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Express Your Love in Greek: Flirting, Romance, and More

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Love has always been an integral part of Greek culture. As such, the sheer number of Greek words for love and their accompanying romantic phrases should come as no surprise! 

In ancient Greece, people worshipped Aphrodite—the goddess of beauty and love—as well as Eros, the god of love and lust. There were also the Erotes, a small group of winged gods that carried around their bows and shot at people to make them fall in love. 

Many years later, Christianity was spread throughout Greece, leading to a whole new perception of love. The religion taught about having love for each other, not necessarily in a romantic context. 

Nowadays, rumor has it that modern Greeks are among the most loving partners. They are often described as communicative, charming, and caring. 

In this blog post, we’ll explore the magic world of love from a Greek point of view.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Words About Love
  2. Confess Your Affection: Pick-Up Lines & More
  3. Fall in Deeper: “I Love You,” and More
  4. Take it One Step Further: “Will You Marry Me?” & More
  5. Endearment Terms
  6. Must-know Love Quotes
  7. Conclusion

1. Words About Love

A Boy Holding a Heart-shaped Cushion

Let’s begin with the basics!

Here are some useful Greek love words and their meanings in English:

  • Greek: αγάπη (η)
  • Romanization: agápi (i)
  • Translation: “love” (fem. noun)
  • Greek: έρωτας (ο)
  • Romanization: érotas (o)
  • Translation: “eros” (masc. noun)
  • Greek: πάθος (το)
  • Romanization: páthos (to)
  • Translation: “passion” (neuter noun)
  • Greek: συναίσθημα (το)
  • Romanization: sinésthima (to)
  • Translation: “emotion” (neuter noun)
  • Greek: ενθουσιασμός (ο)
  • Romanization: enthusiazmós (o)
  • Translation: “excitement” (masc. noun)

We’re just warming up! Now, let’s take it one step at a time as we work through the following sections. 

2. Confess Your Affection: Pick-Up Lines & More

A Man Offering a Flower to a Woman

First things first, you can easily confess your affection in Greek by using one of these ready-to-use phrases:

  • Greek: Μου αρέσεις.
  • Romanization: Mu arésis.
  • Translation: “I like you.”
  • Greek: Θα ήθελα να σε γνωρίσω καλύτερα.
  • Romanization: Tha íthela na se gnoríso kalítera.
  • Translation: “I would like to get to know you better.”
  • Greek: Αισθάνομαι πολύ όμορφα, όταν είμαι μαζί σου.
  • Romanization: Esthánome polí ómorfa, ótan íme mazí su.
  • Translation: “I feel very nice when I am with you.”
  • Greek: Θα ήθελες να πάμε για έναν καφέ;
  • Romanization: Tha ítheles na páme yia énan kafé?
  • Translation: “Would you like to go for a coffee?”

Greeks are often talkative and are not afraid to express their feelings. Both men and women are used to  flirting, so the aforementioned phrases can be used by either a man or a woman. 


3. Fall in Deeper: “I Love You,” and More

A Young Couple being Happy and Holding Hands at the Beach

As you find yourself falling deeper and deeper in love, don’t worry—we’ve got your back!

If you’ve ever wondered how to say “I love you,” in Greek, here’s your answer:  

  • Greek: Σ’ αγαπώ.
  • Romanization: S’ agapó.
  • Translation: “I love you.”

Do you want to take it a step further? Then you can say:

  • Greek: Σε λατρεύω.
  • Romanization: Se latrévo.
  • Translation: “I adore you.”
  • Greek: Μου λείπεις.
  • Romanization: Mu lípis.
  • Translation: “I miss you.”
  • Greek: Δεν μπορώ να σταματήσω να σε σκέφτομαι.
  • Romanization: Den boró na stamatíso na se skéftome.
  • Translation: “I can’t stop thinking about you.”

And the ultimate confession: 

If you’re a man…

  • Greek: Είμαι ερωτευμένος μαζί σου!
  • Romanization: Íme erotevménos mazí su!
  • Translation: “I am in love with you!” 

If you’re a woman…

  • Greek: Είμαι ερωτευμένη μαζί σου!
  • Romanization: Íme erotevméni mazí su!.
  • Translation: “I am in love with you!”

As you might have noticed, there are two versions of “I am in love with you,” in Greek. This is due to the inflection of the passive voice participle. These words get declined similarly to adjectives; therefore, they should agree with the gender of the noun they refer to.

Consequently, when a man says it, the participle should be in its masculine form: ερωτευμένος. When a woman says it, the participle should be in its feminine form: ερωτευμένη


4. Take it One Step Further: “Will You Marry Me?” & More

A Man, Down on One Knee, Proposing to a Woman

Time has passed and it’s time to settle down. Well, you’ve reached the right section! Here are some sweet love phrases in Greek you can use to express your feelings, establish your relationship, and finally propose to the love of your life! 

  • Greek: Θέλεις να είμαστε μαζί;
  • Romanization: Thélis na ímaste mazí?
  • Translation: “Do you want us to be together?”
  • Greek: Πού πάει αυτή η σχέση;
  • Romanization: Pú pái aftí i shési?
  • Translation: “Where is this relationship going?”
  • Greek: Θέλεις να γνωρίσεις τους γονείς μου;
  • Romanization: Thélis na gnorísis tus gonís mu?
  • Translation: “Do you want to meet my parents?”
  • Greek: Θέλεις να συζήσουμε;
  • Romanization: Thélis na sizísume?
  • Translation: “Do you want to live together?”
  • Greek: Θέλεις να μείνουμε μαζί;
  • Romanization: Thélis na mínume mazí?
  • Translation: “Do you want to live together?”
  • Greek: Θέλεις να αρραβωνιαστούμε;
  • Romanization: Thélis na aravoniastúme?
  • Translation: “Do you want to get engaged?”

When it comes to a marriage proposal, you have plenty of choices:

  • Greek: Θα με παντρευτείς;
  • Romanization: Tha me pandreftís?
  • Translation: “Will you marry me?”
  • Greek: Θέλεις να με παντρευτείς;
  • Romanization: Thélis na me padreftís?
  • Translation: “Do you want to marry me?”
  • Greek: Με παντρεύεσαι;
  • Romanization: Me padrévese?
  • Translation: “Will you marry me?”
  • Greek: Θέλεις να παντρευτούμε;
  • Romanization: Thélis na padreftúme?
  • Translation: “Do you want to get married?”
  • Greek: Θέλεις να γίνεις η γυναίκα μου;
  • Romanization: Thélis na yínis i yinéka mu?
  • Translation: “Do you want to be my wife?”
  • Greek: Θέλεις να γίνεις ο άντρας μου;
  • Romanization: Thélis na yínis o ándras mu?
  • Translation: “Do you want to be my husband?”

How about starting a family? If you’re in that blessed phase of your life, you could simply say: 

  • Greek: Θέλεις να κάνουμε ένα παιδί;
  • Romanization: Thélis na kánume éna pedí?
  • Translation: “Do you want to have (do) a baby?”

5. Endearment Terms

A Loving Couple Hugging in the Countryside

Everybody loves being addressed in a sweet and loving way!

Don’t be shy. Feel free to use the following endearment terms with your partner. 

  • Greek: αγάπη μου
  • Romanization: agápi mu
  • Translation: “my love”
  • Greek: μωρό μου
  • Romanization: moró mu
  • Translation: “my baby”
  • Greek: ματάκια μου
  • Romanization: matákia mu
  • Translation: “my little eyes”
  • Greek: αστεράκι μου
  • Romanization: asteráki mu
  • Translation: “my little star”

Each of these endearments can be used for either a man or a woman, so feel free to use them without hesitation.

6. Must-know Love Quotes

Now that you’re well-equipped with a variety of words and phrases with which to shower your loved one in affection, let’s make one more stop. Below, you’ll find a few Greek love quotes translated in English as well as two popular proverbs on the topic. 

6.1 Ancient Greek Quotes About Love

  • Greek: Η αγάπη αποτελείται από μία ψυχή που κατοικεί σε δύο σώματα.
  • Romanization: I agápi apotelíte apó mia psihí pu katikí se dío sómata.
  • Translation: “Love consists of one soul that is living within two bodies.”

This phrase belongs to Aristotle, one of the most famous ancient Greek philosophers. 

  • Greek: Μία λέξη μας απελευθερώνει από όλο το βάρος και τον πόνο στη ζωή. Και αυτή η λέξη είναι: αγάπη.
  • Romanization: Miα léxi mas apeleftheróni apó ólo to város ke ton póno sti zoí. Ke aftí i léxi íne: agápi.
  • Translation: “One word sets us free from all the weight and the pain in life. And that word is: love.”

This one is attributed to Sophocles, who was definitely another ancient Greek romantic. Sophocles was one of the three tragedians of ancient Greece, and his plays have survived to this day. 

6.2 Greek Proverbs About Love

The concept of love has also influenced modern Greeks, who have shaped Greek folk wisdom. With that in mind, here are two of the most popular Greek proverbs about love:

  • Greek: Αγάπη χωρίς πείσματα δεν έχει νοστιμάδα.
  • Romanization: Agápi horís pízmata den éhi nostimada. 
  • Translation: “Love without a bit of stubborness isn’t tasteful.”
  • Greek: Εμείς μαζί δεν κάνουμε και χώρια δεν μπορούμε.
  • Romanization: Emís mazí den kánume ke hória den borúme.
  • Translation: “We can’t live with each other, neither can we live without one another.”

7. Conclusion

All in all, Greeks are loving and caring people. So, don’t hesitate to express your feelings—especially now that you know how to do so. Just use the most appropriate phrases from this article to take your relationship to the next level.

Do you want to learn more expressions and listen to their pronunciation? Then visit our list of Words and Phrases to Help You Describe Your Feelings

GreekPod101.com is dedicated to offering you a wide range of vocabulary learning resources, focusing on words and expressions used in everyday life. We aim to combine practical knowledge about the language, culture, and local customs in order to create a well-rounded approach to language learning. 

Start learning Greek today in a consistent and organized manner by creating a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com. Tons of free vocabulary lists, YouTube videos, and grammar tips are waiting for you to discover them! 

Before you go, let us know in the comments about your favorite Greek phrase about love. We look forward to hearing your thoughts.

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Negation in Greek: How to Create Negative Sentences

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Ever wondered how to use negation in Greek to create negative sentences?

Then you’re in the right place!

If you prefer expressing your opposition verbally (instead of nodding, for instance), then continue reading.

In this blog post, we’ll focus on negation in Greek and show you how to turn an affirmative sentence into a negative one. In addition, we’ll present you with the most common negation words and phrases, as well as the most popular ways to give a negative response to a question.

Are you ready?

Let’s get started!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Turning an Affirmative Sentence into a Negative Sentence
  2. Giving a Negative Response to a Question
  3. Negation Words and Phrases
  4. Double Negatives
  5. Conclusion

1. Turning an Affirmative Sentence into a Negative Sentence

A Woman in a Classroom Writing in Her Notebook

Rumor has it that Greek negation is one of the easiest parts of the language to learn. 

Modifying an affirmative sentence to have a negative meaning can be achieved by simply adding the particle δεν (den) – not before the verb in the indicative mood.

Here are some typical examples:

Affirmative SentenceNegative Sentence
  • Greek: Εγώ κάνω γυμναστική.
  • Romanization: Egó káno yimnastikí
  • Translation: “I exercise.”
  • Greek: Εγώ δεν κάνω γυμναστική.
  • Romanization: Egó den káno yimnastikí
  • Translation: “I don’t exercise.”

Affirmative SentenceNegative Sentence
  • Greek: Η Μαρία διαβάζει κάθε μέρα.
  • Romanization: I María diavázi káthe méra.
  • Translation: “Maria studies every day.”
  • Greek: Η Μαρία δεν διαβάζει κάθε μέρα.
  • Romanization: I María den diavázi káthe méra.
  • Translation: “Maria doesn’t study every day.”

Affirmative SentenceNegative Sentence
  • Greek: Θέλω να επισκεφτώ την Ελλάδα.
  • Romanization: Thélo na episkeftó tin Elláda..
  • Translation: “I want to visit Greece.”
  • Greek: Δεν θέλω να επισκεφτώ την Ελλάδα.
  • Romanization: Den thélo na episkeftó tin Eláda.
  • Translation: “I don’t want to visit Greece.”

When it comes to complex sentences, consisting of two or more clauses connected by the conjunction και (ke) – “and,” the particle “δεν” should be placed before each verb. In that way, you can negate the meaning of both sentences.

Affirmative SentenceNegative Sentence
  • Greek: Χθες πήγαμε σινεμά και φάγαμε ποπκόρν.
  • Romanization: Htes pígame sinemá ke fágame popkórn.
  • Translation: “Yesterday, we went to the cinema and we ate popcorn.”
  • Greek: Χθες δεν πήγαμε σινεμά και δεν φάγαμε ποπκόρν.
  • Romanization: Htes den pígame sinemá ke den fágame popkórn.
  • Translation: “Yesterday, we didn’t go to the cinema and we didn’t eat popcorn.”

However, in cases like this, you may want to negate only the first or second statement. The solution is simple: Just place a “δεν” before the verb you want to negate. 

Negating the 1st StatementNegating the 2nd Statement
  • Greek: Χθες δεν πήγαμε σινεμά και φάγαμε ποπ κορν.
  • Romanization: Htes den pígame sinemá ke fágame pop korn.
  • Translation: “Yesterday, we didn’t go to the cinema and we ate popcorn.”
  • Greek: Χθες πήγαμε σινεμά και δεν φάγαμε ποπ κορν.
  • Romanization: Htes den pígame sinemá ke den fágame pop korn.
  • Translation: “Yesterday, we went to the cinema and we didn’t eat popcorn.”

2. Giving a Negative Response to a Question

A Woman Gesturing in a Negative Way

Saying no every once in a while is not a bad thing. Therefore, when you need to answer “no” to a yes-or-no question, you can simply say: 

  • Greek: Όχι.
  • Romanization: Óhi.
  • Translation: “No.”

Here’s an example: 

Greek– Θέλεις να πάμε για καφέ;
– Όχι.
Romanization– Τhélis na páme yia kafé?             
– Óhi.
Translation– “Do you want to go for a coffee?”             
– “No.”

Or if you want to be more polite, you may add the verb ευχαριστώ (efharistó) – “to thank” at the end of your response.

Greek– Θέλεις να σου φτιάξω έναν καφέ;
– Όχι, ευχαριστώ.
Romanization– Τhélis na su ftiáxo énan kafé?             
– Óhi, efharistó.
Translation– “Do you want me to make you some coffee?”             
– “No, thank you.”

Moreover, you can also repeat the verb or the statement of the question using negation instead of a simple “όχι” answer.

Greek– Είναι αυτό δικό σου;
– Όχι, δεν είναι.
Romanization– Íne aftó dikó su?
– Óhi, den íne.
Translation– “Is this yours?”
– “No, it isn’t.”

3. Negation Words and Phrases

You can also make a sentence negative in Greek by using certain words and phrases. In this section, we’ll take a look at some of the most common Greek negation words and phrases, along with examples. These words are normally used in combination with “δεν,” resulting in a sentence with double negatives (which we’ll discuss in the next section of this blog post).

A Girl in Winter Clothes Raising Her Hand to the Camera Indicating She Doesn’t Want to be Photographed
  • Greek: ποτέ
  • Romanization: poté
  • Translation: “never”

Greek              Δεν έχω πάει ποτέ στην Ελλάδα.
Romanization              Den ého pái poté stin Elláda.
Translation              “I have never been to Greece.” 

  • Greek: πουθενά
  • Romanization: pouthená
  • Translation: “nowhere”

Greek              Χθες έβρεχε και δεν πήγαμε πουθενά.
Romanization              Hthes évrehe ke den pígame puthená.
Translation              “Yesterday, it was raining and we didn’t go anywhere.” 

  • Greek: κανείς
  • Romanization: kanís
  • Translation: “nobody”

Greek              Κανείς δεν ήρθε στα γενέθλιά μου.
Romanization              Kanís den írthe sta yenéthliá mu.
Translation              “Nobody came on my birthday.” 

  • Greek: τίποτα
  • Romanization: típota
  • Translation: “nothing”

Greek              Τίποτα δεν θα μας χωρίσει.
Romanization              Típota den tha mas horísi.
Translation              “Nothing will tear us apart.” 

  • Greek: ούτε…ούτε
  • Romanization: úte…úte
  • Translation: “neither…nor”

Greek              Δεν μου αρέσει ούτε το κρασί, ούτε η μπύρα.
Romanization              Den mu arési úte to krasí, úte i bíra. 
Translation              “I like neither wine, nor beer.” 

Last, but not least, we couldn’t omit negative commands. Since the imperative mood in Greek (which is the mood that expresses commands) doesn’t have its own negation form, it uses the negation form of the subjunctive mood: the following particle + the verb in the subjunctive mood.

  • Greek: μη(ν)
  • Romanization: mi(n)
  • Translation: “don’t”

Greek              Η μαμά κοιμάται. Μη φωνάζεις!
Romanization              I mamá kimáte. Mi fonázis!.
Translation              “Mommy is sleeping. Don’t yell.” 

If you want to sound more polite, then simply add the verb παρακαλώ (parakaló) – “please” at the end of the negative command. 

Greek              Έχω πονοκέφαλο. Μη μιλάς δυνατά, παρακαλώ.
Romanization              Ého ponokéfalo. Mi milás dinatá, parakaló.
Translation              “I’ve got a headache. Please, don’t speak loudly.” 

“Μην” can be combined with verbs (as we saw) as well as with active voice participles, which are formed by adding an -οντας or a -ώντας suffix to a verb.

Greek              Ο ήρωας έπεσε κάτω, μην έχοντας τη δύναμη να συνεχίσει.
Romanization              O íroas épese káto, min éhondas ti dínami na sinehísi.
Translation              “The hero fell down, not having the strength to continue.” 

4. Double Negatives

A Hand Ticking the Choice No on a Questionnaire

In Greek, double negatives only create a positive statement some of the time. It really depends on the choice of words.

Here’s an example of two negations making a positive statement:

Greek              Δεν θέλω να μην κοιμάσαι.
Romanization              Den thélo na min kimáse.
Translation              “I don’t want (you) not to sleep.”
Meaning              I want you to sleep.

Nevertheless, sometimes two negations make an even more negative statement. This usually happens with negative Greek words and phrases, like the ones we presented in the previous section of this blog post.

Greek              Το βιβλίο δεν είναι πουθενά.
Romanization              To vivlío den íne puthená.
Translation              “The book is nowhere.”
Meaning              The book is (very) difficult to find.

Interestingly, in Greek there are also triple negatives formed by repeating a negation word and including the pledge particle μα (ma) – “ma,” which expresses opposition. In that way, the negation is highlighted even more. 

Greek              Κανείς, μα κανείς δεν θα το μάθει.
Romanization              Kanís, ma kanís den tha to máthi.
Translation              “Νobody, but nobody won’t learn this.”
Meaning              Nobody will find out about this.

5. Conclusion

Is there a sentence or a phrase that you find difficult to negate? Let us know in the comments below!

As you should have noticed by now, Greek negation is pretty easy to learn and use. In other languages, there are many different ways to form a negation, which often include an auxiliary verb, such as “do” or “don’t” in English. 

This is definitely a cornerstone chapter of learning Greek, as negations can be used widely in our everyday lives. With enough studying and practice, you’ll be on your way to mastering Greek negation in no time, and we’ll be here for you every step of the way.

At GreekPod101.com, we aim to provide you with everything you need to know about the Greek language in a fun and engaging way. Blog posts like this one, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos, are waiting for you to discover them! And if you’d prefer a more customizable learning experience, you can upgrade your account to use our MyTeacher service, which will allow you to ask all your questions to your own personal native Greek teacher. Don’t forget to join our online community and discuss the lessons with other students!

Create your free, lifetime account today.

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Why is it Important to Learn Greek?

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“Why should I learn Greek?” 

If you’re asking this question to yourself right now, let me make this easier for you.

Why shouldn’t you learn Greek? I mean, you’ve got nothing to lose, right?

In this blog post, we’ll demonstrate all the important reasons why you should start learning Greek today.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. The Benefits of Learning a New Language
  2. Greece, Greeks & Greek
  3. Reasons for Learning Greek
  4. Is Greek Easy to Learn?
  5. How to Learn Greek
  6. Conclusion

1. The Benefits of Learning a New Language

A Happy Woman Holding Books

There are many reasons to learn a new language, but one of the most important reasons is that this process changes your way of thinking. In addition, learning a new language and getting in touch with different cultures can reveal new pathways to you that are out of reach right now. 

Indeed, there are many things that you cannot achieve unless you speak the local language. For example, good luck working, doing business, or even living in Greece without at least a rudimentary knowledge of Greek! 

Here are some of the most important benefits you can expect from learning a new language: 

  • Connecting with people from different cultural backgrounds
    Language is the core of effective communication, and learning a new language can get you in touch with new people and ideas. This exchange of opinions can only be viewed as beneficial, as it enhances your way of thinking and even contributes to the creation of a better version of yourself.
  • Advancing your career
    Globalization has brought all of us a little closer, especially in the business world. What if your next big step in your career lies in a foreign country? Would you miss the opportunity? Working in a foreign country is a unique and life-changing experience, which may lead to a better work-life balance and even more success.
  • Improving your memory
    Some people play bingo. Others solve riddles, crosswords, or Sudoku puzzles. And others decide to start learning a new language. Keeping our memory sharp should be one of our top priorities throughout our lives. Regardless of your age or academic background, you should consider learning a new language to tease your brain.

2. Greece, Greeks & Greek

The Acropolis of Athens

Oh, sunny Greece…

What can I say?

We could really talk for hours about Greece’s beauty. 

If you’re still not sure why you should learn Greek of all languages, consider this: 

If you’re looking for impressive history, rich culture, and some of the most picturesque islands of the Mediterranean, then this is the place to be. Not to mention the stunning sandy beaches and the iconic minimal architecture…

Greece has it all and much more. Visit Athens for a unique journey through ancient Greek culture, dive deep into the crystal-clear, blue waters of the Aegean Sea, and then enjoy a cocktail on a nearby island. 

However, it’s not all about sightseeing. It’s also about the people. And Greeks will not let you down!

They can literally become your new best friends in the blink of an eye, seeing as they’re very hospitable and highly communicative. And who knows? Maybe you’ll feel the urge to visit your new friends again…and again. 

Greek is the official language of Greece, and learning Greek will certainly get you a bit closer to the country’s culture.  

The Greek language is now mainly spoken in Greece as well as in Cyprus. The ancient Greeks settled on Cyprus around 1600 B.C., and that’s why they speak Greek. However, Cypriot Greek is slightly different from the Greek spoken in Greece; this is because Cypriot Greek is a dialect with a distinct pronunciation.

There are around 20 million speakers of Greek in the world, of which 14 million are native

3. Reasons for Learning Greek

Let’s take a look at some of the most important benefits of learning Greek: 

  1. To know Greek is to know one of the oldest and most useful languages in the world.
  2. By learning Greek, one can get a deeper understanding of European history and culture.
  3. The Greek alphabet is the base of the Roman alphabet.
  4. Knowing Greek will help one learn other European languages, such as French or English, more easily. An estimated twelve percent of the English vocabulary has Greek origins.
  5. One will gain an understanding of and an appreciation for Greece’s myths, history, and culture—the culture and traditions of Greece have been part of the Western Civilization for over 2500 years. Learning the language will allow one to explore (and someday pass down) this knowledge to the next generation.
  6. To do business or find a job in Greece, at least some understanding of the language is required.
  7. Knowing Greek will make traveling and getting around easier, and it will help you get the most out of your vacation in Greece.
  8. Learning Greek will help you get in touch with ancient Greek philosophy and theatre as well as modern Greek cinematography and literature.
  9. Greek cuisine is one of the most popular cuisines in the world, making Greece a worldwide foodies’ paradise. After learning Greek, you’ll be able to recognize and order exactly what you prefer in a local Greek taverna
  10.  Last but not least, the knowledge of Greek will help you connect and create meaningful relationships with your Greek friends and family.

4. Is Greek Easy to Learn?

A Very Happy Woman Holding a Book Above Her Head

Still wondering why to learn Greek? 

Believe it or not, Greek is relatively easy to learn. Although it’s not a Romance language, it showcases phonological features similar to those of English and many other European languages. Therefore, if you listen to someone speaking Greek, you’ll probably recognize many familiar syllables—and even entire words. 

This is mainly due to two major reasons: 

  • Many English words have been integrated into the Greek language. These words often include technology-related terminology, such as: λάπτοπ (láptop) – “laptop” / ίντερνετ (ínternet) – “internet.” 
  • The reverse is also true: Many Greek words have been integrated into the English language. These words are usually related to medical, political, and scientific terminology, such as: αστρονομία (astronomía) – “astronomy” / δημοκρατία (dimokratía) – “democracy” / μαθηματικά (mathimatiká) – “mathematics.”

Another thing that makes Greek easy to learn is its simple word order, which follows the SVO (Subject – Verb – Object) pattern. As a result, even a total beginner can create complete sentences in Greek from day one. 

On the other hand, Greek grammar is notoriously difficult, especially when it comes to the inflection of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, articles, and some participles. Nevertheless, there’s nothing you can’t overcome with study and practice.   

⇾ If you’re wondering how long it takes to learn Greek, check out our relevant blog post.

5. How to Learn Greek

A Woman Studying from Her Notebook

As if you needed another reason to learn Greek, did you know that getting started is easier than you think? Here are some of the most popular ways to start this language learning journey today: 

  • Traditional Teaching & Language Learning Centers
    This is one of the most common ways to learn a new language. Big language learning centers usually offer a plethora of different language lessons. However—since Greek is not one of the most popular languages—you may find it difficult to find a language learning center offering Greek lessons nearby. Freelance teachers are always another option. Nevertheless, finding an experienced Greek teacher might be a challenge, depending on the country in which you’re residing.
  • Non-formal Learning
    From joining a local Greek community to watching Greek movies or even Greek-language YouTube videos, there are endless options for non-formal learning. However, in order to benefit from all of these options, a minimum beginner level is required. Therefore, you should probably consider combining them with a language learning program, either offline or online.
  • Greek Learning Platforms & Apps
    Learning a new language has never been easier. Nowadays, you can start learning a new language right now and master it at your own pace. You can even talk with native Greek teachers, who will answer all your questions and offer valuable feedback. The GreekPod101 app is one of the most popular Greek learning apps worldwide and is here to help you make your language learning dream come true in no time.

6. Conclusion

Learning Greek is not as hard as you might have thought after all, right? 

As long as you find ways to incorporate Greek language learning into your everyday routine, you’ll be able to understand Greek in no time. 

What’s your favorite way to learn a new language?

Let us know in the comments below!

GreekPod101.com offers you high-quality, practical knowledge about the Greek language and culture. We aim to provide you with everything you need to learn about the Greek language in a fun and interesting way. Stay tuned for more articles like this one, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos

Happy learning!

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How Long Does it Take to Learn Greek?

A Useful Guide for Beginners

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How long does it take to learn Greek? Is Greek a difficult language to master? How can I learn Greek fast?

These questions (and many more) might pass through your mind as you set out to start learning Greek. Is there a definite answer to all of them? Well, actually no. 

However, by the time you’re done reading this blog post, you’ll have a clearer understanding of what it takes to achieve the different levels of Greek fluency. You’ll also walk away with useful tips on how to learn the Greek language more effectively and speed up your progress.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Is Greek a Difficult Language?
  2. How Long Does it Take to Achieve a Beginner Level?
  3. How Long Does it Take to Achieve an Intermediate Level?
  4. How Long Does it Take to Achieve an Advanced Level?
  5. How Can I Learn Greek Faster?
  6. Conclusion

1. Is Greek a Difficult Language?

Rumor has it that Greek is difficult to learn. But does this statement correspond to reality?

A Woman Laughing and Holding a Book Over Her Head

Well, it’s not super-easy. That’s for sure.

Greek is not a Romance language, meaning it does not make use of Latin characters. Although that fact alone might intimidate new learners, the reality is more encouraging. Greek is considered a stand-alone branch of the Indo-European language family, and it has heavily influenced almost every major European language. This is mainly because modern European civilization stems from Ancient Greek civilization.  

As a result, there are many words in English (and in European Romance languages) that were originally Greek. In addition, Greece has always been in touch with other European countries, creating cultural and commercial bonds. Therefore, the Greek language also contains many originally foreign words (from French, Italian, English, etc.).

The Greek alphabet shares many common characteristics with the English alphabet, though it also includes some unique features. The similarities, however, make learning Greek even easier.

Even from a phonetic perspective, many people state that Greek sounds a bit like Spanish, Italian, or Portuguese. Therefore, it doesn’t sound that extraordinary to American and European ears. 

At this point, we should note that the difficulty you’ll have learning Greek highly depends on your mother tongue, as well. For example, some people from Asian, Arab, or African countries find it harder to adjust because their mother tongue is far more different from Greek than European languages are. 

All in all, if you’re still looking for an accurate answer here, it is: No, Greek is not that hard to learn!

Below, we’ll take a look at how long it takes to learn Greek based on the level of knowledge you’re aiming for.

2. How Long Does it Take to Achieve a Beginner Level?

Time to achieveTaking as a reference the requirements of the A1 level on the CEFR scale, you will need approximately 100-120 hours of study.
What you will learn at this levelThe learner will have the ability to communicate with native speakers at a basic level. He or she will be able to…
  • …introduce himself/herself
  • ….describe the place of his/her residence
  • ….talk about the weather….discuss hobbies and activities
  • ….describe his/her family
  • ….give and receive directions and basic phrases on how to get around the city
  • ….talk about foods and drinks.
Example lessonSpeaking Perfect Greek at a Restaurant

3. How Long Does it Take to Achieve an Intermediate Level?

Time to achieveTaking as a reference the requirements of the B1 level, you will need approximately 180-250 hours of study.
What you will learn at this levelThe learner will be able to communicate at an intermediate level, on the following subjects:

Daily transactions
  • Business
  • Travels
  • The characteristics of products
  • Methods of payment
  • Services and activities
Example lessonMaking an Appointment in Greek

4. How Long Does it Take to Achieve an Advanced Level?

Time to achieveTaking as a reference the requirements of the C1 level, you will need approximately 400-520 hours of study.
What you will learn at this levelThe learner will be able to communicate at an advanced level. This simply means that the student should be able to express his/her views on a wide variety of subjects, speaking without long disruptions and communicating effectively with public and private services for a wide variety of transactions.

In addition, at this level, the learner has gained some knowledge of the Greek culture.
Example lessonTop 10 Greek Holidays and Festivals

5. How Can I Learn Greek Faster?

A Smiling Woman Reading a Book

In the modern world, our daily routines are getting faster and faster as we try to serve many different roles throughout the day. That being said, our daily tasks often leave limited time (if any) for our hobbies, let alone learning a new language. 

Learning a new language, however, doesn’t have to take up much time within your daily schedule. The key is to find smart ways to practice—and why not even entertain yourself at the same time?

Here are a few ways to learn Greek fast: 

  • Watch Greek-Related Netflix Shows

    Although Netflix does not include much Greek-language content, there are many series and movies that are related to Greek history, mythology, or general lifestyle. These shows provide the perfect opportunity to take a step closer to the Greek culture, even if you don’t know a single word of Greek.

A Couple Watching a Movie at the Cinema
  • Watch Greek Movies

    Even if you’re not sure whether you want to pick up a new language, watching some Greek movies is the perfect way to test the waters. Greek cinematography includes movies of many genres and themes, so you’re sure to find a Greek movie that interests you.

    Tip: If you’re a complete beginner, watch the movie with English subtitles. This will familiarize you with how Greek sounds and may help you pick up some phrases. Later on, as you start learning Greek and making progress, you may switch to Greek subtitles (or no subtitles at all!).

A Happy Child Looking at a Laptop’s Screen
  • Watch Greek YouTube Channels

    Another great way to speed up your Greek learning is to watch Greek YouTube videos. These videos don’t have to be exclusively educational. There are many Greek channels covering a range of topics, from infotainment to travel and from Greek songs to famous Greek YouTubers commenting on a wide variety of subjects. One thing is for sure: You’ll be able to get yourself involved in the Greek language and culture much easier this way!

  • Read Greek Books
  • If you’re a bookworm and an intermediate Greek learner, it might be a good idea to start reading Greek books. Your options are literally endless, and you’ll be able to enhance your vocabulary quickly and easily.

    Tip: If you’re a beginner, then children’s books might be just perfect, since they use basic vocabulary and simple sentences.


A Man and a Woman Learning a New Language with Post-it Notes
  • Place Post-It Notes Around the House

    Wondering how to learn Greek vocabulary when you’re short on time? Write some Greek words and phrases on Post-It notes and place them strategically around the house—you’ll be surprised how much faster you can learn Greek this way. We tend to learn faster when we’re actively involved with the language, so what could be better than reviewing the Greek names of basic objects again and again without even noticing?

    Tip: Change the Post-It notes regularly in order to learn even more words and phrases.

  • Switch Your Smartphone’s Menu to Greek

    If you have an understanding of the basics of the Greek language, then the key to speeding up your learning progress might be as simple as switching your smartphone’s menu to Greek. This might seem annoying at first, but you’ll soon realize the benefits of reading Greek on a daily basis.

  • Invest in a Greek Language Learning App

    One of the best ways to learn a new language on the go is to utilize a language learning app like the one offered by GreekPod101.com. 


Conclusion

Learning Greek is not as hard as you might have thought after all, right?

As long as you find ways to incorporate Greek language learning into your everyday routine, you’ll be able to understand Greek in no time. 


What’s your favorite way to learn a new language? Let us know in the comments below!

Did you know you could begin learning Greek right now in an easy and fun way? Well, now you do! Create your free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com today!

GreekPod101 offers you high-quality, practical materials and lessons covering everything about the Greek language and culture. We aim to provide you with valuable lessons that will keep you interested and engaged from day one. Stay tuned for more articles like this one, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos—all this and more are waiting for you to discover them!

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Greek Proverbs: Little Pearls of Wisdom

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Some people say that proverbs are the accumulated wisdom of a culture. Indeed, most Greek proverbs can be used in a wide variety of situations and can really make a difference when used at the right moment. Greek proverbs also incorporate many cultural elements, so studying them is a great way to dive deeper into the Greek culture and expand your vocabulary.

In this blog post, we’ll present you with the most popular Greek proverbs, along with their translations and meanings. Feel free to use them while chatting with your Greek friends—it’s sure to impress them!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Animal-Related Greek Proverbs
  2. Greek Proverbs About Time
  3. Greek Proverbs About Education & Language
  4. Greek Proverbs About Caution
  5. Miscellaneous Greek Proverbs
  6. Conclusion

1. Animal-Related Greek Proverbs

Various Animals

Sometimes, we can see aspects of our own lives reflected in the animal world. Here are a few popular Greek proverbs featuring animals—can you relate to any of these? 

Greek ProverbΕίπε ο γάιδαρος τον πετεινό κεφάλα.
RomanizationÍpe o gáidaros ton petíno kefála.
Translation“The donkey called the rooster big-headed.”
NotesThe word πετεινός (petinós) is a synonym of κόκορας (kókoras), both meaning “rooster.” Nowadays, it’s more common to use the latter.
Context of UsageThis proverb is often said between friends in a humorous context, when the one is mocking the other about a characteristic that the two share.

Greek ProverbΌταν λείπει η γάτα, χορεύουν τα ποντίκια.
RomanizationÓtan lípi i gáta, horévun ta podíkia.
Translation“When the cat’s away, the mice dance.”
NotesIn Greek, it’s common to use the word λείπω (lípo) as an equivalent of “to be away.” Literally, in other cases, it may also be translated as “to miss” or “to be missed.”
Context of UsageImagine taking care of a younger sibling for a while when your parents are away. When the child realizes that the parents are gone, (s)he starts to do all the “forbidden” things, such as eating a lot of chocolate or being extremely loud. In cases like this, you could use the proverb.

Greek ProverbΗ καμήλα δεν βλέπει την καμπούρα της.
RomanizationI kamíla den vlépi tin kabúra tis.
Translation“The camel can’t see its own hump.”
Context of UsageYou might use this saying when someone is harshly criticizing someone else, without thinking of their own disadvantages or faults.

Greek ProverbΕγώ το είπα στον σκύλο μου και ο σκύλος στην ουρά του.
RomanizationEgó to ípa ston skílo mu ke o skílos stin urá tu.
Translation“I said this to my dog and my dog said it to its tail.”
Context of UsageSomeone could say this when your mother asks you to do something, and you then make someone else do it instead.

Greek ProverbΌσα δεν φτάνει η αλεπού, τα κάνει κρεμαστάρια.
RomanizationÓsa den ftáni i alepú, ta káni kremastária.
Translation“What the fox cannot reach, it turns them into hangers.”
Context of UsageThis proverb refers to a situation where someone tends to derogate someone else’s achievements because, deep down inside, they know they can’t achieve the same things. This phrase is most commonly used in an ironic tone.

Greek ProverbΈνας κούκος δεν φέρνει την άνοιξη.
RomanizationÉnas kúkos den férni tin ánixi.
Translation“A cuckoo bird does not bring the spring.”
Context of UsageThis proverb might be used when someone sees a positive indication of something and quickly believes that the end result will also be positive.

➤ Learn more about animals’ names in Greek by studying our relevant vocabulary list or our video on Common Animals in the Park

2. Greek Proverbs About Time

A Woman Holding and Pointing to a Clock

Our lives are encompassed by time, and this fact has drawn much speculation from great thinkers and entire societies the world over. Below are some common Greek-language proverbs on the topic of time. 

Greek ProverbΟ χρόνος είναι ο καλύτερος γιατρός.
RomanizationO hrónos íne o kalíteros yatrós.
Translation“Time is the best doctor.”
Context of UsageWhen a friend of yours gets hurt or breaks up with their partner, you could say this phrase to make him or her feel better.

Greek ProverbΤο καλό πράγμα αργεί να γίνει.
RomanizationTo kaló prágma aryí na gíni.
Translation“The good thing takes time to happen.”
Context of UsageYou might use this proverb when a friend of yours grows disappointed about the progress of his plans. It would be an encouraging way to say that everything will be great in the long run. 

Greek ProverbΚάλλιο αργά παρά ποτέ.
RomanizationKálio argá pará poté.
Translation“Better late than never.”
NotesThe word κάλλιο (kálio) is a rarely used informal version of the adverb καλύτερα (kalítera), both meaning “better.”
Context of UsageLet’s say your mother decides to go back to school in order to follow her dreams. It’s obviously better to do something later in life than to not do anything at all. 

Greek ProverbΌποιος δεν θέλει να ζυμώσει, δέκα μέρες κοσκινίζει.
RomanizationÓpios den théli na zimósi, déka méres koskinízi.
Translation“Whoever does not want to knead, sifts for ten days.”
Context of UsageYou might say this to motivate a friend of yours who’s procrastinating to take action.

Greek ProverbΑγάλι-αγάλι γίνεται η αγουρίδα μέλι.
RomanizationAgáli-agáli yínete i agourída méli.
Translation“The unripe grape becomes sweet like honey slowly-slowly.”
NotesThe phrase αγάλι-αγάλι (agáli-agáli) means “slowly-slowly.”
Context of UsageThis proverb would be encouraging to say to a friend who’s disappointed with the progress of their plans. It would reassure them that they will achieve their goals.

Greek ProverbΜάτια που δεν βλέπονται γρήγορα λησμονιούνται.
RomanizationMátia pu den vlépode grígora lismoniúde.
Translation“Eyes that don’t see each other frequently are soon forgotten.”
NotesThe verb λησμονώ (lizmonó) is not that common and we could say that it hasn’t got an exact equivalent in English. It’s something between “to forget (someone or something)” and “to fade into oblivion.”
Context of UsageImagine if you used to hang out with a friend every day, but as soon as one of you goes abroad for a long period, you don’t even text or think of each other much.

➤ Memorizing these time-related proverbs will be an impressive feat, but don’t stop there. Learn how to tell the time in Greek today!

3. Greek Proverbs About Education & Language

Some Books and a Graduation Hat on Top of Them

Education and learning have long been an integral part of Greek life, with formal schooling dating back to Ancient Greece. Here are just a few Greek proverbs and sayings on the topic! 

Greek ProverbΗ γλώσσα κόκαλα δεν έχει και κόκαλα τσακίζει.
RomanizationI glósa kókala den éhi ke kókala tsakízi.
Translation“The tongue has no bones but it crushes bones.”
NotesIn Greek, we usually say σπάω κόκαλα (spáo kókala), meaning “to break bones.” This is a special occasion where the verb τσακίζω (tsakízo) is used instead.
Context of UsageThis is often said when someone says really hurtful words to another person.

Greek ProverbΤα πολλά λόγια είναι φτώχεια.
RomanizationTa polá lógia íne ftóhia.
Translation“Many words are poverty.” (“Silence is golden.”)
NotesLiterally, the word φτώχεια (ftóhia) means “poverty.” Greeks appreciate getting the message across with as few words as possible.
Context of UsageYou might say this when someone keeps babbling without getting to the point.

Greek ProverbΆνθρωπος αγράμματος, ξύλο απελέκητο.
RomanizationÁnthropos agrámatos, xílo apelékito.
Translation“Illiterate man, row wood.”
Context of UsageThis saying is used to describe someone who is ignorant due to lack of education. It’s considered an insult, so use it carefully.

Greek ProverbΔάσκαλε που δίδασκες και νόμο δεν εκράττεις.
RomanizationDáskale pu dídaskes ke nómo den ekrátis.
Translation“Oh, teacher that you taught but you don’t implement your teachings.”
NotesThe verb εκράττεις (ekrátis) is an older form of the verb κρατώ (krató), meaning “to hold” or “to keep.”
Context of UsageYou could use this saying when a friend of yours does not implement his own advice. 

4. Greek Proverbs About Caution

A Man Who Has Slipped on a Wet Floor

While it’s good to look for the best in people and to make the most of every situation, it’s also crucial to practice caution and common sense. Below are a few common Greek proverbs used to advise caution. 

Greek ProverbΟ διάβολος έχει πολλά ποδάρια.
RomanizationO diávolos éhi polá podária.
Translation“The devil has many legs.”
NotesThis phrase aims to highlight that evil can take many forms.
Context of UsageWhen a friend of yours has just faced a difficult situation and thinks that it’s totally over, you could advise him to keep alert by using this phrase.

Greek ProverbΌπου ακούς πολλά κεράσια, κράτα μικρό καλάθι.
RomanizationÓpu akús polá kerásia, kráta mikró kaláthi.
Translation“When you hear about many cherries, hold a small basket.”
Context of UsageWhen a friend of yours gets overly excited about an event or an opportunity, you might want to tell him to be more cautious and not to expect too much. 

Greek ProverbΌποιος βιάζεται σκοντάφτει.
RomanizationÓpios viázete skondáfti.
Translation“Whoever is in a hurry stumbles.”
Context of UsageWhen a friend of yours is doing something in a hurry that requires concentration and attention to detail, you might use this proverb to warn them that the end result will not be good.

Greek ProverbΌταν καείς από τον χυλό, φυσάς και το γιαούρτι.
RomanizationÓtan kaís apó ton hiló, fysás ke to yaúrti.
Translation“When you get burned by porridge, you also blow the yogurt.”
Context of UsageThis proverb is used to describe someone who has already faced some difficult situations and gotten hurt. Now, when a seemingly good situation arises, that person will continue to act cautious to avoid being hurt again. 

5. Miscellaneous Greek Proverbs

A Traditional Greek Dance
Greek ProverbΈξω από τον χορό πολλά τραγούδια λέγονται.
RomanizationÉxo apó ton horó polá tragúdia légode.
Translation“Outside the dance-circle many songs are sung.”
NotesThis phrase is inspired by Greek celebrations, which often include group dancing in a circle.
Context of UsageYou might say this phrase after someone gives advice on a difficult situation they’ve never experienced.

➤ Interested in Greek music? Take a look at the Top 10 Greek Songs

Greek ProverbΟι πολλές γνώμες βουλιάζουν το καράβι.
RomanizationI polés gnómes vuliázun to karávi.
Translation“Too many opinions sink the boat.”
Context of UsageThis saying refers to a group of people who are trying to make a decision, but each person has a different opinion. It’s usually said by someone who undertakes to find the option that’s best for everyone.

Greek ProverbΣπίτι μου, σπιτάκι μου και σπιτοκαλυβάκι μου.
RomanizationSpíti mu, spitáki mu ke spitokaliváki mu.
Translation“My home, my sweet home, my sweet hut.”
NotesThis phrase is equivalent to the English phrase, “Home, sweet home.”
Context of UsageComing home after a long time away will definitely make you want to say this phrase. 

➤ Wondering how to describe your home’s interior in Greek? Take a look at our relevant vocabulary list for some useful words! 

Greek ProverbΑγαπά ο Θεός τον κλέφτη, αγαπά και τον νοικοκύρη.
RomanizationAgapá o Theós ton kléfti, agapá ke ton nikokíri.
Translation“God loves the thief, but He also loves the homeowner.”
NotesThis proverb aims to highlight that evil might take over temporarily, but good reigns in the end. 
Context of UsageNext time you’re referring to someone who does not act appropriately, you could use this phrase to express that he’ll get discovered or punished eventually. 

Greek ProverbΑπό αγκάθι βγαίνει ρόδο και από ρόδο αγκάθι.
RomanizationApó angáthi vyéni ródo ke apó ródo angáthi.
Translation“A rose comes out of a thorn and a thorn comes out of a rose.”
NotesThis phrase presents the general truth that a person should not be characterized as good or bad based on their parents’ character.
Context of UsageThis would be an apt phrase to use when a very talented child is born to not-so-talented parents, or vice-versa.

Greek ProverbΚράτα με να σε κρατώ να ανεβούμε το βουνό.
RomanizationKráta me na se krató na anevúme to vunó.
Translation“Hold my hand and I’ll hold yours so we can climb the mountain.”
NotesThis proverb is here to remind us that cooperation results in greater achievements.
Context of UsageYou could say this when you have a very difficult group assignment, but you want to encourage your partners.

Greek ProverbΜπρος γκρεμός και πίσω ρέμα.
RomanizationBros gremós ke píso réma.
Translation“Cliff in front and stream behind.”
NotesThe word μπρος (bros) is an informal, shortened version of the word εμπρός (embrós), meaning “in the front.”
Context of UsageYou could say this when you feel trapped in a dilemma and the choices you have available seem to be equally bad.

Greek ProverbΤο μήλο κάτω από τη μηλιά θα πέσει.
RomanizationTo mílo káto apó ti miliá tha pési.
Translation“The apple will fall right below the apple tree.”
Context of UsageWhen a child has inherited a skill or a bad habit from their parents, you could use this phrase in order to state that it was to be expected.

➤ Speaking of apples, here are the names of more Fruits and Vegetables in Greek! 

Greek ProverbΗ καλή μέρα από το πρωί φαίνεται.
RomanizationI kalí méra apó to proí fénete.
Translation“You can tell a good day from the morning.”
Context of UsagePessimists often say this phrase when something bad happens early in the morning, believing that more bad things will come later in the day. This use denotes sarcasm, but it could also be used in a non-sarcastic way when something good happens.

Greek ProverbΈγιναν από δυο χωριά χωριάτες.
RomanizationÉyinan apó dio horiá horiátes.
Translation“They became villagers from two different villages.”
Context of UsageThis saying refers to two people who have quarrelled so much that they don’t talk to each other anymore. It’s also used simply to underline the intensity of an argument.

6. Conclusion

Now you have at your fingertips some of the most popular Greek proverbs to memorize. By studying them, you’ll gain more fluency as well as a better understanding of Greek culture as a whole.

Do you know any other Greek proverbs? Which one is your favorite? 

GreekPod101.com offers you high-quality, practical knowledge about the Greek language and culture. We aim to provide you with everything you need to know about the Greek language in a fun and interesting way. Stay tuned for more articles like this one, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos.

Until next time, happy learning! 

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English Words in Greek You Should Know

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Happy Students Holding Their Notebooks

Did you know that learning Greek will involve coming across many familiar English words?

Well, since Greece is a member of the European Union and one of the top tourist destinations in the Mediterranean, it’s not surprising that the majority of Greeks speak fluent English. In addition, English lessons are integrated into the educational curriculum, so Greek children familiarize themselves with the language from a very young age. 

Within this context, there are many English words in Greek that are used in everyday communication. In some cases (such as when technology-related terminology is used), these borrowed English words are even preferred over their Greek equivalents. 

As technology has continued to thrive over the past few decades, a new, informal version of written—or better said, typed—Greek has emerged, widely known as Greeklish. As you might already know, Greek is not a Romance language, so being able to type in Greek using an English keyboard facilitated digital communication.

In this blog post, we’ll take a look at the different versions of Greeklish as well as some common English words used in the Greek language. In addition, we’ll introduce you to plenty of English words which are derived from Greek.


Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Introduction to Greeklish
  2. Greeklish Examples
  3. Loanwords vs. Greeklish
  4. English Words Derived From Greek
  5. Conclusion

1. Introduction to Greeklish

‘Greeklish’ is a portmanteau word that combines the words Greek and English. This term refers to the tendency of native speakers to type Greek with Latin characters. 

The first use of Greeklish is believed to have been by the Hellenic National Meteorological Service (Ε.Μ.Υ.), during times when Greek characters were not fully supported in systems or in the digital world. However, there is no official record as to when exactly Greeklish made its first appearance. 

One thing is sure, though: Greeklish has flourished among youngsters, along with the development of technology. For example, one of the first uses of Greeklish was in SMS messages, mainly due to the character restrictions. Typing in Greek would require more characters for certain vowel and consonant sounds, such as: αι > e and ντ > d. Later, the use of Greeklish expanded to all digital communications, where passing on a message quickly was more important than spelling and taking the time to accentuate words.

A Laptop, a Tablet, and Two Smartphones

We could say that there are two distinctive styles of Greeklish: 

  • Phonetic: Writing the words with Latin characters, according to the way they sound. For example, μπαμπάς > babas.
  • Spelling-based: Writing the words with Latin characters, taking into account the Greek spelling and transliterating them on a letter-by-letter basis. For example, μπαμπάς > mpampas.

However, most people who use Greeklish have a mixed style, with some words being typed according to their spelling and other words being typed according to their sound. Sometimes, even numbers are used. For example, θάλασσα > 8alassa. It’s a matter of personal preference, really.

Despite these redeeming features of Greeklish, it is perceived as a very informal method of communication and has already started to fade out significantly. This decline in popularity is largely due to various Greek forums that prohibited typing in Greeklish in an attempt to preserve the Greek language and provide quality content for their viewers. Many people supported this idea in their personal lives and raised awareness of how detrimental Greeklish could be concerning the spelling skills of young students and people in general. 

With the fading of SMS messages and the evolution of technology and communication methods, there is no longer the need to type fewer characters. And with the wide support of Greek characters across systems, there is no real excuse for choosing Latin characters over Greek ones.


2. Greeklish Examples

A Sketch of Two Hands Combining Two Puzzle Pieces

Here are a few examples of Greeklish to show you the different styles of using this informal communication method. 

  • Greek: Γεια σου, τι κάνεις;
  • Phonetic Greeklish: Ya su, ti kanis?
  • Spelling-based Greeklish: Geia sou, ti kaneis?
  • Mixed version: Gia su, t knc? 
  • Translation in English: Hello, how are you doing?
  • Greek: Είμαι καλά, εσύ;
  • Phonetic Greeklish: Ime kala, esi?
  • Spelling-based Greeklish: Eimai kala, esy?
  • Mixed version: Ime kl, esi? 
  • Translation in English: I am well, you?
  • Greek: Καλά είμαι κι εγώ. Θέλεις να πάμε αύριο για έναν καφέ?
  • Phonetic Greeklish: Kala ime ki ego. Thelis na pame avrio ya enan kafe?
  • Spelling-based Greeklish: Kala eimai ki egw. Theleis na pame aurio gia enan kafe?
  • Mixed version: Kl ime ki ego. Thelis n pame avrio gia kafe? 
  • Translation in English: I am fine, as well. Would you like to go for a coffee tomorrow?
  • Greek: Γιατί όχι. Στις επτά είναι καλά;
  • Phonetic Greeklish: Yati ohi. Stis epta ine kala?
  • Spelling-based Greeklish: Giati oxi. Stis epta einai kala?
  • Mixed version: Gt ohi. Stis epta ine kl? 
  • Translation in English: Why not. Does seven o’clock work for you?
  • Greek: Μια χαρά! Τα λέμε αύριο.
  • Phonetic Greeklish: Mia hara! Ta leme avrio.
  • Spelling-based Greeklish: Mia xara! Ta leme aurio.
  • Mixed version: Mia hara. Tlm avrio. 
  • Translation in English: Excellent! See you tomorrow.

Learn how to offer an invitation in Greek, and how to reject one politely!

3. Loanwords vs. Greeklish

A Woman within a Frame Holding a Magnifying Lens

As we said earlier, Greeklish refers to typing Greek using Latin characters. Loanwords, on the other hand, are foreign words which have been integrated into the Greek language to such an extent that they’re written with Greek letters according to how they sound.

Here is a quick list of common English words used in Greek:

LoanwordEnglish Equivalent
κέικcake
κέτσαπketchup
μπάρμπεκιουbarbeque
μπέικονbacon
σάντουιτςsandwich
τοστtoast
μπλέντερblender
πόστερposter
σέικερshaker
μπικίνιbikini
πουλόβερpullover
σορτςshorts
ινστιτούτοinstitute
μέικαπmakeup 
σουπερμάρκετsupermarket
τεστtest
καγκουρόkangaroo
γκολgoal
άουτout
οφσάιντoffside
ματςmatch
μάρκετινγκmarketing
εξπρέςexpress
λάπτοπlaptop
κομπιούτερcomputer
ίντερνετinternet
σάιτ(web)site
τάμπλετtablet
λάιτlight (low on calories)
μπάσκετbasket
βόλεϊvolley
τζιπjeep
μιούζικαλmusical
χιούμορhumor

At this point, we should note that unlike native Greek nouns, almost all of the ones above do not get inflected. They remain the same in speech regardless of whether they are singular or plural, for example.

Therefore:

Singular: το κέικPlural:  τα κέικ

Singular: το λάπτοπPlural: τα λάπτοπ

Singular: το μπλέντερPlural: τα μπλέντερ

Of course, there are hundreds of loanwords. But referencing all of them would go well beyond the scope of this article. 

Most Greek learners love these words, because they’re easy to remember and are not affected very much by Greek grammar.

4. English Words Derived From Greek

A Woman Reading a Book

There is another category of words that combine English with Greek: English words derived from the Greek language. As strange as it might seem, this category is vast and includes a wide variety of Greek words and terminologies which have been integrated into the English language. 

Here is a list of some of the most popular English words with Greek roots:

English WordOriginal Greek Word
democracyδημοκρατία (dimokratía)
EuropeΕυρώπη (Evrópi)
dinosaurδεινόσαυρος (dinósavros)
anonymousανώνυμος (anónimos)
marathonμαραθώνιος (marathónios)
melancholyμελαγχολία (melanholía)
phobiaφοβία (fovía)
psychologyψυχολογία (psiholoyía)
panicπανικός (panikós)
planetπλανήτης (planítis)
acrobatακροβάτης (akrovátis)
apologyαπολογία (apoloyía)
comedyκωμωδία (komodía)
dramaδράμα (dráma)
emphasisέμφαση (émfasi)
harmonyαρμονία (armonía)
economyοικονομία (ikonomía)
sarcasmσαρκασμός (sarkasmós)
hierarchyιεραρχία (ierarhía)
characterχαρακτήρας (haraktíras)
telephoneτηλέφωνο (tiléfono)
programπρόγραμμα (prógrama)
gastronomyγαστρονομία (gastronomía)
dialogueδιάλογος (diálogos)
epilogueεπίλογος (epílogos)
oenologyοινολογία (inoloyía)
homophobiaομοφοβία (omofovía)
etymologyετυμολογία (etimoloyía)
asteroidαστεροειδής (asteroidís)
planetariumπλανητάριο (planitário)
utopiaουτοπία (utopía)
photographyφωτογραφία (fotografía)
zoologyζωολογία (zooloyía)
biologyβιολογία (violoyía)
astronomyαστρονομία (astronomía)
telescopeτηλεσκόπιο (tileskópio)
anarchyαναρχία (anarhía)
architectureαρχιτεκτονική (arhitektonikí)
technologyτεχνολογία (tehnoloyía)

In fact, there are so many words of Greek origin in the English language that it’s possible to write large texts—or even entire speeches—in English using almost entirely words of Greek origin. A good example of this is the speech of Mr. Xenophon Zolotas in 1957, who was then the director of the Bank of Greece.

Curious to learn more? You can read an article about this historical speech online.

Conclusion

If you’ve reached this point, we’re sure that you’re already amazed by the influence these two languages have had on each other. The most surprising fact is that there are so many Greek words in the English language that, as you can see now, they could be used to create an entire speech!

Many learners of Greek are pleased to know that there are so many familiar words in the Greek language. This definitely makes things easier for novice learners, who tend to get disappointed by the complexity of Greek grammar and spelling. 

On the other hand, Greeklish might seem a viable solution for those who just want to chat casually in Greek. But remember that this peculiar tendency is clearly fading out as the years pass by. Therefore, we wouldn’t recommend using Greeklish (except with really close friends), as it might give a bad impression and, in some cases, even be considered disrespectful. 

At GreekPod101.com, we aim to provide you with everything you need to learn the Greek language in a fun and interesting way. Stay tuned for more articles like this one, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos, which are waiting for you to discover them!

You can also upgrade to Premium PLUS and take advantage of our MyTeacher program to learn Greek with your own personal teacher, who will answer any questions you might have!

In the meantime, can you think of any other English words that derive from Greek? Let us know in the comments section!

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A Brief Overview of Greek Culture

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The culture of Greece has evolved over thousands of years. From Cycladic and Minoan civilizations to modern Greek society, each period has shaped and left its footprint on Greek culture as we know it today. 

On this page, we’ll explore some of the most important aspects of Greek culture, including philosophy, religion, art, and traditional holidays. Keep reading to enter the fascinating world of modern Greek culture.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Philosophy & Religion
  2. Family & Work
  3. Art
  4. Food
  5. Holidays & Observances
  6. Conclusion

1. Philosophy & Religion

A Greek Orthodox Chapel in Santorini

Philosophy and religion play a huge role in Greek culture and traditions. Becoming familiar with these aspects of Greek society will not only immerse you in the culture, but also boost your language learning! 

A- Ancient Greek Philosophers

Socrates, Aristotle, Plato, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, and so many others… Ancient Greeks showcased a clear tendency toward philosophy, which emerged from their urge to understand the world around them as well as the meaning of life. Ancient Greek philosophy rose around the sixth century BC and continued to flourish throughout the Hellenistic period. This set the basis for the early development of different sciences, including astronomy, mathematics, physics, and biology. 

B- Greek Orthodox Church

Most Greeks identify as Orthodox Christians and this highly influences the society as a whole. Nearly every Greek village has its own church, which also serves as a meeting point for the villagers. There are also plenty of chapels on top of mountains and on the edge of cliffs, offering spectacular views. If you have the chance to visit a Greek church or chapel, please feel free to do so regardless of your beliefs or religion. Just make sure to wear conservative clothing—no shorts or trousers, and not showing too much skin. 


2. Family & Work

Greek culture values family, which is an integral part of the social structure in Greece. Family members develop very strong bonds—even members of the extended family can be found around the house. Children are expected to care for their elderly parents and usually live nearby (or even in the same house), even if they have their own family. Greeks tend to be very proud of their heritage, and the family offers psychological and economic support throughout their lives. 

On the other hand, interactions in the workplace are similar to those of other European countries. Worklife normally involves eight-hour shifts five days a week. Many people are working or investing in the tourism sector, which is the most important industry in the country. 

Nevertheless, Greece underwent a major economic crisis from 2007 to 2009, resulting in a dramatic reduction of the standard monthly wage. For the past several years, Greece has been taking consistent steps toward increasing the standard wage and creating a favorable economic environment for investments. 


3. Art

The arts thrived in Ancient Greece. Back then, minimalism was prominent—for example, thin lines and geometrical patterns were very popular. And this was just the start, since Greek civilization eventually gave birth to Western civilization. Even today, many Greek art pieces have managed to sneak their way into art-lovers’ hearts. Let’s explore some of the most famous Greek art pieces of all time!

A- Αρχιτεκτονική (Arhitektonikí) – “Architecture”

A Photo of the Parthenon

When you hear ‘Greek architecture,’ the first thing that probably comes to your mind is “The Parthenon” in the Acropolis of Athens. Indeed, η Ακρόπολη της Αθήνας (i Akrópoli tis Athínas), or “the Acropolis of Athens,” is an ancient town at the highest level of the city and it serves as the cornerstone of Greek architecture. People from all over the world come to Greece to admire it. We can say with all certainty that this is the most famous sample of Ancient Greek architecture.

Other, more contemporary pieces of Greek architecture are the traditional white houses with blue shades of the Greek Aegean islands. This is where the sea meets the sky. These homes are minimal and iconic at the same time.     

B- Γλυπτική (Gliptikí) – “Sculpting”

Of all surviving art from Ancient Greece, the sculptures are most prominent today. Try finding a large museum in Europe with zero ancient Greek sculptures in it—believe me, it’s harder than it looks!

Some of the most famous Greek sculptures include: 


C- Ζωγραφική (Zografikí) – “Painting” 

While painting did flourish in Ancient Greece, the natural substances that were used as paints faded over the years. As a result, the surviving collection of Greek paintings is a bit smaller.

One of the most important collections, which was able to withstand the wear and tear of time, consists of the Minoan frescoes. These pieces, painted on walls, mainly represent aspects of everyday Minoan life. To this day, you can admire some of the oldest samples of Greek painting within the Minoan Palace, as well as in the Heraklion Archaeological Museum.

In addition, you might have heard of these famous Greek painters: 


D- Λογοτεχνία (Logotehnía) & Ποίηση (Píisi) – “Literature & Poetry”

Greek literature dates back to the ancient times, spanning from 800 BC until today. Epic poems, such as Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, make up a great portion of early Greek literary masterpieces.

Later on, many Greek writers gained worldwide fame. One of the most important Greek writers was certainly Odysseas Elytis, a representative of romantic modernism who won a Nobel Prize in Literature in 1979. Before him, the prominent poet Giorgos Seferis made history in 1963 by becoming the first Greek to win the Nobel Prize. Seferis is largely known for his poems, many of which were influenced by Hellenism and his love for Greece. He also composed a few works of prose, most of which were published posthumously. 

Poet C.P. Cavafy became famous worldwide for his poem Ιθάκη (Itháki), or “Ithaca,” and Dionysios Solomos is considered Greece’s national poet. The first two verses of Solomos’s poem Ύμνος εις την Ελευθερίαν (Ímnos is tin Eleftherían), or “Hymn to Freedom,” later became the national anthem of Greece and Cyprus.

Other famous Greek writers include: 


E- Θέατρο (Théatro) – “Theatre”

Ancient Greek Theatre in Ephesus

Love of theatre is one of the most popular characteristics of Greek culture, and for good reason: the Greek culture is a theatrical one.

It all began with Ancient Greek drama, which consisted of two genres: tragedy and comedy. This form of theatre reached its peak around 500 BC. By the way, did you know that the word “tragedy” is derived from the Greek word τραγωδία (tragodía)? Well, now that you do, let’s take a look at this unique form of performing arts. 

Ancient Greeks thought highly of the power of speech. Therefore, they combined speech with movement and singing to create an influential form of drama. Most tragedies are based upon myths and their main characteristic is catharsis—the purification of emotions that spectators experience at some point during the performance. 

The most famous playwrights of this genre were Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Many of their works are still being performed today in theatres of all kinds, even in Ancient Greek theatres. 

However, Greek theatre wasn’t all about drama. Aristophanes was a famous Ancient Greek comic playwright, today considered to be the “Father of Comedy” and one of the best-known early satirists. Some of his most popular plays include The Women at the Thesmophoria Festival and The Frogs.

When you visit Greece, you should definitely search for any plays being performed in Ancient Greek theatres, such as Epidaurus or the Odeon of Herodes Atticus. It will be a unique experience in terms of location and acoustics. The summer is the best time to do this. 

4. Food

A Plate of Traditional Greek Souvlaki

Oh, the Greek cuisine…!

Greek culture and food go hand in hand.

When fresh vegetables meet local cheese, meat, and olive oil, something magical happens. Greek cuisine is an acknowledged representative of the broader Mediterranean cuisine. The most popular Greek dishes include:

  • παστίτσιο (pastítsio)
  • μουσακάς (musakás)
  • φασολάδα (fasoláda
  • γεμιστά (yemistá)
  • σουβλάκι (suvláki)

In Greece, you can taste all of the above at nearly any ταβέρνα (tavérna), or restaurant with Greek cuisine. Greeks love to eat along with their family and friends. Therefore, they often meet and enjoy drinking some ούζο (úzo) or τσίπουρο (tsípuro), accompanied by a variety of Greek delicacies, known as μεζέδες (mezédes)—small dishes of traditional Greek food.

Have you ever eaten or heard of any of these traditional Greek foods? 

If you want to learn more about Greek cuisine, check out our relevant blog post. 

5. Holidays & Observances

A Greek Flag with Santorini Island in the Background

Greeks don’t miss any chance to spend public holidays with their friends and family. The two most important Greek holidays are:

  • Revolution Day (March 25)

    After nearly 400 years under Ottoman rule and an almost decade-long revolution, Greece finally became an independent country on February 3, 1830. The Greek Revolution that began on March 25, 1821, is one of the most important chapters of Greek history and it’s celebrated across the country. Interestingly, the Greeks don’t celebrate their independence as there is no public holiday to commemorate the events of February 3, 1830.

    March 25 is a national holiday for Greeks, meaning that the schools are closed. Nevertheless, on the business day immediately before that, each school organizes a feast with songs, poems, short school plays, and traditional dances. Each classroom is decorated with laurel wreaths and small Greek flags as a sign of patriotism. 

    Here is the slogan of the Greek Revolution, which is often included in various acts of the celebration. 

    Greek: Ελευθερία ή Θάνατος!
    Romanization: Elefthería í Thánatos!
    Translation: “Freedom or Death!”

    Since religion is an integral part of Greek culture, we should mention that March 25 is also a religious holiday where the Greek Orthodox Church celebrates the Annunciation of the Virgin Mary by the Archangel Gabriel.

  • Ohi Day (October 28)

    On October 28, 1940, Ioannis Metaxas—the dictator of Greece at that time—refused the ultimatum made by Italian dictator Benito Mussolini. This was the start of a Greek-Italian war, which marked Greece’s involvement in World War II. The word ΌXI (ÓHI), or “NO” in uppercase letters, is iconic for Greeks as it represents Metaxas’s refusal.

    This is another national holiday, also commemorated in schools one day before. It celebrates the courage of Greeks to resist, a trait which is often praised in the celebrations. 

6. Conclusion

Greek culture is rich, and we couldn’t possibly cover all its aspects in a single lesson. However, we hope that you’re now a step closer to understanding Greek culture as well as the traits of modern Greek society. 

At GreekPod101.com, we aim to combine cultural insight with useful Greek language materials in order to create a well-rounded approach to language learning. 

Start learning Greek today in a consistent and organized manner by creating a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com. Tons of free vocabulary lists, YouTube videos, and grammar tips are waiting for you! 

Before you go, let us know in the comments how Greek culture compares to that in your country. We look forward to hearing your thoughts!

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A Journey Through Authentic Greek Food

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Finding the right words to describe Greek cuisine is almost impossible. You just need to taste it for yourself—we’re sure that you’ll be amazed! In this article, we’ll help you find your own words to describe iconic Greek dishes and unique Greek food items. 

All traditional Greek foods are based on the Mediterranean diet, usually containing fresh vegetables, pasta, cheese, and extra virgin olive oil. Greek foods are full of flavor since they often include onion, garlic, and a variety of herbs and spices. Although Greek cuisine is not spicy, its rich taste will certainly surprise you.

Of course, there are many unique vocabulary words associated with Greek cuisine, so keep reading if you want to know exactly what to order (and how to order it) during your next visit.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Let's Cook in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Must-Try Traditional Greek Dishes
  2. Unique Greek Products
  3. Authentic Greek Gyros vs. Overseas Gyros
  4. Food-Related Vocabulary
  5. Simple Recipes to Make Authentic Greek Food at Home
  6. Conclusion

1. Must-Try Traditional Greek Dishes

Imagine that you’re at a traditional Greek taverna, browsing through a handwritten menu made with love. These are some of the most popular Greek dishes you should definitely try!

  • Greek: μουσακάς (ο)
  • Romanization: musakás
  • Ingredients: eggplant, potato, ground meat, béchamel

When fresh eggplants and potatoes meet frizzled, fatless ground beef with spices, something magical happens. Add a smooth béchamel sauce, sprinkle with grated cheese, and…perfection! 

This dish consists of thin layers of fried eggplants and potatoes, which are placed inside a deep tray. Then, a ground beef sauce is poured on top in order to gently cover all empty spots. Last, but not least, a béchamel sauce is added and grated cheese is sprinkled on before the tray goes into the oven. There it will stay until the top turns golden brown. 

The result is a real treat for your taste buds!

  • Greek: παστίτσιο (το)
  • Romanization: pastítsio
  • Ingredients: bucatini pasta, grounded graviera cheese, ground meat, tomato sauce, béchamel

This dish might seem very similar to μουσακάς, but it’s a whole different world of deliciousness. In this case, layers of pasta replace the eggplant and potato. The top is filled with béchamel and the tray finally goes in the oven.

Greek: φασολάδα (η)
Romanization: fasoláda
Ingredients: white beans, carrots, tomatoes, celery, onion

Φασολάδα is a rich and highly nutritious soup, containing local white beans and fresh vegetables. When boiled to perfection, the beans are soft and add a unique thickness to the soup. Φασολάδα is a staple of modern Greek cuisine, with many Greek families eating it quite often (especially religious families during the Great Lent).

Traditional Greek Stuffed Vegetables

Photo by Badseed, under CC BY-SA 3.0

  • Greek: γεμιστά (τα)
  • Romanization: yemistá
  • Ingredients: glutinous rice, tomatoes, bell peppers, herbs, onion, minced meat (optional)

The word γεμιστά actually means “stuffed.” This traditional Greek dish consists of stuffed tomatoes, peppers, and sometimes even zucchini, which are stuffed with rice, herbs, and (optionally) minced meat. The stuffed vegetables are baked in the oven and are often served with oven-baked potatoes.

  • Greek: στιφάδο (το)
  • Romanization: stifádo
  • Ingredients: rabbit meat, pearl onions, tomatoes, red wine, cinnamon

This dish is really special. Rabbit and glazed, sweet little pearl onions will surely surprise your mouth. All of this is in a thin tomato sauce which covers each precious bite. With its strong flavor, this dish will surely remind you of French cuisine.

2. Unique Greek Products

The ingredients of Greek cuisine play the most important role in a dish’s end result. Greece is blessed to produce some of the purest organic vegetables, olive oils, and of course the most exclusive Greek product: feta cheese

Let’s take a closer look…

 A Small Bowl Full of Olive Oil
  • Greek: ελαιόλαδο
  • Romanization: eleólado
  • Translation: “olive oil”

Greek olive oil is praised worldwide and many producers have won several international competitions for the taste and purity of their olive oil. It’s not a coincidence that Ancient Greeks used to massage their body and hair with olive oil, which was used as a natural remedy for the skin.

A Close-up Image of Two Green Olives on a Branch
  • Greek: ελιά
  • Romanization: eliá
  • Translation: “olive”

An exquisite oil is always produced from high-quality raw materials. Greek olive oil comes from some of the most tasteful olives in the Mediterranean. 

In fact, the olive tree was considered sacred in Ancient Greece. According to the local mythology, a contest between Athena and Poseidon to determine who would become Athens’ protector, resulted in the creation of the first olive tree.

Moreover, an olive wreath was the prize of the Ancient Greek Olympic Games. The winner wore this wreath on their head, enjoying one of the most prestigious moments of their life. 

A Slice of Feta Cheese
  • Greek: φέτα
  • Romanization: féta
  • Translation: “feta cheese”

Feta cheese is a semi-soft (or semi-hard) white cheese soaked in brine. In 2002, the European Commission recognized φέτα as a protected designation of origin product. Thus, nowadays, you may find authentic Greek feta only in the European market.

This cheese works wonders in salads, although it’s often offered as an appetizer. In some places of Greece, it may also be fried and served with local honey. If you want a taste of Greek cuisine and have the chance to try this, don’t miss it!

A Carafe and Glass of Greek Ouzo Alcohol Spirit
  • Greek: ούζο
  • Romanization: úzo
  • Translation: “ouzo” traditional drink with alcohol

Ούζο is one of the most iconic alcoholic Greek drinks. It’s an aromatic, anise-flavored apéritif which is perfectly paired with seafood and small Greek appetizers called μεζέδες (mezédes), or “mezze.” It’s usually served with ice, and many locals dilute it with some water due to its strong taste and alcohol content.

3. Authentic Greek Gyros vs. Overseas Gyros

A Greek Gyro Dish
  • Greek: γύρος
  • Romanization: yíros
  • Translation: “Greek gyros” dish

Gyros is often thought to be Greece’s national dish!

In reality, gyros is only the most popular Greek fast-food item. The national dish of Greece is the white bean soup that we saw above. Gyros is either served on a plate or within a warm pita bread, along with onion, tomato, fried potatoes, and tzatziki sauce. 

In various countries abroad, many Greek restaurants offer gyros. However, more often than not, its flavor differs from that of the gyros in Greece. Originally, it’s made of thinly sliced or shaved pork or chicken meat that has been roasting in a vertical rotisserie—a roasting style that’s not very common outside of Greece. The meat quality, cut of meat, and seasoning also play important roles in giving Greek gyros its distinct taste and texture.

4. Food-Related Vocabulary

Here are some useful vocabulary words and phrases to help you describe your experience with Greek food: 

  • Greek: μαγειρεύω
  • Romanization: mayirévo
  • Translation: “to cook”
  • Greek: ελληνική κουζίνα
  • Romanization: elinikí kuzína
  • Translation: “Greek cuisine”
  • Greek: αλμυρό
  • Romanization: almiró
  • Translation: “savory” / “salty”
  • Greek: γλυκό (το) / γλυκό
  • Romanization: glikó
  • Translation: “dessert” / “sweet”
  • Greek: Θα ήθελα μια χωριάτικη σαλάτα, παρακαλώ.
  • Romanization: Tha íthela mia horiátiki saláta, parakaló.
  • Translation: “I would like a Greek salad, please.”
  • Greek: Η μπριζόλα συνοδεύεται από ρύζι ή από πατάτες;
  • Romanization: I brizóla sinodévete apó rízi í apó patátes?
  • Translation: “Does the steak come with rice or french fries?”

Do you want to expand your vocabulary a bit more?

We‘ve got you covered with our food-related vocab lists:


5. Simple Recipes to Make Authentic Greek Food at Home

You don’t need to be a chef to enjoy Greek food! 

Organize a Greek-themed night at home, ideally with a good Greek movie. Below, we’ll show you how to make Greek food at home! We’ve chosen two extra-simple yet tasty authentic Greek dishes we’re sure you’ll love.

A Bowl of Tzatziki

Photo by Nikodem Nijaki, under CC BY-SA 3.0

  • Greek: τζατζίκι
  • Romanization: tzatzíki
  • Ingredients: 2 medium cloves of garlic, 300g Greek yogurt, 1 cucumber, 2 tbsp olive oil, 2 tbsp vinegar or lemon juice, dill, salt, pepper
  • Recipe: Chop and smash the two cloves of garlic in a mortar. Grate the cucumber and add 1 tbsp of vinegar and some salt. Squeeze the cucumber with paper towels to drain its juices. Doing this ensures that the tzatziki won’t be too watery. In a bowl, add the Greek yogurt, the grated and drained cucumber, some freshly chopped dill, olive oil, a tbsp of vinegar, and some salt and pepper.
  • Bonus Tip: Serve it with french fries or pita bread, and you won’t regret it!

Traditional Greek Salad
  • Greek: χωριάτικη σαλάτα
  • Romanization: horiátiki saláta
  • Translation: rustic salad (also known as Greek salad)
  • Ingredients: 1 tomato, 1 red onion, 1 cucumber, 1 green pepper, 100g feta cheese, salt, pepper, oregano, olive oil
  • Recipe: Cut the vegetables into medium-sized pieces, according to your preferences. Season with a lot of olive oil, salt, pepper, and oregano. Add some cubes (or even a slice) of feta cheese on top.

6. Conclusion

I don’t know about you, but writing this article has made my mouth water!

Or, as we say in Greek: 

  • Greek: Μου τρέχουν τα σάλια!
  • Romanization: Mu tréhun ta sália!
  • Translation: “I’m drooling!” (Literally: “My saliva is running!”)

Of course, Greek cuisine is vast and we couldn’t possibly include everything. That said, we really tried to give you a well-rounded “taste.”  

Start learning Greek today in a consistent and organized manner by creating a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com. Tons of free vocabulary lists, YouTube videos, and grammar tips are waiting to be discovered.

In the meantime, have you tried any of these dishes? What’s your favorite Greek food?

Let us know in the comments below!

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An Easy-Breezy Greek Grammar Overview

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Grammar books usually consist of endless pages of rules and exceptions…so we’ve decided to make everything simpler for you!

In this overview of modern Greek grammar, we’ll introduce you to the very basics of Greek grammar, from vocabulary to cases. Therefore, if you’re contemplating learning Greek, then you’ve come to the right place!

In the following sections, you’ll find all of the basic grammar principles of the Greek language so you can start your language learning off on the right foot.  

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. General Rules
  2. Verbs
  3. Nouns & Articles
  4. Adjectives
  5. Adverbs
  6. Conclusion

1. General Rules

A Happy Student Wearing a Graduation Hat

We’ve got some good news for you!

Greek grammar shares some similarities with English grammar: 

  • Both languages use the same types of words
  • Both languages have a similar sentence structure

That being said, let’s explore these similarities in the following sections! 

1 – Vocabulary

Just like the English language, Greek features the following word types:

  • Nouns
    η γάτα i gáta – “the cat
  • Articles
    η γάτα – i gáta – “the cat”
  • Adjectives
    η μικρή γάτα – i mikrí gáta – “the small cat”
  • Verbs
    Εγώ τρέχω. – Egó trého. – “I run.”
  • Pronouns
    Εγώ τρέχω. – Egó trého.- “I run.”
  • Adverbs
    Εγώ τρέχω γρήγορα. –  Egó trého grígora. – “I run fast.”
  • Conjunctions / Linking Words
    Εγώ έχω έναν σκύλο και μία γάτα. – Egó ého énan skílo ke mía gáta. – “I have a dog and a cat.”
  • Prepositions
    Εγώ είμαι από την Ελλάδα. – Egó íme apó tin Elláda. – “I am from Greece.”

If you feel like expanding your vocabulary, check out our dedicated articles:

Customize your learning process by creating your own Word Bank, where you can categorize new words and even print them out!

2 – Sentence Structure

Both languages generally follow the SVO pattern (Subject-Verb-Object) when forming sentences. This is something that spurs many people forward with their plans to learn Greek and encourages those who have recently started. If you create your free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com, you’ll be able to create your first simple sentences from Lesson 1.

A Girl Reading a Book
Greek: Η Μαρία διαβάζει ένα βιβλίο.
Romanization: I María diavázi éna vivlío.
Translation:Maria reads a book.”
Subject – Who?
Η Μαρία
Verb – Action
διαβάζει
Object – What?
ένα βιβλίο.

If you want to learn more, check out our Word Order article, where you’ll find extended analyses of the SVO pattern, along with some other less-common sentence patterns. 

2. Verbs

A chapter that every Greek language learner struggles to master is verb conjugations. You see, according to the Greek verb system, verbs in Greek conjugate based on the subject of the sentence, the tense, and the mood.

1 – Tenses

The tenses of Greek verbs are:

  • Present: A continuing action, something happening continuously or repeatedly, a general truth,  or something that is in the process of happening. – It corresponds to the present simple and present continuous.

    Example:
    Greek: Εγώ μαγειρεύω κάθε μέρα.
    Romanization: Egó mayirévo káthe méra.
    Translation: “I cook every day.”
  • Aorist: An action that happened in the past. Provides no information on how long it took, or whether the results are still in effect. – It corresponds to the past simple.

    Example:
    Greek: Εγώ μαγείρεψα χθες.
    Romanization: Egó mayírepsa hthes.
    Translation: “I cooked yesterday.”
  • Imperfect: An action that happened in the past for a long period of time or in a repetitive way. – It corresponds to the past continuous.

    Example:
    Greek: Την προηγούμενη εβδομάδα, εγώ μαγείρευα κάθε μέρα.
    Romanization: Tin proigúmeni evdomáda, egó mayíreva káthe méra.
    Translation: “Last week, I was cooking every day.”
Two Children Cooking
  • Future simple: An action that will take place once or momentarily in the future.

    Example:
    Greek: Εγώ θα μαγειρέψω αύριο.
    Romanization: Egó tha mayιrépso ávrio.
    Translation: “I will cook tomorrow.”
  • Future continuous: An action that will take place in the future continuously, repeatedly, or for a long time period. 

    Example:
    Greek: Εγώ θα μαγειρεύω κάθε μέρα.
    Romanization: Egó tha mayιrévo káthe méra.
    Translation: “I will be cooking every day.”
  • Present perfect: An action that has already taken place.

    Example:
    Greek: Εγώ έχω μαγειρέψει.
    Romanization: Egó ého mayιrépsi.
    Translation: “I have cooked.”
  • Past perfect: An action that happened in the past before another action or at a certain time in the past.

    Example:
    Greek: Μέχρι τις 2 μ.μ, εγώ είχα μαγειρέψει.
    Romanization: Μéhri tis dío (metá mesimvrían) egó íha mayιrépsi.
    Translation: “By 2 p.m. I had cooked.”
  • Future perfect: An action that will have taken place in the future by a certain time point.

    Example:
    Greek: Μέχρι τις 2 μ.μ, θα έχω μαγειρέψει.
    Romanization: Μéhri tis dío (metá mesimvrías) egó tha ého mayιrépsi.
    Translation: “By 2 p.m. I will have cooked.”

2 – Moods

Are you in the mood for some more in-depth knowledge?

As we have already mentioned, Greek verbs conjugate according to the mood, as well. 

Here are the five moods of Greek verbs, along with examples of what they look like:

  • Indicative mood: Presents the action or the event as something certain or real (e.g. an objective fact).

    Example:
    Greek: Εγώ μαγειρεύω κάθε μέρα.
    Romanization: Egó mayirévo káthe méra.
    Translation: “I cook every day.”
  • Subjunctive mood: Presents the action or the event as something wanted, expected, or wished for.

    Example:
    Greek: Εγώ θέλω να μαγειρεύω κάθε μέρα.
    Romanization: Egó thélo na mayirévo káthe méra.
    Translation: “I want to cook every day.”
  • Imperative mood: May express a command (order), request, or desire.

    Example:
    Greek: Mαγείρεψε τώρα!
    Romanization: Mayírepse tóra!
    Translation: “Cook now!”
  • The participle:

    – The uninflected form has an adverbial function and may indicate time, manner, cause, condition, etc.

    Example:
    Greek: Ο χρόνος περνάει γρήγορα μαγειρεύοντας.
    Romanization: O hrónos pernái grígora mayirévodas.
    Translation: “Time passes by quickly while cooking.”

    – The inflected form has the function of an adjective, so it needs to agree in gender, number, and case with the noun it defines. It corresponds to the past participle when used on its own in speech.

    Example:
    Greek: Το κρέας είναι μαγειρεμένο.
    Romanization: To kréas íne mayireméno.
    Translation: “The meat is cooked.”
  • The infinitive: Uninflected form. Not to be confused with the English infinitive. The Greek infinitive is used for the formation of certain tenses: present perfect, past perfect, and future perfect. It corresponds to the past participle when used as part of the verb in the aforementioned tenses.

    Example:
    Greek: Εγώ έχω μαγειρέψει.
    Romanization: Egó ého mayιrépsi.
    Translation: “I have cooked.”

    Greek: Μέχρι τις 2 μ.μ, εγώ είχα μαγειρέψει.
    Romanization: Μéhri tis dío (metá mesimvrían) egó íha mayιrépsi.
    Translation: “By 2 p.m. I had cooked.”

    Greek: Μέχρι τις 2 μ.μ, θα έχω μαγειρέψει.
    Romanization: Μéhri tis dío (metá mesimvrían) egó tha ého mayιrépsi.
    Translation: “By 2 p.m. I will have cooked.”

3. Nouns & Articles

Nouns and articles are another important aspect of Greek grammar. They are gendered and get declined according to each case.

1 – Gender

In Greek grammar, gender is a way of classifying nouns, and this system certainly perplexes many new Greek learners. All Greek nouns are assigned to one of three genders:

Many Different Pets
  • Masculine – e.g. ο σκύλος – o skílos – “the dog”
  • Feminine – e.g. η γάτα – i gáta – “the cat”
  • Neuter – e.g. το ποντίκι – to pondíki – “the mouse”

As you might have already noticed, there are also different articles for each gender category. Generally, the articles should match the gender of the noun. 

Check out our Greek Word of the Day and expand your vocabulary! Learning a new word each day along with its article will quickly familiarize you with this concept.

2 – Cases

Moreover, nouns change their suffixes according to their placement within a sentence. Therefore, there are four cases:

  • Nominative: In this case, the noun is the subject or predicate of the sentence.

    Example:
    Greek: Ο σκύλος τρέχει.
    Romanization: O skílos tréhi.
    Translation: “The dog is running.”

    Greek: Αυτό είναι ένας σκύλος.
    Romanization: Aftó íne énas skílos.
    Translation: “This is a dog.”
  • Genitive: This case is typically used to express possession or indirect objects, among other things.

    Example:
    Greek: Η μπάλα του σκύλου είναι κόκκινη.
    Romanization: I bála tu skílu íne kókkini.
    Translation: “The dog’s ball is red.”
  • Accusative: Here, the noun is typically the object of the sentence or part of a prepositional phrase.

    Example:
    Greek: Εγώ χαϊδεύω τον σκύλο.
    Romanization: Egó haidévo ton skílo.
    Translation: “I pet the dog.”

    Greek: Η μπάλα είναι για τον σκύλο.
    Romanization: I bála íne ya ton skílo.
    Translation: “The ball is for the dog.”
  • Vocative: This is used when addressing someone or something. 

    Example:
    Greek: Σκύλε, κάτσε!
    Romanization: Skíle, kátse!
    Translation: “Dog, sit!”

4. Adjectives

Like in English, adjectives are usually placed before the noun. 

Example:
Greek: ο μικρός σκύλος.
Romanization: o mikrós skílos
Translation: “the small dog”

However, adjectives get declined according to the gender of the noun they refer to, as well as the number and the case. 

Example:
Greek: η μικρή γάτα
Romanization: i mikrí gáta
Translation: “the small cat”

Greek: η ουρά της μικρής γάτας  
Romanization: i urá tis mikrís gátas
Translation: “the tail of the small cat”

Greek: οι μικρές γάτες  
Romanization: i mikrés gátes
Translation: “the small cats”

5. Adverbs

We saved this category for last, because…guess what?! Adverbs in Greek don’t get inflected! These words remain the same, regardless of the way they’re used in speech.

A Girl Hugging a Dog

Generally, adverbs are placed either right after the verb or at the end of the sentence.

Example:
Greek: Ο σκύλος τρέχει γρήγορα.
Romanization: O skílos tréhi grígora.
Translation: “The dog is running fast.”

6. Conclusion

That’s (almost) all, folks!

Sure, there’s so much more to analyze about Greek grammar! Whole books are written for that purpose!

However, this wasn’t our intention here. We simply wanted to introduce you to the basic Greek grammar principles so you can start making sense of it right from the beginning.

Greek is a wonderful language and, although the grammar may seem a bit complicated, we’re sure you are going to master it in no time! 

Start learning Greek today for free and discover our many articles, vocabulary lists, and YouTube videos

Before you go, let us know in the comments which aspect of Greek grammar is most challenging for you so far. We’d love to hear from you and help you out with anything you’re struggling with.

Happy Greek learning!

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Popular Sayings & Quotes in Greek

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Quotes are an essential part of every language, as they demonstrate how the local people perceive important things about life. With this in mind, we’ve prepared for you a comprehensive blog post on the most popular sayings and quotes in Greek.

Take a step closer to the Greek language and culture, and start using these quotes today.


Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Quotes About Success
  2. Quotes About Life
  3. Quotes About Time
  4. Quotes About Love
  5. Quotes About Family
  6. Quotes About Friendship
  7. Quotes About Food
  8. Quotes About Health
  9. Quotes About Language Learning
  10. Conclusion

1. Quotes About Success

A Happy Student Who Earned an A on an Essay

Who doesn’t want to be successful? Raise your hands, please!

Oh, I thought so… Anybody?

Here are some quotes about success in Greek to motivate you in your everyday life:

  • Greek: Για να πετύχεις στη ζωή χρειάζεσαι δύο πράγματα: άγνοια και αυτοπεποίθηση.
  • Romanization: Ya na petíhis sti zoí hriázese dío prágmata: ágnia ke aftopepíthisi.
  • Translation: “To succeed in life, you need two things: ignorance and confidence.”
  • Greek: Έχω αποτύχει ξανά και ξανά και ξανά στη ζωή μου και αυτός είναι ο λόγος που πετυχαίνω.
  • Romanization: Ého apotíhi xaná ke xaná ke xaná sti zoí mu ke aftós íne o lógos pu petihéno.
  • Translation: “I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life and that is why I succeed.”
  • Greek: Επιτυχημένος είναι ο άνθρωπος που μπορεί να θέσει σταθερά θεμέλια με τα τούβλα που οι άλλοι έχουν πετάξει πάνω του.
  • Romanization: Epitihiménos íne o ánthropos pu borí na thési statherá themélia me ta túvla pu i áli éhun petáxi páno tu.
  • Translation: “A successful man is one who can lay a firm foundation with the bricks others have thrown at him.”

Intrigued to learn more? Check out our vocabulary list of the Top 11 Quotes About Success in Greek

2. Quotes About Life

A Group of Students Smiling

Many ancient Greek philosophers have studied life and developed many theories about our whole existence. But this was just the beginning. Since then, many people worldwide have tried to decrypt the miracle of life from their point of view.

Here are some meaningful quotes in Greek concerning the phenomenon of life:   

  • Greek: Γίνε εσύ η αλλαγή που θες να δεις στον κόσμο.
  • Romanization: Yíne esí i alayí pu thes na dis ston kósmo.
  • Translation: “Be the change you want to see in the world.”
  • Greek: Η ευτυχία δεν είναι κάτι που παίρνουμε έτοιμο. Έρχεται μέσα από τις δικές μας πράξεις.
  • Romanization: Ι eftihía den íne káti pu pérnume étimo. Érhete mésa apó tis dikés mas práxis.
  • Translation: “Happiness is not something ready-made. It comes from your own actions.”
  • Greek: Δεν έχει σημασία το πόσο αργά προχωράς, αρκεί να μη σταματήσεις.
  • Romanization: Den éhi simasía to póso argá prohorás, arkí na mi stamatísis.
  • Translation: “It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop.”

If you need another dose of motivation, check out our full vocabulary list on the Top 10 Inspirational Quotes in Greek!

3. Quotes About Time

A Clock Showing Ten O’clock

Time passes by…even while you’re reading this blog post! Moments are gone forever and become precious memories. 

Below, you can find some of the most popular quotes about time in Greek:

  • Greek: Μην αφήνετε να περνά ο χρόνος χωρίς να βιώνετε τις στιγμές.
  • Romanization: Min afínete na perná o hrónos horís na viónete tis stigmés.
  • Translation: “Don’t let time pass by without living the moments.”
  • Greek: Μια αστραπή η ζωή μας, μα προλαβαίνουμε.
  • Romanization: Mia astrapí i zoí mas, ma prolavénume.
  • Translation: “Our life is (like) lightning, but we’re catching up.”
  • Greek: Το πρόβλημα είναι ότι νομίζετε πως έχετε χρόνο.
  • Romanization: To próvlima íne óti nomízete pos éhete hróno.
  • Translation: “The problem is that you think you have time.”

4. Quotes About Love

Four People Making a Heart Sign with Their Hands in the Air

Oh love… What’s more beautiful in this life than love?

Greek culture is purely based on loving each other: your family, your friends, your partners, and even your acquaintances. 

Here are some popular quotes about love in Greek:

  • Greek: Το να αγαπάς δεν είναι τίποτα. Το να σε αγαπούν είναι κάτι. Αλλά το να αγαπάς και να σε αγαπούν είναι τα πάντα.
  • Romanization: To na agapás den íne típota. To na se agapún íne káti. Alá to na agapás ke na se agapún íne ta pánda.
  • Translation: “To love is nothing. To be loved is something. But to love and be loved is everything.”
  • Greek: Είμαι πιο πολύ ο εαυτός μου όταν είμαι μαζί σου.
  • Romanization: Íme pio polí o eaftós mu ótan íme mazí su.
  • Translation: “I’m much more me when I’m with you.”
  • Greek: Σ’ ευχαριστώ που πάντα είσαι το ουράνιο τόξο μου μετά την καταιγίδα.
  • Romanization: S’ efharistó pu pánda íse to uránio tóxo mu metá tin kateyída.
  • Translation: “Thank you for always being my rainbow after the storm.”

Are you craving more romantic quotes in Greek? We thought so! GreekPod101 has you covered with our vocabulary list of Quotes About Love.

5. Quotes About Family

A Family of Four at the Supermarket

Greek family values are very strong. As such, many elements of Greek culture, ethics, and tradition are passed on from generation to generation. Within the same context, social life revolves around the family and the extended family. We could say that family is the core of Greek society.

Here are some popular quotes about family in Greek:

  • Greek: Η οικογένειά μου είναι η δύναμή μου και η αδυναμία μου.
  • Romanization: I ikoyéniá mu íne i dínamí mu ke i adinamía mu.
  • Translation: “My family is my strength and my weakness.”
  • Greek: Πρέπει να υπερασπίζεσαι την τιμή σου. Και την οικογένειά σου.
  • Romanization: Prépi na iperaspízese tin timí su. Ke tin ikoyéniá su.
  • Translation: “You have to defend your honor. And your family.”
  • Greek: Η οικογένεια είναι ένα από τα αριστουργήματα της φύσης.
  • Romanization: I ikoyénia íne éna apó ta aristuryímata tis físis.
  • Translation: “The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.”

Read through more quotes on our Top 10 Quotes About Family in Greek vocabulary list, and while you’re at it, learn the Must-Know Terms for Family Members.

6. Quotes About Friendship

A Group of Friends Having Fun

Friends are the family we choose. They play an invaluable role throughout our entire life. They hear our thoughts and offer us a brand-new perspective for every situation.

Below are some quotes about friendship in Greek that touch on this:

  • Greek: Το μεγαλύτερο δώρο της ζωής είναι η φιλία, και το έχω λάβει.
  • Romanization: To megalítero dóro tis zoís íne i filía ke to ého lávi.
  • Translation: “The greatest gift of life is friendship, and I have received it.”
  • Greek: Οι φίλοι δείχνουν την αγάπη τους στους δύσκολους καιρούς, όχι στην ευτυχία.
  • Romanization: I fíli díhnun tin agápi tus stus dískolus kerús, óhi stin eftihía.
  • Translation: “Friends show their love in times of trouble, not in happiness.”
  • Greek: Φίλος είναι κάποιος που σου δίνει πλήρη ελευθερία να είσαι ο εαυτός σου.
  • Romanization: Fílos íne kápios pu su díni plíri elefthería na íse o eaftós su.
  • Translation: “A friend is someone who gives you total freedom to be yourself.”

Also study our Top 10 Quotes About Friendship in Greek vocabulary list, and express your gratitude to your Greek friends! 

7. Quotes About Food

A Variety of Different Foods

We’re sure that you’ve at least heard of Greek cuisine. Some of you might have even tasted some Greek specialties in a taverna by the sea. Cooking is an integral part of Greek culture, so you’ll often hear people talking about food and exchanging recipes.

Let’s take a look at some quotes about food in Greek:

  • Greek: Η μαγειρική είναι ένα είδος ψυχοθεραπείας.
  • Romanization: I mayirikí íne éna ídos psihotherapíasi.
  • Translation: “Cooking is a form of psychotherapy.”
  • Greek: Το πρωινό είναι το σημαντικότερο γεύμα της ημέρας.
  • Romanization: To proinó íne to simadikótero yévma tis iméras.
  • Translation: “Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.”
  • Greek: Μια ισορροπημένη διατροφή μπορεί να προσφέρει πολλά οφέλη για την υγεία.
  • Romanization: Mia isoropiméni diatrofí borí na prosféri pollá oféli ya tin iyía.
  • Translation: “A balanced diet can offer plenty of benefits for the health.”

Interested in learning more about Greek cuisine? Visit our vocabulary lists on the most popular Greek foods and the top 10 foods to help you live longer

8. Quotes About Health

A Doctor and a Patient During a Medical Consultation

The ancient Greek physician Hippocrates is thought of as the Father of Modern Medicine. We can say that Greeks value health above any other commodity in life. 

It’s not a coincidence, after all, that in Greek we say Γεια σου! (Ya su!) to say Hello! This word stems from υγεία (iyía), meaning health. So, every time you greet someone, you wish for them to be healthy at the same time!

Since Hippocrates’s time, medicine has flourished, leading to more and more people perceiving health as the ultimate commodity. Therefore, talking about health is part of our everyday lives.

Let’s take a look at some quotes about health in Greek:

  • Greek: Όποιος έχει υγεία μπορεί να έχει δύναμη και ελπίδα. Και όποιος έχει αυτά, έχει τα πάντα.
  • Romanization: Ópios éhi iyía borí na éhi dínami ke elpída. Ke ópios éhi aftá, éhi ta pánda.
  • Translation: “Whoever has health may have strength and hope. And whoever has those, has everything.”
  • Greek: Το γέλιο κάνει καλό στην υγεία.
  • Romanization: To yélio káni kaló stin iyía.
  • Translation: “Laughter is good for the health.”
  • Greek: Αποφάσισα να είμαι ευτυχισμένος επειδή κάνει καλό στην υγεία.
  • Romanization: Apofásisa na íme eftihisménos epidí káni kaló stin iyía.
  • Translation: “I’ve decided to be happy because it is good for my health.”

9. Quotes About Language Learning

A Woman Studying and Thinking about What to Write

Did you know that more than half of Greeks speak English? Indeed, language learning is integrated within the Greek educational system, with many people learning other languages as well, including German, French, Italian, and Spanish. 

What better way to motivate you in your own language studies than to close our article with quotes about language learning in Greek?

  • Greek: Μια νέα γλώσσα είναι μια νέα ζωή.
  • Romanization: Mia néa glósa íne mia néa zoí.
  • Translation: “A new language is a new life.”
  • Greek: Τα όρια της γλώσσας μου είναι τα όρια του κόσμου μου.
  • Romanization: Ta ória tis glósas mu íne ta ória tu kósmu mu.
  • Translation: “The limits of my language are the limits of my world.”
  • Greek: Δεν θα μπορείς να καταλάβεις ποτέ μία γλώσσα, αν δεν καταλαβαίνεις τουλάχιστον δύο.
  • Romanization: Den tha borís na katalávis poté mía glósa, an den katalavénis tuláhiston dío.
  • Translation: “You can never understand one language until you understand at least two.”

If you’re interested in learning more, check out our vocabulary list on Language Learning Quotes.

10. Conclusion

In this blog post, we tried to present in Greek some of the most popular quotes and sayings. By studying them, you’ll gain more fluency and be able to understand the Greek language to a greater extent.

Have you heard of any other quote in Greek that we didn’t include above?

Please let us know in the comments; we always love hearing from you!

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