the echo.”

Neuter endings:

-ος      Examples: το λάθος (to láthos) meaning “the passion”; το γεγονός (to yegonós) meaning “the incident.”

-ο      Examples: το φυτό (to fitó) meaning “the plant”; το βιβλίο (to vivlío) meaning “the book”; το γραφείο (to grafío) meaning “the office”; το ξενοδοχείο (to xenodohío) meaning “the hotel”; το λεωφορείο (to leoforío) meaning “the bus.”

      Examples: το σπίτι (to spíti) meaning “the house”; το κουτί (to kutí) meaning “the box”; το πουλί (to pulí) meaning “the bird.”

      Examples: το πρόβλημα (to próvlima) meaning “the problem”; το μάθημα (to máthima) meaning “the lesson”; το θέμα (to théma) meaning “the subject.”

-ιμο      Examples: το φταίξιμο (to ftéximo) meaning “the fault”; το πλύσιμο (to plísimo) meaning “the washing.”

Major Exception:
There are some neuter nouns ending in -υ, which are the following:

  • βράδυ (vrádi) — “night”
  • στάχυ (stáhi) — “ear; the plant”
  • δόρυ (dóri) — “spear”
  • οξύ (oxí) — “acid”
  • δίχτυ (díhti) — “net”
  • δάκρυ (dákri) — “tear”

For more information on how to tell the gender of a noun, check out this video lesson.

4. Memorizing the Gender of a Noun in Greek

A Man Being Confused and Skeptical

As you might have noticed, the -ος (-os) ending is found in nouns of all three genders, so it’s difficult to guess the gender by the ending. In this case, you should try to find another nearby word, preferably an article, which indicates the gender of the noun.

But what if there’s no indication of the noun’s gender around? Then, you can check if the noun is stressed on its last syllable; if it is, you can at least be sure that it’s not a neutral noun.

Another tricky part of the Greek language gender rules which confuses a lot of learners is the fact that there are many nouns that end with -ος (-os), which can be either masculine or feminine. Those usually indicate a profession, such as ο/η γιατρός (o/i yatrós) meaning “doctor” or ο/η δικηγόρος (o/i dikigóros) meaning “lawyer.”

It’s easy to guess the gender of some Greek nouns that refer directly to a specific sex, like the words μητέρα or μπαμπάς, because they follow their sex. But that’s not always the case. For example, το αγόρι (to agóri) meaning “the boy” is not a masculine noun; it’s neuter!

The best thing you can do to memorize the gender of a noun in Greek is to learn the noun in its dictionary form together with its article. For example, the word γάλα (gála) meaning “milk” which ends in -α could give the impression that it’s feminine—but it’s neuter. So memorizing it as το γάλα (to gála) instead could help you avoid that confusion.

5. Gender Variations for Adjectives

Two Adjacent People Out of Paper

Adjectives can vary depending on the gender of the noun they define. Each adjective changes its ending in a different manner.

Let’s have a look at some examples below.

Normally, when the male adjective ends in -ος, then the feminine ending will be -η and the neuter ending will be -ο.

– καλ-ός / καλ-ή / καλ-ό

  • Greek: Αυτός o δάσκαλος είναι πολύ καλός.
  • Romanization: Aftós o dáskalos íne polí kalós.
  • Translation: “This (masculine) teacher is very good.”
  • Greek: Αυτή ή δασκάλα είναι πολύ καλή.
  • Romanization: Aftí i daskála íne polí kalí.
  • Translation: “This (feminine) teacher is very good.”
  • Greek: Αυτό το παιδί είναι πολύ καλό.
  • Romanization: Aftó to pedí íne polí kaló.
  • Translation: “This kid is very good.”

In the same manner, indicatively, the following adjectives change their ending when referring to masculine, feminine, or neuter nouns:

ελεύθερος (eléftheros) — “free”
άρρωστος (árrostos) — “sick”
όμορφος (ómorfos) — “good-looking”
άσχημος (áschimos) — “ugly”
έξυπνος (éxipnos) — “smart”

Another common category of adjectives includes masculine adjectives ending in -ος, changing the feminine to -α and the neuter to -ο.

– άδει-ος / άδει-α / άδει-ο

  • Greek: Ο χώρος ήταν άδειος.
  • Romanization: O hóros ítan ádios.
  • Translation: “The space was empty.”
  • Greek: Η αίθουσα ήταν άδεια.
  • Romanization: I éthusa ítan ádia.
  • Translation: “The classroom was empty.”
  • Greek: Το κουτί ήταν άδειο.
  • Romanization: To kutí ítan ádio.
  • Translation: “The box was empty.”

In the same manner, indicatively, the following adjectives change their ending when referring to masculine, feminine, or neuter nouns:

ωραίος (oréos) — “nice”
άγριος (ágrios) — “wild”
γαλάζιος (galázios) — “light blue”
γελοίος (yelíos) — “ridiculous”
αιώνιος (eónios) — “eternal”

Another category of adjectives affected by the gender of the noun is as follows:

– βαθ-ύς / βαθ-ιά / βαθ-ύ

  • Greek: Ο βαθύς ποταμός.
  • Romanization: O vathís potamós.
  • Translation: “The deep river”
  • Greek: Η βαθιά λίμνη.
  • Romanization: I vathiá límni.
  • Translation: “The deep lake”
  • Greek: Το βαθύ πηγάδι.
  • Romanization: To vathí pigádi.
  • Translation: “The deep water well”

In the same manner, the following adjectives change their endings when defining masculine, feminine, or neuter nouns:

ελαφρύς (elafrís) — “light”
βαρύς (varís) — “heavy”
μακρύς (makrís) — “long”
πλατύς (platís) — “wide”
παχύς (pahís) — “thick”

If you’re interested in learning more about Greek adjectives, you’re in luck!

Just take a look at our article on the Top 100 Greek Adjectives. And if you feel like digging deeper into Greek grammar, check out lessons 13-17 of our Intermediate series.

6. Conclusion

Recognizing the gender of each noun in Greek isn’t easy. We get it. However, if you follow the above tips and tricks, you’ll be able to guess the gender of a noun or an adjective accurately in most cases. With experience, practice, and study, we’re sure you’ll soon become a master of Greek noun gender.

At GreekPod101.com, we aim to provide you with everything you need to know about the Greek language in a fun and interesting way. Stay tuned for more articles like this one, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos, which are waiting for you to discover them!

You can also upgrade to Premium Plus and take advantage of our MyTeacher program to learn Greek with your own personal teacher, who will answer any questions you might have!

In the meantime, is there a noun or adjective that troubles you? Let us know in the comments.

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