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Archive for the 'Greek Language' Category

Greek Words for Traveling and Greek Phrases for Tourists

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Greece is a popular destination for summer vacations. People from all over the world come to Greece to experience the history, the culture, the sun, and the scenic islands. Therefore, Greece has a long tradition in the tourism industry; if you ever decide to visit, it won’t be difficult to communicate, since most people here speak English fluently. However, a trip to Greece could be an exceptional opportunity to practice your Greek and feel a little bit closer to the locals.

In this article, GreekPod101.com has gathered the most common phrases you might need while visiting Greece. Regardless of your Greek knowledge level, this blog post will provide you with a wide variety of ready-to-use and useful Greek phrases for travel.

So let’s get on with it and learn Greek phrases for travel!

Table of Contents

  1. Basic Greek Travel Phrases
  2. Transportation
  3. Shopping
  4. Restaurants
  5. Directions
  6. Emergencies
  7. Flattery Phrases
  8. Language Problems
  9. Conclusion

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1. Basic Greek Travel Phrases

Preparing to Travel

Let’s begin with some basic Greek phrases for travel you might need. The usage of the following phrases is exactly the same as their translation in English. Generally, Greeks are fascinated when someone tries to communicate in their language, and usually chat along with a big smile. So, don’t hesitate; go on and use some of the basic expressions listed below.

1- Ευχαριστώ. / Παρακαλώ.

  • Greek: Ευχαριστώ. / Παρακαλώ.
  • Romanization: Efharistó. / Parakaló.
  • Meaning: “Thank you.” / “You’re welcome.”

Example

  • Greek:
    — Ορίστε, τα ρέστα σας.
    — Ευχαριστώ!
    — Παρακαλώ!
  • Romanization:
    Oríste, ta résta sas.
    Efharistó!
    Parakaló!
  • Meaning:
    — “Here is your change.”
    — “Thank you!”
    — “You’re welcome!”

2- Συγγνώμη.

  • Greek: Συγγνώμη.
    Romanization: Signómi.
    Meaning: “I’m sorry.”

Example

  • Greek:
    — Συγγνώμη που άργησα.
    — Όλα καλά. Δεν πειράζει.
  • Romanization:
    Signómi pu áryisa.
    Óla kalá. Den pirázi.
  • Meaning:
    — “I’m sorry for being late.”
    — “Everything’s fine. It doesn’t matter.”

3- Ναι. / Όχι.

  • Greek: Ναι. / Όχι.
  • Romanization: Ne. / Óhi.
  • Meaning: “Yes.” / “No.”

Example

  • Greek:
    — Θα θέλατε επιδόρπιο;
    — Ναι / Όχι. Ευχαριστώ.
  • Romanization:
    Tha thélate epidórpio?
    Ne / Óhi. Efharistó.
  • Meaning:
    — “Would you like some dessert?”
    — “Yes.” / “No. Thank you.”

4- Δεν μιλώ ελληνικά.

  • Greek: Δεν μιλώ ελληνικά.
  • Romanization: De miló elliniká.
  • Meaning: “I don’t speak Greek.”

5- Μου αρέσει. / Δεν μου αρέσει.

  • Greek: Μου αρέσει. / Δεν μου αρέσει.
  • Romanization: Mu arési. / De mu arési.
  • Meaning: “I like it.” / “I don’t like it.”

Do you want to learn some more basic Greek phrases for tourists? Check out our blog post on How to Say Hello in Greek and master your knowledge.


2. Transportation

Airplane Phrases

If you’re visiting Athens, you can use a wide variety of public transportation, ranging from the metro, trains, trolleys, buses, and trams. However, for other parts of the country, buses and taxis might be your only options. Generally, getting around Greece is quite easy in terms of communication, mainly because information is almost always available in English as well.

However, knowing a few of these useful Greek phrases for travel definitely won’t hurt!

1- [Διεύθυνση] παρακαλώ.

  • Greek: [Διεύθυνση] παρακαλώ.
  • Romanization: [Diéfthinsi] parakaló.
  • Meaning: “To [Address] please.”

2- Σε ποια στάση πρέπει να κατέβω;

  • Greek: Σε ποια στάση πρέπει να κατέβω;
  • Romanization: Se pia stási prépi na katévo?
  • Meaning: “In which station should I get off?”

3- Πώς μπορώ να πάω στον/στην/στο….[τοποθεσία];

  • Greek: Πώς μπορώ να πάω στον/στην/στο [τοποθεσία];
  • Romanization: Pós boró na páo sto/stin/sto [topothesía]?
  • Meaning: “How can I get to [location]?”

4- Πού μπορώ να αγοράσω εισιτήριο;

  • Greek: Που μπορώ να αγοράσω εισιτήριο;
  • Romanization: Pu boró na agoráso isitírio?
  • Meaning: “Where can I buy a ticket?”


3. Shopping

Basic Questions

While shopping in Greece, you probably won’t face any problems, as most employees speak English. Nevertheless, this is another opportunity to freshen up your Greek, and no list of Greek words for travelling would be complete without shopping phrases.

Also keep in mind that Greece, as a member of the European Union, uses Euro (€) as currency. Take this opportunity and practice some Greek language travel phrases by using the following:

1- Πόσο κάνει; / Πόσο κοστίζει;

  • Greek: Πόσο κάνει; / Πόσο κοστίζει;
  • Romanization: Póso káni? / Póso kostízi?
  • Meaning: “How much does it cost?”

2- Μπορώ να πληρώσω με κάρτα;

  • Greek: Μπορώ να πληρώσω με κάρτα;
  • Romanization: Boró na pliróso me kárta?
  • Meaning: “Can I pay by card (Debit; Credit)?”

3- Παρακαλώ, μου δίνετε αυτό;

  • Greek: Παρακαλώ, μου δίνετε αυτό;
  • Romanization: Parakaló, mu dínete aftó?
  • Meaning: “Could you give me that, please?”

4- Τι είναι πιο δημοφιλές;

  • Greek: Τι είναι πιο δημοφιλές;
  • Romanization: Ti íne pio dimofilés?
  • Meaning: “What is popular?”

5- Τι μου προτείνετε;

  • Greek: Τι μου προτείνετε;
  • Romanization: Ti mu protínete?
  • Meaning: “What do you recommend?”

Do you want to expand your knowledge? Check out our article on Greek Numbers, which can be quite handy for shopping, when referring to prices.


4. Restaurants

A Man and a Woman at a Restaurant Ordering from a Waiter

Planning on visiting Greece? Great! It’s time to leave behind your ordinary dieting schedule, because in Greece you will eat—a lot! Greek cuisine is part of the Mediterranean cuisine, including lots of vegetables and pure olive oil.

Looking for travel tips in Greece? Greece has a long tradition in food and you should definitely try the specialties of a local taverna.

Ordering in Greek can be a piece of cake by using the following expressions:

1- Μπορώ να δω το μενού, παρακαλώ;

  • Greek: Μπορώ να δω το μενού, παρακαλώ;
  • Romanization: Boró na do to menú, parakaló?
  • Meaning: “Could I see the menu, please?”
  • 2- Αυτό, παρακαλώ.

    • Greek: Αυτό, παρακαλώ. / Ένα νερό, παρακαλώ. / Μία μπίρα, παρακαλώ.
    • Romanization: Aftó, parakaló. / Éna neró, parakaló. / Mía bíra, parakaló.
    • Meaning: “( I would like… ) This, please. / A (bottle of) water, please/ A (can of) beer, please.”

    3- Μπορώ να έχω τον λογαριασμό, παρακαλώ;

    • Greek: Μπορώ να έχω τον λογαριασμό, παρακαλώ;
    • Romanization: Boró na ého ton logariazmó, parakaló?
    • Meaning: “Could I have the check, please?”

    4- Αυτό είναι πολύ νόστιμο.

    • Greek: Αυτό είναι πολύ νόστιμο.
    • Romanization: Aftó íne polí nóstimo.
    • Meaning: “This is very tasty.” / “This is delicious.”

    5- Είμαι χορτοφάγος.

    • Greek: Είμαι χορτοφάγος.
    • Romanization: Íme hortofágos.
    • Meaning: “I am a vegetarian.”


    5. Directions

    A Man Holding a Map Asking for Directions

    Wandering around Greece can become tricky, especially when looking for specific attractions. Greeks are always eager to help you with some directions, so don’t hesitate to ask for anything you need. The essential Greek travel phrases listed below can be used in a wide variety of situations for asking or giving directions.

    1- Πού είναι ο/η/το…;

    • Greek: Πού είναι ο/η/το …..;
    • Romanization: Pu íne o/i/to ….?
    • Meaning: “Where is ….?”

    2- Στρίψτε δεξιά / αριστερά.

    • Greek: Στρίψτε δεξιά / αριστερά.
    • Romanization: Strípste dexiá / aristerá.
    • Meaning: “Turn right / left.”

    3- Πηγαίνετε ευθεία.

    • Greek: Πηγαίνετε ευθεία.
    • Romanization: Piyénete efthía.
    • Meaning: “Go straight ahead.”

    4- Πού είναι η στάση του λεωφορείου / ο σταθμός του τρένου;

    • Greek: Πού είναι η στάση του λεωφορείου / ο σταθμός του τρένου;
    • Romanization: Pu íne i stási tu leoforíu / o stathmós tu trénu?
    • Meaning: “Where is the bus station / the train station?”

    5- Πού είναι η τουαλέτα, παρακαλώ;

    • Greek: Πού είναι η τουαλέτα, παρακαλώ;
    • Romanization: Pu íne i toualéta, parakaló?
    • Meaning: “Where is the toilet, please?”


    6. Emergencies

    Survival Phrases

    You never know when an emergency might take place, so here are some of the most important and relevant Greek expressions you can use in these situations.

    1- Βοήθεια!

    • Greek: Βοήθεια!
    • Romanization: Voíthia!
    • Meaning: “Help!”

    2- Καλέστε ένα ασθενοφόρο!

    • Greek: Καλέστε ένα ασθενοφόρο!
    • Romanization: Kaléste éna asthenofóro!
    • Meaning: “Call an ambulance!”

    3- Υπάρχει κάποιος γιατρός;

    • Greek: Υπάρχει κάποιος γιατρός;
    • Romanization: Ipárhi kápios yatrós?
    • Meaning: “Is there a doctor?”

    4- Καλέστε την αστυνομία!

    • Greek: Καλέστε την αστυνομία!
    • Romanization: Kaléste tin astinomía!
    • Meaning: “Call the police!”

    5- Έχασα το διαβατήριό μου / την ταυτότητά μου.

    • Greek: Έχασα το διαβατήριό μου / την ταυτότητά μου.
    • Romanization: Éhasa to diavatírió mu / tin taftótitá mu.
    • Meaning: “I’ve lost my passport / my ID.”


    7. Flattery Phrases

    A Woman Is Flattered, When Receiving Some Flowers

    Eager to make some new Greek friends? Try some of the flattery phrases below and it’s almost a guarantee that you’ll be able to get to know new people. Of all the travel phrases in Greek, these are the most likely to bring a smile to someone’s face!

    1- Μου αρέσει το ελληνικό φαγητό / η ελληνική κουζίνα.

    • Greek: Μου αρέσει το ελληνικό φαγητό / η ελληνική κουζίνα.
    • Romanization: Mu arési to elinikó fayitó / i elinikí kuzína.
    • Meaning: “I like Greek food / Greek cuisine.”

    2- Αγαπώ την Ελλάδα.

    • Greek: Αγαπώ την Ελλάδα.
    • Romanization: Agapó tin Elláda.
    • Meaning: “I love Greece.”

    3- Είσαι πολύ ευγενικός / ευγενική.

    • Greek: Είσαι πολύ ευγενικός/ ευγενική.
    • Romanization: Íse polí evyenikós [male] / evyenikí [female].
    • Meaning: “You are very kind.”

    4- Θέλεις να πάμε για έναν καφέ;

    • Greek: Θέλεις να πάμε για έναν καφέ;
    • Romanization: Thélis na páme ya énan kafé?
    • Meaning: “Do you want to go out for a coffee?”

    5- Έχεις Facebook / Instagram;

    • Greek: Έχεις Facebook / Instagram;
    • Romanization: Éhis Facebook / Instagram?
    • Meaning: “Do you use Facebook / Instagram?” [Literal translation: “Do you have Facebook / Instagram?”]


    8. Language Problems

    World Map

    Trying to communicate in a foreign country is always a challenge you need to overcome. For this reason, it’s good that you’re practicing travel phrases to learn the Greek language. As mentioned before, most Greek people speak English fluently; however, in some isolated villages, where the true beauty of Greece hides, people might not be able to understand. For instances like this, the following phrases can be a life saver.

    1- Μιλάτε ελληνικά; / Μιλάτε αγγλικά;

    • Greek: Μιλάτε ελληνικά; / Μιλάτε αγγλικά;
    • Romanization: Miláte eliniká? / Miláte angliká?
    • Meaning: “Do you speak Greek?” / “Do you speak English?”

    2- Μπορείτε να το επαναλάβετε αυτό;

    • Greek: Μπορείτε να το επαναλάβετε αυτό;
    • Romanization: Boríte na to epanalávete aftó?
    • Meaning: “Could you repeat that?”

    3- Παρακαλώ μιλήστε αργά. Δεν καταλαβαίνω ελληνικά.

    • Greek: Παρακαλώ μιλήστε αργά. Δεν καταλαβαίνω καλά ελληνικά.
    • Romanization: Parakaló milíste argá. Den katanavéno kalá eliniká.
    • Meaning: “Please speak slowly. I don’t understand Greek well.”

    4- Πώς λέγεται αυτό στα ελληνικά;

    • Greek: Πώς λέγεται αυτό στα ελληνικά;
    • Romanization: Pos léyete aftó sta eliniká?
    • Meaning: “How do you say this in Greek?”

    5- Μπορείτε να το γράψετε;

    • Greek: Μπορείτε να το γράψετε;
    • Romanization: Boríte na to grápsete?
    • Meaning: “Could you write this down?”


    9. Conclusion

    We hope we’ve shown you the importance of travel phrases in Greek language learning, and that you’ve had fun learning these. Communicating in Greek is highly appreciated in Greece and can bring you a step closer to the local community and culture.

    Planning on visiting Greece? Want to learn more about the Greek language?

    GreekPod101.com offers you high-quality, practical knowledge about the Greek language. At GreekPod101.com, we aim to provide you with everything you need to know about the Greek language in a fun and interesting way. Articles like this one, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos are waiting for you to discover them! You can even delve into a one-on-one learning experience with your own personal Greek teacher upon subscription to Premium Plus!

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    Greek Numbers: How to Count in Greek

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    Numbers are all around us. Therefore, learning how to count in Greek will surely come in handy at one point or another. In this article, you’ll learn how to write and pronounce Greek numbers and how you can use them in everyday life with GreekPod101.com.

    Numbers in Greek have changed over the years. The original Greek number system was developed in ancient Greece and included the use of alphabet letters instead of numbers. As centuries passed by, the use of ancient Greek numbers faded away and Greeks started to use the Hindu-Arabic numeral system, which is still used today.

    That said, let’s go on ahead and learn more about numbers in the Greek language, as well as more information about Greek numerals.

    Table of Contents

    1. Greek Numbers 0-9
    2. Greek Numbers 10-99
    3. Greek Numbers up to 1000
    4. Cardinal Numbers in Greek
    5. Ordinal Greek Numbers
    6. Everyday Use of Greek Numbers
    7. Conclusion

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Count to One Billion in Greek


    1. Greek Numbers 0-9

    German Numbers

    The Greek numbers from 0 to 9 are demonstrated below, accompanied by their pronunciation.

    • 0 - μηδέν (midén)
    • 1 - ένα (éna)
    • 2 - δύο (dío)
    • 3 - τρία (tría)
    • 4 - τέσσερα (tésera)
    • 5 - πέντε (pénde)
    • 6 - έξι (éxi)
    • 7 - επτά (eptá)
    • 8 - οκτώ (októ)
    • 9 - εννέα (enéa)

    This is the base of almost all numbers, so make sure you study them thoroughly.

    Do you feel like listening to each number’s pronunciation? Check out our Greek Numbers List.


    2. Greek Numbers 10-99

    Learning how to count in Greek is easy. However, there are a few particularities you should definitely watch out for. Let’s take a look at the numbers from 10-19.

    • 10 - δέκα (déka)
    • 11 - έντεκα (éndeka)
    • 12 - δώδεκα (dódeka)
    • 13 - δεκατρία (dekatría)
    • 14 - δεκατέσσερα (dekatésera)
    • 15 - δεκαπέντε (dekapénde)
    • 16 - δεκαέξι (dekaéxi)
    • 17 - δεκαεπτά (dekaeptá)
    • 18 - δεκαοκτώ (dekaoktó)
    • 19 - δεκαεννέα (dekaenéa)

    All of the above numbers consist of one word, of which the prefix indicates the first digit and the suffix represents the second digit.

    The first difficulty you’ll probably face is learning the numbers 11 or έντεκα (éndeka) and 12 or δώδεκα (dódeka). These are the only two-digit numbers that don’t follow the aforementioned rule.

    When it comes to numbers 20-100, here’s a preview:

    • 20 - είκοσι (íkosi)
    • 21 - είκοσι ένα (íkosi éna)
    • 22 - είκοσι δύο (íkosi dío)
    • 23 - είκοσι τρία (íkosi tría)

    Note a major change at this point. Every number greater than 20 consists of two words. Again, in this case the first word refers to the first digit and the second word indicates the second digit respectively. Another thing you might have noticed is that 21 or είκοσι ένα (íkosi éna) and 22 or είκοσι δύο (íkosi dío) just follow the rule.

    So, what happens for greater numbers? The idea is the same, so each number will consist of two words. The first one will be one of the following, accompanied by a second word which will indicate the second digit 1-9.

    • 20 - είκοσι (íkosi)
    • 30 - τριάντα (triánda)
    • 40 - σαράντα (saránda)
    • 50 - πενήντα (penínda)
    • 60 - εξήντα (eksínda)
    • 70 - εβδομήντα (evdomínda)
    • 80 - ογδόντα (ogdónda)
    • 90 - ενενήντα (enenínda)

    As shown above, the second digit, which is 0 or μηδέν (midén,) isn’t pronounced in Greek, as each of these words has a unique one-word name.


    3. Greek Numbers up to 1000

    Feeling puzzled? Don’t worry, your struggle pretty much ends here!

    For numbers 100-999 the only additional thing you need to learn is how the hundreds are pronounced.

    • 100 - εκατό(ν) (ekató(n))
    • 200 - διακόσια (diakósia)
    • 300 - τριακόσια (triakósia)
    • 400 - τετρακόσια (tetrakósia)
    • 500 - πεντακόσια (pendakósia)
    • 600 - εξακόσια (exakósia)
    • 700 - επτακόσια (eptakósia)
    • 800 - οκτακόσια (oktakósia)
    • 900 - εννιακόσια (eniakósia)
    • 1000 - χίλια (hília)

    So, in the case of three digit numbers, the only thing you need to add is a word indicating the hundreds. All the rest is the same. Please note that only for the number 100 or εκατό (ekató) we omit the final “ν” (n) of the word. For numbers above 100, we include the final “ν” (n).

    • 100 - εκατό (ekató)
    • 101 - εκατόν ένα (ekatón éna)
    • 102 - εκατόν δύο (ekatón dío)
    • 103 - εκατόν τρία (ekatón tría)
    • 104 - εκατόν τέσσερα (ekatón tésera)

    …….

    • 110 - εκατόν δέκα (ekatón déka)
    • 111 - εκατόν έντεκα (ekatón éndeka)
    • 112 - εκατόν δώδεκα (ekatón dódeka)
    • 113 - εκατόν δεκατρία (ekatón dekatría)

    ……..

    • 120 - εκατόν είκοσι ένα (ekatón íkosi éna)
    • 121 - εκατόν είκοσι δύο (ekatón íkosi dío)
    • 123 - εκατόν είκοσι τρία (ekatón íkosi tría)

    ……….


    4. Cardinal Numbers in Greek

    Cardinal numbers are considered adjectives in Greek, so they need to agree in gender, number, and case with the noun they define. So, let’s have a look at the following examples.

     A Small Dog Sitting on Blue Wooden Floor A Kitten Sitting Down and Meowing A Small Bird in White Background

    Masculine Noun

    • Greek: Ένας σκύλος.
    • Romanization: Énas skílos.
    • Meaning: “One dog.”

    Feminine Noun

    • Greek: Mία γάτα.
    • Romanization: Mía gáta.
    • Meaning: “One cat.”

    Neutral Noun

    • Greek: Ένα πουλί.
    • Romanization: Éna pulí.
    • Meaning: “One bird.”

    As you can figure out from the above examples, the number 1 gets inflected according to the gender of the noun it’s referring to. Learn more animals in Greek and their gender in our relevant vocabulary lesson. In addition to number 1, numbers 3 and 4 also get inflected, as shown below, as well as all the numbers that end in those digits (1, 3, 4).

    Masculine Noun

    • Greek: Τρεις/Τέσσερις σκύλοι.
    • Romanization: Tris/Téseris skíli.
    • Meaning: “Three/Four dogs.”

    Feminine Noun

    • Greek: Είκοσι τρεις/Είκοσι τέσσερις γάτες.
    • Romanization: Íkosi tris/Íkosi téseris gátes.
    • Meaning: “Twenty-three/Twenty-four cats.”

    Neutral Noun

    • Greek: Εκατόν τρία/ Εκατόν τέσσερα πουλιά.
    • Romanization: Ekatón tría/ Ekatón tésera puliá.
    • Meaning: “One hundred and three/ One hundred and four birds.”

    The above examples are indicative for phrases that use the numbers in the nominative case. There are more variations when it comes to other cases, and general inflection is a pretty big chapter in Greek grammar. So, if you want to learn more and master your Greek cardinal numbers knowledge, you should watch a video we’ve created especially for this.

    Apart from the numbers that end in the digits 1, 3, and 4, the rest of the numbers up to 1000 have only one form for all genders and cases.


    5. Ordinal Greek Numbers

    Ordinal numbers in Greek are also adjectives. So, for each ordinal number there are three variations, showcasing different endings, depending on whether the referenced noun is masculine, feminine, or neutral.

    For masculine/feminine/neutral nouns:

    • 1st - πρώτος / / -ο (prótos / -i / -o)
    • 2nd - δεύτερος (défteros)
    • 3rd - τρίτος (trítos)
    • 4th - τέταρτος (tétartos)
    • 5th - πέμπτος (pémptos)
    • 6th - έκτος (éktos)
    • 7th - έβδομος (évdomos)
    • 8th - όγδοος (ógdoos)
    • 9th - ένατος (énatos)
    • 10th - δέκατος (dékatos)
    • 11th - ενδέκατος (endékatos)
    • 12th - δωδέκατος (dodékatos)
    • 13th - δέκατος τρίτος (dékatos trítos)
    • 14th - δέκατος τέταρτος (dékatos tétartos)

    ……..

    • 20th - εικοστός (ekatostós)
    • 21st - εικοστός πρώτος (ekatostós prótos)
    • 22nd - εικοστός δεύτερος (ekatostós défteros)

    ……

    • 30th - τριακοστός (triakostós)
    • 40th - τεσσαρακοστός (tesarakostós)
    • 50th - πεντηκοστός (pendikostós)
    • 60th - εξηκοστός (exikostós)
    • 70th - εβδομηκοστός (evdomikostós)
    • 80th - ογδοηκοστός (ogdoikostós)
    • 90th - ενενηκοστός (enenikostós)
    • 100th - εκατοστός (ekatostós)

    …….

    Ordinal numbers show the order of an individual or an item. Let’s have a closer look with an example, shall we?

    One Woman and Two Men in Suits Running and Competing in a Race

    • Greek: Στον αγώνα τρεξίματος ο Γιώργος τερμάτισε πρώτος, η Μαρία δεύτερη και ο Δημήτρης τρίτος.
    • Romanization: Ston agóna trexímatos o Yórgos termátise prótos, i María défteri ke o Dimítris trítos.
    • Meaning: “In the running race, George crossed the finish line first, Maria was second, and Dimitris was third.”

    See how the ordinal numbers get inflected? The same goes for all the other Greek ordinal numbers.

    If you want even more information on Greek numbers, our YouTube channel has some great videos for you to watch and learn with!


    6. Everyday Use of Greek Numbers

    1- How to Give Your Phone Number in Greek

    Giving your phone number in Greek is pretty simple. You just have to say one digit at a time.

    Blonde Woman in Yellow Shirt Smiling and Talking on the Mobile Phone.

    • Greek: Το τηλέφωνό μου είναι: εννέα, οκτώ, επτά, ένα, δύο, τρία, τέσσερα, πέντε, έξι (987123456).
    • Romanization: To tiléfonó mu íne: enéa, októ, eptá, éna, dío, tría, tésera, pénde, éxi.
    • Meaning: “My phone number is: nine, eight, seven, one, two, three, four, five, six (987123456).”

    Greeks, however, tend to say their phone number in a wide variety of ways in oral speech. So, understanding or writing down someone’s number might be quite a challenge. They usually say their number informally the way they remember it and in groups.

    For example, someone might say ενενήντα οκτώ (enenída októ) meaning “ninety eight,” instead of εννέα, οκτώ (enéa, októ) which would be “nine, eight.” In this case, you can politely ask for a one-by-one digit version like this:

    • Greek: Μπορείτε να μου πείτε τα νούμερα ένα ένα;
    • Romanization: Boríte na mu píte ta númera éna éna?
    • Meaning: “Can you tell me the numbers one by one?”

    2- How to Say Prices in Greek

    Greece, as a member of the European Union, uses Euro as its currency. All prices in shops are indicated with numerical digits, so you probably won’t face any problems. Moreover, the prices are pronounced as simple numbers, as shown in the example below.

    Blonde Woman Staring at a Price Tag of a Blue Dress.

    • Greek: Αυτό το φόρεμα κοστίζει τριάντα πέντε (35) ευρώ.
    • Romanization: Aftó to fórema kostízi triánda pénde evró.
    • Meaning: “This dress costs thirty-five euros.”

    Do you want to ask for a price? We’ve got you covered, just take a look at the following example.

    • Greek: Πόσο κάνει/κοστίζει αυτό;
    • Romanization: Póso káni/kostízi aftó?
    • Meaning: “How much does this cost?”

    You can either say κάνει (káni) or κοστίζει (kostízi) and this phrase can be used for any item regardless of its gender. Just point at the item you’re interested in and ask.


    7. Conclusion

    Learning Greek numbers can be a real challenge for a total beginner. But that’s why we’re here! Start learning Greek today in a consistent and organized manner by creating a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com. Tons of free vocabulary lists, YouTube videos, and grammar tips are waiting for you to discover.

    In the meantime, keep in mind that Greek numbers in language learning are of great importance, so keep up the good work!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Count to One Billion in Greek

    How To Post In Perfect Greek on Social Media

    Thumbnail

    You’re learning to speak Greek, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Greek.

    At Learn Greek, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Greek in the process.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek

    1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Greek

    Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Greek. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

    Sotíris eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of of the food, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sotíris’s post.

    Μπουκιά και συχώριο! (Bukiá ke sihório!)
    “To die for!”

    1- μπουκιά και συχώριο (bukiá ke sihório)

    This is an idiomatic expression that literally means “mouthful and forgiveness.” You can use it in situations where you are eating food that is absolutely delicious. The true meaning behind this idiom is that the cook did such a good job that, with every bite, his or her sins should be forgiven.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sotíris’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Τι κρίμα, ήθελα να πάω κι εγώ! (Ti kríma, íthela na páo ki egó!)

    His friend, Dímitra, makes a comment meaning - “What a shame, I wanted to go too!”
    Dímitra is disappointed that she was not invited to go with.

    2- Αυτά είναι! (Aftá íne!)

    His college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “This is it!”
    Mihális shares his friend’s enthusiasm over the delicious food.

    3- Ωραίες γκουρμεδιές… (Orées gurmediés̷ ;)

    Dimitra’s nephew, Míltos, makes a comment meaning - “Nice gourmet stuff…”
    This slang expression shows you think the food is gourmet standard.

    4- Θέλω κι εγώ! (Thélo ki egó!)

    His high school friend, Hristína, makes a comment meaning - “I want it too!”
    Use this sentence to show you want to do what the others are doing.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • μπουκιά (bukiá): “mouthful, bite”
  • συχώριο (sihório): “forgiveness (specially of sins, colloquial)”
  • τι (ti): “what (a)”
  • κρίμα (kríma): “shame, pity, bummer, sorrow”
  • πηγαίνω (piyéno): “to go, to leave, to match”
  • ωραίος (oréos): “nice, beautiful, handsome”
  • γκουρμεδιά (gurmediá): “gourmet food (slang)”
  • θέλω (thélo): “to want”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Greek restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Going Out Shopping

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Greek phrases in posts when you go out shopping.

    Dímitra shop with her sister at the mall, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Dímitra’s post.

    Για ψώνια με την καλύτερη παρέα! (Ya psónia me tin kalíteri paréa!)
    “Shopping with the best company!”

    1- για ψώνια (ya psónia)

    First is a phrase meaning “shopping.”
    Although this phrase is short and has no verb, it is implied that you have gone shopping or that you are shopping right now. You can also replace the word ψώνια with some other noun. For example, if you used φαγητό, meaning “food”, you would be telling your friends on social media that you have gone for lunch or dinner somewhere.

    2- με την καλύτερη παρέα (me tin kalíteri paréa)

    Then comes the phrase - “with the best company.”
    You can use this phrase as is in many situations to show that you are with people who you have a good time with. Keep in mind that this doesn’t necessarily imply friendship.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Dímitra’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Είστε και οι δύο κούκλες! (Íste ke i dío kúkles!)

    Her neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “You both look gorgeous!”
    Use this sentence to compliment two women or girls on their looks.

    2- Πήρες τελικά αυτό που ήθελες; (Píres teliká aftó pu ítheles?)

    Her high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “Did you eventually get what you wanted?”
    Use this sentence to tease someone when you think they got carried away with shopping.

    3- Σέλφι! (Sélfi!)

    Her friend, Sotíris, makes a comment meaning - “Selfie!”
    Use this expression when you want someone to post selfies, or to talk about selfies.

    4- Σέλφι χωρίς ντακ φέις; Πάει, χάλασες εσύ! (Sélfi horís dak féis? Pái, hálases esí!)

    Her college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Selfie without a duck face? There must be something wrong with you!”
    Use these sentences when you feel like being sarcastic in this context.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ψώνια (psónia): “shopping”
  • καλύτερος (kalíteros): “better, best”
  • παρέα (paréa): “company, group of friends, party”
  • κούκλα (kúkla): “doll, beautiful woman (figuratively)”
  • τελικά (teliká): “finally, in the end, eventually”
  • σέλφι (sélfi): “selfie”
  • ντακ φέις (dak féis): “duck face”
  • χαλάω (haláo): “to go bad, to spoil, to ruin”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Greek

    Sports events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Greek.

    Sotíris plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sotíris’s post.

    Πετάει η ομάδα! (Petái i omáda!)
    “The team rocks!”

    1- πετάει (petái)

    First is a verb meaning “rocks”, which is a metaphor.
    Although this verb form literally means “flies” in the third person singular, what it actually means in this context is that the team is winning by a great difference.

    2- η ομάδα (i omáda)

    Then comes the noun - “the team.”
    You can use this noun in many contexts, as it doesn’t have to involve sports. For example, you could post a picture of you and your colleagues or you and a group of people that you share a certain activity with and use “Η ομάδα.” as the caption.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sotíris’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Παιδιά, να μαζευτούμε να ξαναπάμε! (Pediá, na mazeftúme na xanapáme!)

    His high school friend, Hristína, makes a comment meaning - “Guys, we should get (back) together and go there again!”
    Use this sentence to show you are keen on seeing a group of people again.

    2- Ποιος κέρδισε; (Pios kérdise?)

    His Dimitra’s nephew, Míltos, makes a comment meaning - “Who won?”
    Use this question when asking about the result of a game, competition, elections etc.

    3- Ανέβασε και τις υπόλοιπες φωτογραφίες! (Anévase ke tis ipólipes fotografíes!)

    His college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Upload the rest of the pictures too!”
    Use this sentence to ask people to upload pictures on social media.

    4- Εγώ θα ανεβάσω τις δικές μου αύριο όταν θα έχω χρόνο. (Egó tha aneváso tis dikés mu ávrio ótan tha ého hróno.)

    His neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “I’ll upload mine tomorrow when I have some time.”
    Use this sentence to explain that you are busy.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • πετάω (petáo): “to fly, to throw”
  • ομάδα (omáda): “team, group, type (for blood)”
  • μαζεύομαι (mazévome): “to get together, to gather, to crouch, to shrink, to be collected”
  • ξαναπηγαίνω (xanapiyéno): “to go again”
  • κερδίζω (kerdízo): “to win, to earn, to defeat”
  • ανεβάζω (anevázo): “to upload, to raise, to elevate”
  • φωτογραφία (fotografía): “photo, photography”
  • χρόνος (hrónos): “time, year”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Greek

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Dímitra shares a song she just heard at a party, posts a video of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Dímitra’s post.

    Ένα βίντεο για να φτιάξει η διάθεση. Καλημέρες! (Éna vídeo ya na ftiáxi i diáthesi. Kaliméres!)
    “A video to get into the mood. Good morning! ”

    1- ένα βίντεο για να φτιάξει η διάθεση (éna vídeo ya na ftiáxi i diáthesi)

    First is a phrase meaning “a video to get into the mood.”
    In Greek, when you want to go from a bad mood to a good mood, we literally say “to fix the mood.” For that, we use the verb φτιάχνω, “to make”, in the third person singular form of the subjunctive, which is να φτιάξει, meaning “to make/fix”. However, the use of this phrase is impersonal because no one really “makes” your mood. Your mood simply becomes better by no one in particular.

    2- καλημέρες (kaliméres)

    Then comes the expression - “good morning.”
    Recently on Greek social media it is very common to see the word for “good morning” in the plural (καλημέρες) instead of the singular (καλημέρα), which is the usual way to say it. For Greeks, καλημέρα can be used as either an interjection or as a noun (η καλημέρα). As a noun, it has a plural form (οι καλημέρες). In that sense, posting the plural form καλημέρες on social media means that you are sending a “good morning” to everyone. So, basically you’re sending many “good mornings!” all at once.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Dímitra’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ο τύπος στο βιντεοκλίπ είναι φοβερός! (O típos sto videoklíp íne foverós!)

    Her neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “The guy in the video clip is awesome!”
    Use this sentence to give a compliment to someone.

    2- Τι κάνει ο άνθρωπος;! (Ti káni o ánthropos?!)

    Her high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “The things this man can do!”
    Use this expression when you want to comment on someone’s extraordinary skills.

    3- Απίστευτο βιντεοκλίπ! (Apístefto videoklíp!)

    Her college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Amazing music video!”
    Use this sentence to show you are impressed.

    4- Καλημέρα! (Kaliméra!)

    Her friend, Sotíris, makes a comment meaning - “Good morning!”
    Use this expression to greet people in the morning hours and until noon.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • διάθεση (diáthesi): “mood, temper, disposition”
  • καλημέρα (kaliméra): “good morning”
  • τύπος (típos): “guy, dude, type”
  • φοβερός (foverós): “awesome, terrific, terrifying, terrible”
  • κάνω (káno): “to do, to make”
  • άνθρωπος (ánthropos): “human, man”
  • απίστευτος (apísteftos): “unbelievable, incredible, amazing”
  • βιντεοκλίπ (videoklíp): “music video”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Greek Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Greek!

    Sotíris goes to a concert, posts an image of the event, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sotíris’s post.

    Συμβαίνει τώρα. (Simvéni tóra.)
    “Happening now.”

    1- συμβαίνει τώρα (simvéni tóra)

    Use this phrase when posting pictures online that show your friends or followers what you are doing at that very moment. The verb συμβαίνει is in the third person, which translated means “it’s happening.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sotíris’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Δώσε… (Dóse̷ ;)

    His college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Give it all! ”
    Use this slang expression when listening to a song you like, especially a live song, to show that you want the artist to keep going.

    2- Καλά να περάσεις! (Kalá na perásis!)

    His neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “Have a good time!”
    Use this expression to wish others a good time.

    3- Μακάρι να ήμουν εκεί! (Makári na ímun ekí!)

    His high school friend, Hristína, makes a comment meaning - “I wish I were there!”
    Use this sentence to show you are a bit sad you couldn’t make it to a certain event.

    4- Κωλόφαρδε! Εγώ δεν βρήκα εισιτήρια… (Kolófarde! Egó den vríka isitíria̷ ;)

    Dimitra’s nephew, Míltos, makes a comment meaning - “You lucky guy! I didn’t find tickets…”
    Use these sentences to show you are a bit jealous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • συμβαίνω (simvéno): “to happen, to occur, to take place”
  • τώρα (tóra): “now”
  • δίνω (díno): “to give”
  • περνάω (pernáo): “to spend (time), to pass, to come”
  • μακάρι (makári): “I wish, if only (no equivalent in English)”
  • κωλόφαρδος (kolófardos): “very lucky (colloquial)”
  • βρίσκω (vrísko): “to find”
  • εισιτήριο (isitírio): “ticket”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert, which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Greek

    Oh dear! You smashed your mobile phone by accident. Use these Greek phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Dímitra accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Dímitra’s post.

    Φρίκη! Δεν το πιστεύω αυτό που έπαθα… (Fríki! Den to pistévo aftó pu épatha̷ ;)
    “Terrible! I can’t believe what happened to me…”

    1- φρίκη (fríki)

    First is an expression meaning “terrible.”
    This is a noun that typically means “horror.” However, it can be used as an interjection, like in this lesson, when something really bad happens. In this case, it means “horrible” or “terrible.”

    2- δεν το πιστεύω αυτό που έπαθα (den to pistévo aftó pu épatha)

    Then comes the phrase - “I can’t believe what happened to me.”
    You can use δεν το πιστεύω, which means “I can’t believe it”, to express your surprise about something that just happened or something you suddenly found out. It can be used for both good and bad situations, just like its English equivalent.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Dímitra’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Περαστικά… (Perastiká̷ ;)

    Her friend, Sotíris, makes a comment meaning - “Get well soon…”
    Use this expression literally when someone is sick, or when you want the other person to recover from misfortune.

    2- Όταν τα παλιά τα κινητά πέφτανε, δεν παθαίνανε τίποτα. (Ótan ta paliá ta kinitá péftane, den pathénane típota.)

    Her supervisor, Dionísis, makes a comment meaning - “When the old mobiles would fall, nothing would happen to them.”
    Use this sentence if you are a bit old fashioned when it comes to technology.

    3- Καλά, εσύ το διέλυσες! (Kalá, esí to diélises!)

    Her high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “Gosh, you smashed it!”
    Use this sentence to be funny.

    4- Αν θες, μπορώ να σου δανείσω την παλιά μου συσκευή. (An thes, boró na su daníso tin paliá mu siskeví.)

    Her neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “If you want, I can lend you my old device.”
    Use this sentence to show you want to help.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • φρίκη (fríki): “horror, horrible/terrible (as an interjection)”
  • πιστεύω (pistévo): “to believe, to think, to reckon”
  • που (pu): “that”
  • περαστικά (perastiká): “get well soon (no equivalent in English)”
  • παλιός (paliós): “old”
  • παθαίνω (pathéno): “to happen to, to suffer”
  • διαλύω (dialío): “to dissolve, to smash, to break apart”
  • δανείζω (danízo): “to lend”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to describe an accident in Greek. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Greek

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Greek!

    Sotíris gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sotíris’s post.

    Η απόλυτη βαρεμάρα σήμερα λέμε. (I apóliti varemára símera léme.)
    “Talk about absolute boredom today.”

    1- η απόλυτη βαρεμάρα σήμερα (i apóliti varemára símera)

    First is a phrase meaning “absolute boredom today.”
    This is one of those phrases that doesn’t need a verb to make sense. You can use this phrase as is when you are utterly bored and want attention, which usually works, as it will trigger comments.

    2- λέμε (léme)

    Then comes the verb expression - “talk about.”
    This verb form literally means “we talk” or “we are talking.” However, here it is used in a non-literal way. You can say λέμε directly before or after a statement to emphasize what you just mentioned. This will make your speech sound slangy, so don’t use it in formal situations.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sotíris’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Θες να κάνουμε κάτι πιο μετά; (Thes na kánume káti pio metá?)

    His friend, Dímitra, makes a comment meaning - “Do you want to do something later?”
    Use this sentence to show you want to hang out with someone.

    2- Άκου τη Δήμητρα! Όλο και κάποια καλή ιδέα θα έχει. (Áku ti Dímitra! Ólo ke kápia kalí idéa tha éhi.)

    His neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “Listen to Demetra! She must have some good idea.”
    She uses this sentence as a pun to get the two of them together.

    3- Φίλε, ξεκόλλα! (Fíle, xekóla!)

    His college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Dude, snap out of it!”
    Use this sentence when someone is feeling bad or sad without a serious reason.

    4- Το ‘χει η μέρα… (To ‘hi i méra̷ ;)

    Dimitra’s nephew, Míltos, makes a comment meaning - “It’s one of those days…”
    Use this expression on days when everything seems to be going wrong.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • απόλυτος (apólitos): “absolute”
  • βαρεμάρα (varemára): “boredom”
  • σήμερα (símera): “today”
  • κάτι (káti): “something”
  • πιο μετά (pio metá): “later”
  • ακούω (akúo): “to hear, to listen”
  • κάποιος (kápios): “some, somebody, someone”
  • ξεκολλάω (xekoláo): “to come off, to become detached, to snap out of (figuratively)”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Greek

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Greek about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Dímitra feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Dímitra’s post.

    Είμαι ΠΤΩΜΑ! (Íme PTOMA!)
    “I’m DEAD!”

    1- είμαι πτώμα (íme ptóma)

    Obviously this phrase is used metaphorically to mean that you are exhausted. So use it when you are feeling tired and fatigued.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Dímitra’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Καλή ξεκούραση. (Kalí xekúrasi.)

    Her supervisor, Dionísis, makes a comment meaning - “Have a good rest.”
    Use this sentence structure to wish someone something.

    2- Ώχου το! Ξεκουράσου σήμερα και θα περάσω να σε δω αύριο. (Óhu to! Xekurásu símera ke tha peráso na se do ávrio.)

    Her friend, Sotíris, makes a comment meaning - “Aw! Rest today and I’ll pass by to see you tomorrow.”
    Use these sentences to show affection and that you care about their predicament.

    3- Σωτήρη, Δήμητρα, τι τρέχει με εσάς τους δύο; (Sotíri, Dímitra, ti tréhi me esás tus dío?)

    Her neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “Sotiri, Demetra, what’s the deal with the two of you?”
    Use this sentence to show you are being suspicious that there might be more than friendship between two people. Or you could use this to tease them, if you know they’re just friends!

    4- Όπα! Τι έγινε βρε παιδιά; (!) (Ópa! Ti éyine vre pediá? (!))

    Her high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment using a famous line from a popular old Greek TV series meaning - “Whoa! What’s going on, you guys? (!)”
    Use this line if you want to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • πτώμα (ptóma): “dead body, corpse, exhausted (figuratively)”
  • ξεκούραση (xekúrasi): “rest, repose”
  • ώχου (óhu): “aw (cute), ah (annoyance)”
  • ξεκουράζομαι (xekurázome): “to rest, to repose”
  • βλέπω (vlépo): “to see, to watch”
  • τρέχω (trého): “to run, to execute (computer)”
  • δύο (dío): “two”
  • όπα (ópa): “whoa (no equivalent in English)”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Greek! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Greek

    So life happens, and you manage to have sport injuries. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Greek.

    Sotíris get diagnosed with tendonitis, posts an image of his knee, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sotíris’s post.

    Τενοντίτιδα… καταπληκτικά… (Tenondítida… katapliktiká̷ ;)
    “Tendonitis… great…”

    1- τενοντίτιδα (tenondítida)

    First is a noun meaning “tendonitis.”
    If you want to post about a sickness or injury you have, then all you need to do is post its name. This will make it clear to everyone that you have it.

    2- καταπληκτικά (katapliktiká)

    Then comes the adverb - “great.”
    Although the meaning of this adverb has a positive connotation, you can use it in an ironic way to express the opposite. It’s similar to English where you say “just great” when something bad happens.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sotíris’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Μιλάς σοβαρά; (Milás sovará?)

    His friend, Dímitra, makes a comment meaning - “Are you serious?”
    Use this sentence to show you are surprised.

    2- Να προσέχεις, μην το ζορίζεις το γόνατό σου. (Na proséhis, min to zorízis to gónató su.)

    His supervisor, Dionísis, makes a comment meaning - “Take care of yourself. Don’t strain your knee.”
    Use this sentence to show empathy.

    3- Το είχα πάθει κι εγώ απ’ τον χορό. Περαστικά. (To íha páthi ki egó ap’ ton horó. Perastiká.)

    His high school friend, Hristína, makes a comment meaning - “It happened to me too from dancing. Get well.”
    Use these sentences to show the poster you know what they are going through.

    4- Σε βλέπω αγκαλιά με τα παυσίπονα για λίγο καιρό. (Se vlépo angaliá me ta pafsípona ya lígo keró.)

    His college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “I see you’ll be attached to painkillers for a while.”
    Use this sentence if you want to talk with a humorous tone.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • τενοντίτιδα (tenondítida): “tendonitis”
  • καταπληκτικά (katapliktiká): “amazing(ly), awesome(ly), great”
  • σοβαρά (sovará): “seriously, severely, really”
  • προσέχω (prosého): “to take care, to watch over, to be careful, to pay attention”
  • ζορίζω (zorízo): “to strain, to pressure, to force”
  • γόνατο (gónato): “knee”
  • χορός (horós): “dance”
  • αγκαλιά (angaliá): “hug”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Greek

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Dímitra feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Dímitra’s post.

    Γκαντεμιά! Μας τα χάλασε σήμερα ο καιρός. (Gademiá! Mas ta hálase símera o kerós.)
    “Shoot! The weather messed up everything today.”

    1- γκαντεμιά (gademiá)

    First is a noun expression meaning “shoot.”
    This noun literally translates as “misfortune.” It can be used as a noun (η γκαντεμιά) or as an interjection, like in this lesson. In this case, you understand that “shoot” is similar to “Shoot!” in English.

    2- μας τα χάλασε σήμερα ο καιρός (mas ta hálase símera o kerós)

    Then comes the phrase - “the weather messed up everything today.”
    If we translate this phrase word for word, it would mean something like “the weather today ruined them for us.” “Them”, in this case, would be their plans. You can replace ο καιρός with another word or the name of a person who ruins your plans.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Dímitra’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Εμένα πάλι μου αρέσει πολύ αυτός ο καιρός. (Eména páli mu arési polí aftós o kerós.)

    Her neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “Well, I actually like this weather a lot.”
    Use this sentence structure to express an opposite opinion.

    2- Αγγελική, να το κοιτάξεις αυτό! (Angelikí, na to kitáxis aftó!)

    Her college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Angeliki, you should get that checked!”
    Use this sentence to show sarcasm in a humorous way.

    3- Κρύο καιρός για δύο! (Krío kerós ya dío!)

    Her high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “When it’s cold, it’s time for two!”
    Use this sentence when you want to imply that it’s the ideal weather for romance.

    4- Θα συμφωνήσω με τη Γεωργία… (Tha simfoníso me ti Yeoryía̷ ;)

    Her friend, Sotíris, makes a comment meaning - “I agree with Georgia…”
    Use this sentence when you agree with someone.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • γκαντεμιά (gademiá): “bad luck, misfortune, shoot (as an interjection)”
  • καιρός (kerós): “weather, time”
  • πάλι (páli): “again, also used for emphasis in speech”
  • αρέσω (aréso): “to like, to be liked”
  • πολύ (polí): “very, much, too”
  • κοιτάζω (kitázo): “to look, to stare, to glance”
  • κρύο (krío): “cold”
  • συμφωνώ (simfonó): “to agree”
  • How would you comment in Greek when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Greek

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Sotíris changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of him and Dimitra, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sotíris’s post.

    Κι επίσημα πλέον σε σχέση… (Ki epísima pléon se schési̷ ;)
    “And officially in a relationship…”

    1- κι επίσημα πλέον (ki epísima pléon)

    First is a phrase meaning “and officially.”
    You can use this phrase before announcing something important like when you get married, engaged or even become jobless.

    2- σε σχέση (se schési)

    Then comes the phrase - “in a relationship.”
    When you want to change your relationship status on social media, the option you need to select, on a Greek interface, is σε σχέση.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sotíris’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Αχ δεν ξέρετε πόσο χαίρομαι για σας! (Ah den xérete póso hérome ya sas!)

    His neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “Oh, you guys don’t know how happy I am for both of you!”
    Use this sentence to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    2- Πες μας κάτι που δεν ξέραμε! (Pes mas káti pu den xérame!)

    His college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Tell us something we don’t know!”
    Use this sentence to show you are not surprised.

    3- Να κι ένα καλό νέο σήμερα. Συγχαρητήρια, παιδιά! (Na ki éna kaló néo símera. Sinharitíria, pediá!)

    His supervisor, Dionísis, makes a comment meaning - “There’s the good news of the day. Congratulations, you guys!”
    Use these sentences to congratulate someone.

    4- Η αλήθεια είναι επιτέλους γυμνή! (I alíthia íne epitélus yimní!)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Míltos, makes a comment meaning - “The truth is finally out!”
    Use this standard comment to be a bit sarcastic and funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • επίσημα (epísima): “officially”
  • πλέον (pléon): “already, any more, any longer”
  • σχέση (schési): “relationship”
  • ξέρω (xéro): “to know, to be aware of”
  • χαίρομαι (hérome): “to be glad, to enjoy, to be delighted”
  • νέο (néo): “news (singular)”
  • συγχαρητήρια (sinharitíria): “congratulations”
  • αλήθεια (alíthia): “truth, reality”
  • What would you say in Greek when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Greek

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Greek.

    Dímitra is getting married today, so she leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Dímitra’s post.

    Σήμερα είναι η πιο ευτυχισμένη μέρα της ζωής μου! (Símera íne i pio eftihizméni méra tis zoís mu!)
    “Today is the happiest day of my life!”

    1- σήμερα είναι (símera íne)

    First is a phrase meaning “today is.”
    This is a very common phrase to use when you want to talk about your day. Usually what follows includes the phrase η μέρα, meaning “the day.”

    2- η πιο ευτυχισμένη μέρα της ζωής μου (i pio eftihizméni méra tis zoís mu)

    Then comes the phrase - “the happiest day of my life.”
    In Greek, the superlative degree is not always monolectic like the English word “happiest”, for example. In order to form the periphrastic superlative degree, you have to use a definite article, then the adverb πιο, plus the adjective or participle in the positive degree; for example, η πιο ευτυχισμένη, which means “the happiest.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Dímitra’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Αυτός ο γάμος θα αφήσει εποχή! (Aftós o gámos tha afísi epohí!)

    Her high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “This wedding will make history!”
    Use this sentence to indicate that an event will be unforgettable.

    2- Να ζήσετε, να ευτυχίσετε! (Na zísete, na eftihísete!)

    Her neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “Live long, be happy!”
    Use this common wish whenever someone gets married.

    3- Σας εύχομαι από καρδιάς «βίον ανθόσπαρτον». (Sas éfhome apó kardiás “víon anthósparton”.)

    Her supervisor, Dionísis, makes a comment meaning - “I wish wholeheartedly that your life will be a road paved with roses.”
    Use this expression when you want to sound a bit formal.

    4- Άντε και καλούς απογόνους! (Áde ke kalús apogónus!)

    Her college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Well, have good offspring!”
    Use this common expression to wish newly-weds a happy family with kids.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ευτυχισμένος (eftihizménos): “happy”
  • ζωή (zoí): “life”
  • γάμος (gámos): “marriage, wedding”
  • εποχή (epohí): “era, season, time, age”
  • ευτυχώ (eftihó): “to be happy”
  • εύχομαι (éfhome): “to wish”
  • καρδιά (kardiá): “heart”
  • απόγονος (apógonos): “descendant”
  • How would you respond in Greek to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Greek

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Greek.

    Sotíris finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sotíris’s post.

    Είμαστε τρεις! (Ímaste tris!)
    “We are three!”

    1- είμαστε τρεις (ímaste tris)

    Just like in English, this phrase has become a popular way of announcing a pregnancy on social media. However, Greek women rarely post pictures of their naked belly or ultrasound to show the world that they’re pregnant. Most Greek women like to protect their privacy.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sotíris’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Συγχαρητήρια! Κορίτσι ή αγόρι; (Sinharitíria! Korítsi í agóri?)

    His wife’s nephew, Míltos, makes a comment meaning - “Congratulations! Boy or girl?”
    Use these sentences when you want to ask after a baby’s gender.

    2- Θέλω να είμαι η νονά! (Thélo na íme i noná!)

    His wife’s high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “I want to be the godmother!”
    Use this sentence to show you want to be involved and committed to the child’s spiritual growth.

    3- Θα είναι το πιο όμορφο μωρό του κόσμου! (Tha íne to pio ómorfo moró tu kósmu!)

    His neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “It will be the most beautiful baby in the world!”
    Use this sentence to compliment parents with an unborn baby’s looks.

    4- Θα τρελαθώ! Συγχαρητήρια, παιδιά! (Tha trelathó! Sinharitíria, pediá!)

    His high school friend, Hristína, makes a comment meaning - “This is so exciting! (lit. “I’m getting crazy!” ) Congratulations, you guys!”
    Use these sentences to show you are extremely happy.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • τρεις (tris): “three”
  • κορίτσι (korítsi): “girl”
  • αγόρι (agóri): “boy”
  • νονά (noná): “godmother”
  • όμορφος (ómorfos): “beautiful, pretty, handsome”
  • μωρό (moró): “baby, babe”
  • κόσμος (kózmos): “world, people, crowd, cosmos”
  • τρελαίνομαι (trelénome): “to go crazy, to love, to be amazed, to be shocked”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Greek Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Greek.

    Dímitra plays with her baby, posts an image of her, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Dímitra’s post.

    Ο θησαυρός μου… (O thisavrós mu̷ ;)
    “My treasure…”

    1- ο θησαυρός μου (o thisavrós mu)

    Greeks often use the word θησαυρός, meaning “treasure”, as a way to address someone dear and precious to them. Children, grandchildren and partners are often someone’s “treasure.” As far as social media is concerned, most parents don’t post pictures of their children anywhere on the internet. There’s a lot of awareness about the dangers of such habits.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Dímitra’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Να σας ζήσει! (Na sas zísi!)

    Her supervisor, Dionísis, makes a comment meaning - “May she live long!”
    Use this standard expression to wish a newborn well-being.

    2- Είναι τσαχπίνα σαν τη μάνα της! (Íne tsahpína san ti mána tis!)

    Her high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “She’s a flirt just like her mother!”
    Use this sentence if you want to keep a humorous tone.

    3- Κουκλάκι ζωγραφιστό! Φτου φτου φτου! (Kukláki zografistó! Ftu ftu ftu!)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Hristína, makes a comment meaning - “She’s as cute as a doll! Ptooey ptooey ptooey!”
    Use these sentences to compliment the baby and also protect it against the evil eye, a common superstition in Greece when giving a compliment.

    4- Είναι μια γλύκα! (Íne mia glíka!)

    Her college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “She’s so cute!”
    Use this sentence to show you are feeling heartwarmed.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • θησαυρός (thisavrós): “treasure”
  • ζω (zo): “to live”
  • τσαχπίνα (tsahpína): “coquette, flirt”
  • μάνα (mána): “mother”
  • κουκλάκι (kukláki): “little doll, dolly, small stuffed animal, beautiful and cute (figuratively)”
  • ζωγραφιστός (zografistós): “painted, very beautiful (figuratively)”
  • φτου (ftu): “ptooey (onomatopoeic word from the sound of spitting)”
  • γλύκα (glíka): “sweetness, cuteness”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Greek! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Greek Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Sotíris goes to a family gathering, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sotíris’s post.

    Επιτέλους όλη η οικογένεια μαζί! (Epitélus óli i ikoyénia mazí!)
    “Finally, the whole family together!”

    1- επιτέλους (epitélus)

    First is an adverb meaning “finally.”
    You can use this adverb to talk about a long-awaited event. Sometimes you can use it as is on social media, but you would have to post a very self-explanatory picture. For example, a picture of you holding your university degree.

    2- όλη η οικογένεια μαζί (óli i ikoyénia mazí)

    Then comes the phrase - “the whole family together.”
    Occasions where all family members get together is becoming rarer in Greece. Although relatives may live close to each other, modern lifestyles keep people busy. However, during important holidays such as Easter, Christmas, and New Year, families get together no matter what.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sotíris’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Άντε και του χρόνου! (Áde ke tu hrónu!)

    His wife’s nephew, Míltos, makes a comment meaning - “Next year again!”
    Use this standard expression in occasions where you want them to repeat next year.

    2- Όντως, πρέπει να το κάνουμε αυτό πιο συχνά. (Óndos, prépi na to kánume aftó pio sihná.)

    His wife, Dímitra, makes a comment meaning - “Indeed, we need to do this more often.”
    Use this sentence for occasions that don’t happen as often as you’d like.

    3- Ωραία οικογένεια! (Oréa ikoyénia!)

    His college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Nice family!”
    Use this sentence to show you are feeling heartwarmed.

    4- Η οικογένεια είναι το σημαντικότερο πράγμα. (I ikoyénia íne to simandikótero prágma.)

    His wife’s high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “Family is the most important thing.”
    Use this sentence to show you appreciate your family too, and it is also an opinion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • επιτέλους (epitélus): “at last, finally”
  • όλος (ólos): “whole, all, entire”
  • οικογένεια (ikoyénia): “family”
  • μαζί (mazí): “together, with”
  • όντως (óndos): “indeed”
  • συχνά (sihná): “often”
  • σημαντικότερος (simandikóteros): “more/most important”
  • πράγμα (ikoyénia): “thing, stuff”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Greek

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Greek about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Dímitra waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Dímitra’s post.

    Παρ’ όλη την καθυστέρηση, Βιέννη, σου ερχόμαστε! (Par’ óli tin kathistérisi, Viéni, su erhómaste!)
    “Despite the delay, Vienna, here we come!”

    1- παρ’ όλη την καθυστέρηση (par’ óli tin kathistérisi)

    First is a phrase meaning “despite the delay.”
    In this phrase, we have the preposition παρά used in its contracted form (παρ’ with an apostrophe) because the word that follows begins with a vowel (όλη). This grammatical phenomenon is called έκθλιψη in Greek, and ecthlipsis in English. However, it only happens to some words, usually prepositions, so not all words that end with a vowel.

    2- Βιέννη, σου ερχόμαστε (Viéni, su erhómaste)

    Then comes the phrase - “Vienna, here we come.”
    Just like in English, this type of expression is very common in Greek too. You can replace the word Βιέννη for any other word that denotes location, like city or country names.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Dímitra’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Μην ξεχάσεις να μου φέρεις τα σουβενίρ που σου είπα! (Min xehásis na mu féris ta suvenír pu su ípa!)

    Her neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “Don’t forget to bring me the souvenirs I told you (about)!”
    Use this sentence structure whenever you need to remind someone of something.

    2- Η αγαπημένη μου πόλη! Καλά να περάσετε! (I agapiméni mu póli! Kalá na perásete!)

    Her high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “My favorite city! Have a good time!”
    Use the last sentence when people you know go on a trip.

    3- Να προσέχετε τη μικρή! (Na proséhete ti mikrí!)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Hristína, makes a comment meaning - “Take care of the little one!”
    Use this sentence to show affection.

    4- Ακόμα εδώ είστε; Άντε, καλό ταξίδι! (Akóma edó íste? Áde, kaló taxídi!)

    Her college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Are you guys still here? Have a good trip (already)!”
    Use the last sentence when people you know go on a trip and want to wish them well.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • παρά (pará): “despite”
  • καθυστέρηση (kathistérisi): “delay, retardation”
  • έρχομαι (érhome): “to come”
  • ξεχνάω (xehnáo): “to forget”
  • φέρνω (férno): “to bring”
  • σουβενίρ (suvenír): “souvenir”
  • πόλη (póli): “city, town”
  • ακόμα (akóma): “still, yet, even”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Greek!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is even better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Greek

    So maybe you’re strolling around at a local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Greek phrases!

    Sotíris finds an unusual item at a local market in Vienna, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sotíris’s post.

    Αυτό τώρα τι μπορεί να είναι; Ακούω προτάσεις… (Aftó tóra ti borí na íne? Akúo protásis̷ ;)
    “Now, what could this be? Any suggestions…”

    1- αυτό τώρα τι μπορεί να είναι (aftó tóra ti borí na íne)

    First is a phrase meaning “now, what could this be.”
    In this expression and context, the word τώρα, meaning “now”, is used mainly to emphasize the curiosity of the speaker rather than signifying the present time. Τώρα can be replaced with the word πάλι, meaning “again”, without changing the meaning. Altogether you would have Αυτό πάλι τι μπορεί να είναι, and it would still mean the same thing: “Now, what could this be?”

    2- ακούω προτάσεις (akúo protásis)

    Then comes the phrase - “any suggestions.”
    When people need suggestions in English they usually say “Any suggestions?” But in Greek you have to use the verb ακούω, meaning “to listen”, and literally say “I’m listening (to) suggestions”, ακούω προτάσεις.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sotíris’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Σταμάτα να ασχολείσαι με σαβούρες, λέω εγώ! (Stamáta na ascholíse me savúres, léo egó!)

    His wife’s nephew, Míltos, makes a comment meaning - “I say stop messing around with junk!”
    Use this sentence if you feel a bit cynical and negative.

    2- Σίγουρα όχι το σουβενίρ μου! (Sígura óhi to suvenír mu!)

    His college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Definitely not my souvenir!”
    Use this sentence if you want to be funny.

    3- Μοιάζει με αποτυχημένο έργο τέχνης… (Miázi me apotihiméno érgo téhnis̷ ;)

    His high school friend, Hristína, makes a comment meaning - “It looks like a piece of art gone wrong…”
    Use this sentence to show you are… imaginative!

    4- Από πού είναι αυτό; Από το μέλλον; (Apó pú íne aftó? Apó to mélon?)

    His neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “Where is this from? From the future?”
    Use this sentence if you want to be humorous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • πρόταση (prótasi): “suggestion, proposition, proposal, sentence”
  • σταματάω (stamatáo): “to stop”
  • ασχολούμαι (ascholúme): “to be occupied with”
  • σαβούρα (savúra): “junk, trash, schlock, junk food (figuratively), very ugly woman (as an insult)”
  • σίγουρα (sígura): “certainly, for sure, sure, definitely, safely”
  • μοιάζω (miázo): “to look like, to resemble, to seem, to look alike”
  • αποτυχημένος (apotihiménos): “failed, unsuccessful”
  • μέλλον (mélon): “future”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find, or learn something new and interesting while you’re on holiday.

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Greek

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Greek, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo!

    Dímitra visits a famous landmark in Vienna, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Dímitra’s post.

    Η πόλη αυτή απλά δεν υπάρχει! (I póli aftí aplá den ipárhi!)
    “This city is just incredible!”

    1- η πόλη αυτή (i póli aftí)

    First is a phrase meaning “this city.”
    In Greek, word order is flexible when it comes to demonstrative pronouns and the nouns they define. Here, for example, you could say η πόλη αυτή or αυτή η πόλη to mean “this city.”

    2- απλά δεν υπάρχει (aplá den ipárhi)

    Then comes the expression - “is just incredible.”
    This is a slang expression that people recently started using in everyday life and on social media. What this literally means is “it just doesn’t exist.” You can use this to emphasize the fact that something is incredibly nice, good or beautiful. You can also omit the word απλά, meaning “just”, and simply say δεν υπάρχει, “it doesn’t exist”, i.e., “it’s incredible” or “it’s awesome.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Dímitra’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Όπως εδώ ένα πράμα… (Ópos edó éna práma̷ ;)

    Her supervisor, Dionísis, makes a comment meaning - “Just like here…”
    Use this sentence to be sarcastic.

    2- Παραμυθένια! (Paramithénia!)

    Her neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “Fairytale-like!”
    Use this sentence to describe a place as enchanting.

    3- Μήπως να μετακομίσω εκεί; (Mípos na metakomíso ekí?)

    Her college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Maybe I should move there?”
    Use this sentence if you want to be humorous.

    4- Ζηλεύω…! (Zilévo…!)

    Her high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “I’m jealous…!”
    Use this sentence to show you are jealous in a good way.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • απλά (aplá): “simply, just”
  • υπάρχω (ipárho): “to exist, to be”
  • όπως (ópos): “like, just like, such as”
  • εδώ (edó): “here”
  • g

  • πράμα (práma): “thing, stuff (colloquially)”
  • παραμυθένιος (paramithénios): “fairytale-like”
  • μήπως (mípos): “maybe, whether, lest, for fear that”
  • μετακομίζω (metakomízo): “to move (in/out), to relocate”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Greek

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Greek!

    Sotíris relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sotíris’s post.

    Ώρα για έναν χαλαρωτικό περίπατο στον ανακτορικό κήπο. (Óra ya énan halarotikó perípato ston anaktorikó kípo.)
    “Time for a relaxing stroll in the palace garden.”

    1- ώρα για (óra ya)

    First is a phrase meaning “time for.”
    What usually follows this phrase is a noun in the accusative. For example, with the noun περίπατος, meaning “stroll,” you can say ώρα για περίπατο, which means “time for a stroll.” Of course, there might also be adjectives or other words that define the noun, just like in our lesson: ώρα για έναν χαλαρωτικό περίπατο, “time for a relaxing stroll.”

    2- έναν χαλαρωτικό περίπατο στον ανακτορικό κήπο (énan halarotikó perípato ston anaktorikó kípo)

    Then comes the phrase - “a relaxing stroll in the palace garden.”
    All the words in this phrase are in the accusative case because we are using the prepositions για (”for” ) and σε (”in” ). Keep in mind that using most prepositions in Greek (ex. με, σε, για, ως, προς, από, παρά, κατά etc.) will require an accusative after them.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sotíris’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ουάου! (Uáu!)

    His high school friend, Hristína, makes a comment meaning - “Wow!”
    Use this interjection to show your amazement.

    2- Πρέπει να περνάτε καταπληκτικά! (Prépi na pernáte katapliktiká!)

    His neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “You guys must be having a great time!”
    Use this sentence to show you are feeling positive.

    3- Πολιτισμός, ρε φίλε… (Politizmós, re fíle̷ ;)

    His college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Dude, there’s so much culture in that country… (lit. “Dude, culture…” )”
    Use this colloquial sentence to show you feel impressed.

    4- Εσείς μάλλον δεν θα θέλετε να φύγετε από κει! (Esís málon den tha thélete na fíyete apó ki!)

    His wife’s high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “You guys probably don’t want to leave that place!”
    Use this sentence to show you are feeling positive.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ώρα (óra): “time, hour”
  • χαλαρωτικός (halarotikós): “relaxing”
  • περίπατος (perípatos): “walk, stroll”
  • ανακτορικός (anaktorikós): “palatial, pertaining to or resembling a palace”
  • κήπος (kípos): “garden”
  • πολιτισμός (politizmós): “culture, civilization”
  • μάλλον (málon): “probably, maybe, perhaps, rather”
  • φεύγω (févgo): “to leave, to go away, to come off”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Greek When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Dímitra returns home after a vacation, posts an image of her place, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Dímitra’s post.

    Σπίτι μου, σπιτάκι μου. (Spíti mu, spitáki mu.)
    “Home sweet home.”

    1- σπίτι μου (spíti mu)

    First is a phrase meaning “home.”
    In Greek, the word σπίτι can mean either “house” or “home.” That means you can use this word even if you live in an apartment, which is where most Greeks live.

    2- σπιτάκι μου (spitáki mu)

    Then comes the phrase - “sweet home.”
    Σπιτάκι is a diminutive of the noun σπίτι, meaning “house” or “home.” Greeks use diminutives not only to refer to things that are smaller than normal, but to refer to something with affection, such as someone’s sweet home. Note that while the English expression “home sweet home” does not contain any possessive pronouns, in Greek, we need to use μου twice.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Dímitra’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ελπίζω να μου έφερες τα σουβενίρ που σου ζήτησα! (Elpízo na mu éferes ta suvenír pu su zítisa!)

    Her neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “I hope you brought me the souvenirs I asked for!”
    Use this sentence to sound assertive.

    2- Καλώς ήρθατε στη ζούγκλα! (Kalós írthate sti zúngla!)

    Her high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “Welcome to the jungle!”
    Use this sentence to be sarcastic.

    3- Περάσατε καλά; (Perásate kalá?)

    Her supervisor, Dionísis, makes a comment meaning - “Did you have a good time?”
    Use this question when someone you know comes back from a trip.

    4- Και τώρα τα κεφάλια μέσα! (Ke tóra ta kefália mésa!)

    Her college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “And now the party’s over! (lit. “Now heads inside!” )”
    Use this sentence to show you are being realistic.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • σπίτι (spíti): “house, home”
  • σπιτάκι (spitáki): “little or sweet house or home (affectionate)”
  • ελπίζω (elpízo): “to hope”
  • ζητάω (zitáo): “to ask for”
  • καλώς ήρθες/-ατε (kalós írthes/-ate): “welcome”
  • ζούγκλα (zúngla): “jungle”
  • κεφάλι (kefáli): “head”
  • μέσα (mésa): “in, within, inside”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public celebratory event, such as an Easter fireworks show?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Greek

    It’s a festive day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Sotíris watches the Easter fireworks show, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sotíris’s post.

    Χριστός Ανέστη! (Hristós Anésti!)
    “Christ is Risen!”

    1- Χριστός Ανέστη (Hristós Anésti)

    On the night before Easter Sunday, Greeks attend church, and at midnight, when the priest announces that Christ is resurrected, everyone starts singing a religious chant that begins with the phrase Χριστός Ανέστη, which means “Christ is Risen.” This religious phrase is also used to greet people after the night of the Resurrection. The proper response to this greeting is Αληθώς Ανέστη, which means “Truly, He is Risen.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sotíris’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Η πρώτη μας Ανάσταση με τη μικρή! (I próti mas Anástasi me ti mikrí!)

    His wife, Dímitra, makes a comment meaning - “Our first Resurrection with the little one!”
    Use this sentence to show you are feeling emotional.

    2- Αληθώς Ανέστη! (Alithós Anésti!)

    His neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “Truly He is Risen!”
    Always use this sentence as a response to Χριστός Ανέστη (Hristós Anésti) meaning “Christ is Risen.”

    3- Η μικρή πρέπει να έχει φρικάρει με όλη τη φασαρία… (I mikrí prépi na éhi frikári me óli ti fasaría̷ ;)

    His college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “The little one must be freaking out with all the noise…”
    Use this sentence to show you are feeling concerned.

    4- Χρόνια πολλά και ευτυχισμένος ο καινούριος Πάσχας! (Hrónia polá ke eftihizménos o kenúrios Páschas!)

    His wife’s nephew, Míltos, makes a comment meaning - “Merry years and a happy new Easter! (a common humorous expression)”
    Use this sentence if you want to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Χριστός (Hristós): “Christ”
  • πρώτος (prótos): “first”
  • ανάσταση (anástasi): “resurrection”
  • μικρή (mikrí): “little one (feminine), kiddo”
  • πρέπει (prépi): “must, have to”
  • φρικάρω (frikáro): “to freak out”
  • φασαρία (fasaría): “noise, fuss, trouble, commotion”
  • πολύς (polís): “many, plenty, a lot of”
  • If a friend posted something about Easter, which phrase would you use?

    Easter and other festive days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Greek

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Dímitra is at her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Dímitra’s post.

    Πάρτι έκπληξη! (Párti ékplixi!)
    “Surprise party!”

    1- πάρτι έκπληξη (párti ékplixi)

    This expression works just like its English equivalent (”surprise party.” ) However, in a real situation, guests in Greece would probably surprise the birthday person by saying “Χρόνια Πολλά!”, meaning “Happy birthday!”, rather than saying “Surprise!”, or “Έκπληξη!”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Dímitra’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Χα! Δεν το περίμενες ε; (Ha! Den to perímenes e?)

    Her high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “Ha! You weren’t expecting that, uh?”
    Use these sentences to show you knew about the surprise.

    2- Χρόνια σου πολλά μωρό μου! (Hrónia su polá moró mu!)

    Her husband, Sotíris, makes a comment meaning - “Happy birthday my baby!”
    Use this sentence to wish happy birthday to your love partner.

    3- Χιλιόχρονη! Πάντα υγιής και ευτυχισμένη! (Hilióhroni! Pánda iyiís ke eftihizméni!)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Hristína, makes a comment meaning - “Live a thousand years! Be always healthy and happy!”
    Use these alternative sentences to wish someone a happy birthday.

    4- Να τα εκατοστίσεις! (Na ta ekatostísis!)

    Her nephew, Míltos, makes a comment meaning - “May you become one hundred years old!”
    Use this standard expression with people that are close to you to wish them happy birthday.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • πάρτι (párti): “party”
  • έκπληξη (ékplixi): “surprise”
  • περιμένω (periméno): “to wait, to expect”
  • ε (e): “uh, hey, right”
  • χιλιόχρονος (hilióhronos): “one who is one thousand years old”
  • πάντα (pánda): “always, constantly, ever”
  • υγιής (iyiís): “healthy”
  • εκατοστίζω (ekatostízo): “to reach one hundred years of age”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Greek

    Impress your friends with your Greek New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Sotíris celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sotíris’s post.

    Καλή χρονιά σε όλους! (Kalí hroniá se ólus!)
    “Happy New Year, everyone!”

    1- καλή χρονιά (kalí hroniá)

    First is a standard expression meaning “Happy New Year.”
    In Greek, when we want to wish someone a “Happy New Year!”, we literally say “Good year!”, or Καλή χρονιά! Keep in mind that unlike in English, the word for “year” in Greek should be lowercase.

    2- σε όλους (se ólus)

    Then comes the phrase - “everyone.”
    This is a very common thing to say after a greeting, especially on social media, because we are speaking to many people at the same time.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sotíris’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Τις ευχές μου για ένα πραγματικά ευτυχισμένο νέο έτος. (Tis efhés mu ya éna pragmatiká eftihizméno néo étos.)

    His neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “Wishes for a truly happy new year.”
    Use this sentence to show your wishes come from the heart.

    2- Υγεία, αγάπη κι ευτυχία για εσένα και την οικογένειά σου. (Iyía, agápi ki eftihía ya eséna ke tin ikoyéniá su.)

    His supervisor, Dionísis, makes a comment meaning - “Health, love and happiness for you and your family.”
    This is a typical wish that is commonly used.

    3- …και από Δευτέρα δίαιτα! (…ke apó Deftéra díeta!)

    His wife’s nephew, Míltos, makes a comment meaning - “…and diet starts on Monday!”
    Use this sentence to sound funny and tease.

    4- Άντε και του χρόνου παντρεμένες οι ελεύθερες! (Áde ke tu hrónu pandreménes i eléftheres!)

    His high school friend, Hristína, makes a comment meaning - “And may next year all the single ladies be married!”
    Use this sentence to sound hopeful.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • χρονιά (hroniá): “year”
  • όλος (ólos): “everyone, everybody”
  • ευχή (efhí): “wish, blessing”
  • πραγματικά (pragmatiká): “really, truly, indeed”
  • έτος (étos): “year”
  • δίαιτα (díeta): “diet”
  • παντρεμένος (pandreménos): “married”
  • ελεύθερος (eléftheros): “free, single, clear”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Greek

    What will you say in Greek about Christmas?

    Dímitra celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Dímitra’s post.

    Καλά Χριστούγεννα κι από μας! (Kalá Hristúyena ki apó mas!)
    “Merry Christmas from us too!”

    1- καλά Χριστούγεννα (kalá Hristúyena)

    First is a standard expression meaning “Merry Christmas.”
    Καλά Χριστούγεννα is the standard way of wishing someone a “Merry Christmas” in Greek. What Greek people are literally saying, though, is “good Christmas.” Keep in mind that you don’t need to capitalize the word καλά unless it’s at the beginning of the sentence.

    2- κι από μας (ki apó mas)

    Then comes the phrase - “from us too.”
    You can use this phrase when you greet someone on behalf of a bigger group of people, such as your family.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Dímitra’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Και τι Χριστούγεννα… λευκά! (Ke ti Hristúyena… lefká!)

    Her neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “And what a Christmas… white!”
    Use this sentence to show you are feeling delighted about the snow.

    2- Καλά, τα μελομακάρονα που μου έδωσες είναι θεϊκά! (Kalá, ta melomakárona pu mu édoses íne theiká!)

    Her high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “Man, the honey biscuits you gave me are divine!”
    Use this sentence to give a compliment about food.

    3- Για δώσε κάνα μελομακάρονο και από δω μεριά! (Ya dóse kána melomakárono ke apó do meriá!)

    Her college friend, Mihális, makes a comment meaning - “Hey, pass me some honey biscuits too, will you!”
    Use this sentence to show you are feeling light hearted.

    4- Και του χρόνου με υγεία. (Ke tu hrónu me iyía.)

    Her supervisor, Dionísis, makes a comment meaning - “Next year again with good health.”
    This is a typical and commonly-used comment.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Χριστούγεννα (Hristúyena): “Christmas”
  • λευκός (lefkós): “white”
  • μελομακάρονο (melomakárono): “Greek honey biscuits”
  • θεϊκός (theikós): “divine, awesome (figuratively)”
  • κάνας (kánas): “some (colloquial)”
  • δω (do): “here”
  • μεριά (meriá): “side”
  • υγεία (iyía): “health”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Greek

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Greek phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Sotíris celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sotíris’s post.

    Σαν σήμερα πριν από έναν χρόνο παντρεύτηκα τη γυναίκα της ζωής μου. (San símera prin apó énan hróno pandréftika ti yinéka tis zoís mu.)
    “A year ago today, I married the woman of my life.”

    1- σαν σήμερα πριν από έναν χρόνο (san símera prin apó énan hróno)

    First is a phrase meaning “a year ago today.”
    In Greek, you must pay close attention to word order as it is different from the equivalent expression in English. Depending on the amount of time you want to express, you must change the last part of the phrase. In this case, the end of the phrase is έναν χρόνο, which means “one year.”

    2- παντρεύτηκα τη γυναίκα της ζωής μου (pandréftika ti yinéka tis zoís mu)

    Then comes the phrase - “I married the woman of my life.”
    Greeks also say “woman of my life” or “man of my life” to show their partners how much they mean to them. So if your significant other is Greek, you can use the expressions η γυναίκα της ζωής μου or ο άντρας της ζωής μου accordingly. This will not only surprise them but melt their hearts as well.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sotíris’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Σ’ αγαπώ με όλη μου την καρδιά! (S’ agapó me óli mu tin kardiá!)

    His wife, Dímitra, makes a comment meaning - “I love you with all my heart!”
    Use this sentence to express your love.

    2- Αχ έτσι αγαπημένοι να είστε πάντα! (Ah étsi agapiméni na íste pánda!)

    His neighbor, Angelikí, makes a comment meaning - “Aw, may you always love each other like that!”
    Use this sentence to show you are feeling touched by someone’s love.

    3- Παιδιά, σιγά τα μέλια, θα γλιστρήσουμε! (Pediá, sigá ta mélia, tha glistrísume!)

    His wife’s nephew, Míltos, makes a comment meaning - “You guys, take it easy with the sweet talk; we’ll slip from all the honey!”
    Use this sentence to show you are somewhat cynical but also funny.

    4- Το καλύτερο κορίτσι πήρες! (To kalítero korítsi píres!)

    His wife’s high school friend, Yeoryía, makes a comment meaning - “You got the best girl!”
    Use this sentence to show your appreciation of a person.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • πριν (prin): “before, earlier, ago”
  • παντρεύομαι (pandrévome): “to get married, to wed”
  • γυναίκα (yinéka): “woman, wife”
  • αγαπώ (agapó): “to love”
  • αγαπημένος (agapiménos): “favorite, beloved, dear”
  • σιγά (sigá): “slowly, gently, noiselessly, easy on/with”
  • μέλι (méli): “honey”
  • γλιστράω (glistráo): “to slip, to slide, to glide, to creep”
  • If a friend posted something about anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Greek! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using mobile phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek

    How to Say Sorry in Greek

    You may be wondering how to say sorry in learning Greek, and this is a good thing! It’s so important, actually, that we’ve dedicated this article to explaining how to say sorry in Greek phrases.

    When it comes to expressing regret, the phrase “I’m sorry” is the most common. However, another way to express it is through a more formal apology. Did you know that the word “apology” has ancient Greek roots? Indeed it emerges from the Greek word απολογία (apoloyía) which means “apology.” More specifically, it consists of two parts: [από (apó) — “from”] + [λόγος (lógos) — “speech”].

    Greeks are kind-hearted and polite people, so no need to worry if you do make a mistake. Simply apologize in a proper way, and everything will be fine.

    Regardless of the occasion, GreekPod101.com is here to teach you how to say you’re sorry in Greek for a wide variety of occasions. In this article, we’ll provide you with almost all of the potential alternatives. As in English, in Greek there are many relative expressions, such as “I’m sorry,” “Apologies,” “Many apologies,” and more. Each one of them can be used in a different setting. Some of them are more formal, others are slang expressions, and still others are used in everyday life between friends.

    So, let’s begin! Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Greek Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

    1. Saying I’m Sorry Informally
    2. Saying I’m Sorry Formally
    3. Saying I’m Sorry Desperately
    4. Slang Phrases to Say I’m Sorry
    5. Other Phrases to Say I’m Sorry
    6. How to Reply to an Apology
    7. Cultural Insights
    8. Conclusion

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek


    1. Saying I’m Sorry Informally

    Couple Looking Out a Window

    We all make mistakes every day. Especially when you get in touch with people from different countries, it’s likely that you don’t know all the proper customs. So, saying you’re sorry in an informal environment is an integral part of everyday life. Especially in Greece, offering an apology in a formal or a business environment can be highly appreciated and can get you through some uncomfortable situations.

    The most simple and common way to say “I’m sorry” is by saying Συγγνώμη (Signómi), meaning “Sorry.” Let’s have a look at the first example below.

    Example 1: Συγγνώμη (Signómi) — “Sorry”
    Greek: Συγγνώμη που άργησα.
    Romanization: Signómi pu áryisa.
    Translation: “Sorry for being late.”

    Are you often late? Wondering how to say “Sorry I’m late” in Greek , because you know you’ll need it? No problem! (But, seriously, try not to be late often; it’s not polite, even if Greeks tend to be late!) You can use the above example to say you’re sorry for being late. In any other case, when talking with friends, a simple Συγγνώμη might do the job, if the other individual knows what went wrong. If it’s not clear what you’re apologizing for, Συγγνώμη should probably be accompanied by the reason you’re sorry.

    People Going Down Stairs

    Tip: You don’t need to know all the possible reasons that might arise. You can simply use the following general phrases, shown in the following two examples.

    Example 2: Σου ζητώ συγγνώμη (Su zitó signómi) — “I apologize” / Literally: “I am asking you to forgive me.”
    Greek: Σου ζητώ συγγνώμη για αυτό που έκανα.
    Romanization: Su zitó signómi ya aftó pu ékana.
    Translation: “I apologize for what I’ve done.” / “I am asking you to forgive me for what I’ve done.”

    With the phrase shown in example two, you actually ask for forgiveness, rather than simply stating that you’re sorry. It can also be used as a standalone phrase, by simply saying Σου ζητώ συγγνώμη (Su zitó signómi), when the other person knows what you’re apologizing for.

    Example 3: Λυπάμαι (Lipáme) — “I’m sorry” / “I feed sad”
    Greek: Λυπάμαι για αυτό που έγινε.
    Romanization: Lipáme ya aftó pu éyine.
    Translation: “I’m sorry for what happened.” / Literally: “I feel sad for what happened.”

    Λυπάμαι (Lipáme), literally means “I am sad.” It can be used as an alternative to Συγγνώμη (Signómi), but it is merely used when something really bad happened, regardless of if it was your fault or not. For example, when someone passes away, you can use Λυπάμαι to express that you’re sorry for the family, in accordance with the English phrase “I’m sorry.” It’s a good place to start when learning how to say “Sorry for your loss” in Greek, or even “I am sorry to hear that.”


    2. Saying I’m Sorry Formally

    3 Ways to Say Sorry

    In a formal setting, saying you’re sorry isn’t difficult either. In the two examples below, you can learn how to apologize for being late to a formal occasion. There’s typically no difference between their meanings, so just choose whichever you like.

    Example 1: Σας ζητώ συγγνώμη (Sas zitó signómi) — “I apologize”
    Greek: Σας ζητώ συγγνώμη για την καθυστέρηση.
    Romanization: Sas zitó signómi ya tin kathistérisi.
    Translation: “I apologize for the delay.”

    The phrase Σας ζητώ συγγνώμη (Sas zitó signómi) means “I apologize” and it’s often accompanied by a noun or a noun expression representing the reason why you’re sorry.

    Example 2: Με συγχωρείτε (Me sighoríte) — “Forgive me” / “Pardon me” / “Excuse me”
    Greek: Με συγχωρείτε που δεν μπόρεσα να έρθω νωρίτερα.
    Romanization: Me sinhoríte pu den bóresa na értho norítera.
    Translation: “Forgive me for not being able to come earlier.”

    On the contrary, the phrase Με συγχωρείτε (Me sihoríte), also stands perfectly on its own, (i.e. without stating a reason). In addition, Με συγχωρείτε is widely used when trying to pass by people in a crowded area. In that case, its meaning is similar to the English “pardon me” or “excuse me.”

    As in any other formal occasions, please note that in Greek, the honorific plural is used, as demonstrated in the above examples.


    3. Saying I’m Sorry Desperately

    Woman Apologizing

    Have you ever felt extremely sad for an incident, and wanted to say you’re sorry in a more…desperate way? We’ve got you covered.

    Greeks are very expressive people and aren’t afraid to show remorse. That said, here are the most common ways to express your deepest apologies in Greek.

    Example 1: Χίλια συγγνώμη (Hília signómi) — “Apologies” / Literally: “One thousand apologies”
    Greek: Χίλια συγγνώμη, δεν ήξερα τι έπρεπε να κάνω.
    Romanization: Hília signómi, den íksera ti éprepe na káno.
    Translation: “Many apologies, I didn’t know what I was supposed to do.” (Literally: “One thousand apologies, I didn’t know what I was supposed to do.)

    This is a very common expression, which expresses deep guilt and it can be used in both formal and informal settings. After all, who wouldn’t forgive you if you offered one thousand apologies?

    Example 2: Σας ζητώ ταπεινά συγγνώμη (Sas zitó tapiná signómi) — “I humbly apologize”
    Greek: Σας ζητώ ταπεινά συγγνώμη για το λάθος μου.
    Romanization: Sas zitó tapiná signómi ya to láthos mu.
    Translation: “I humbly apologize for my mistake.”

    As the American actor Kevin Hart said: “Being humble matters.” So, by apologizing in a humble way, you truly express your regret. This phrase shows a more formal tone and therefore it’s most commonly used in unfortunate formal occasions. In Greece, it’s often used by someone when talking to a person of superior status, given that the incident which took place or the mistake that was made was really serious.

    Example 3: Ειλικρινά συγγνώμη (Ilikriná signómi) — “Honestly I’m sorry”
    Greek: Ειλικρινά συγγνώμη για ό,τι έγινε.
    Romanization: Ilikriná signómi ya ó,ti éygine.
    Translation: “Honestly I am sorry for what happened.”

    The third example demonstrates another way to express how sorry you are, by saying that you’re honestly sorry for what happened. Nevertheless, it’s regarded as a formal expression.


    4. Slang Phrases to Say I’m Sorry

    Say Sorry

    Of course, as in any other language, in Greek there are some slang expressions to express an apology. Although we strongly advise that you don’t use them, as they’re not quite proper, we’re presenting two of the most common examples, so that you’ll be able to recognize them if you happen to hear them.

    Example 1: Σόρι (Sóri) — “Sorry”
    Greek: Σόρι, φίλε μου.
    Romanization: Sóri, fíle mu.
    Translation: “Sorry, my friend.”

    Despite the fact that this is a phrase you’ll hear being said amongst Greek teenagers and young people, it can be accepted as an apology in other occasions too, as almost all Greeks tend to integrate English words and phrases into their vocabulary.

    Example 2: Παρντόν (Pardón) — “Sorry”
    Greek: Παρντόν. Δικό μου το λάθος.
    Romanization: Pardón. Dikó mu to láthos.
    Translation: “Sorry. My mistake.”

    This is a more old-fashioned slang phrase that has a French origin. It was quite popular amongst males who wanted to appear dominant in the 70s and 80s. Today, it’s still used every now and then as a slang phrase, but not as often as the former.


    5. Other Phrases to Say I’m Sorry

    Hand with Sorry Written on It

    Here are some alternative phrases that can be used to say you’re sorry. More or less, all of the expressions below can be used regardless of the formality of the occasion.

    Example 1: Δεν θα το ξανακάνω (Den tha to xanakáno) — “I won’t do it again”
    Greek: Καταλαβαίνω τι έγινε και δεν θα το ξανακάνω.
    Romanization: Katalavéno ti éyine ke den tha to xanakáno.
    Translation: “I understand what happened and I won’t do it again.”

    Example 2: Δεν το εννοούσα (Den to enoúsa) — “I didn’t mean it”
    Greek: Συγγνώμη για αυτό που είπα. Δεν το εννοούσα.
    Romanization: Signómi ya aftó pu ípa. Den to enoúsa.
    Translation: “Sorry for what I’ve said. I didn’t mean it.”

    Example 3: Ελπίζω να με συγχωρέσεις (Elpízo na me sinhorésis) — “I hope you’ll forgive me”
    Greek: Καταλαβαίνω το λάθος μου και ελπίζω να με συγχωρέσεις.
    Romanization: Katalavéno to láthos mu ke elpízo na me sinhorésis.
    Translation: “I understand my mistake and I hope you will forgive me.”

    Example 4: Αναλαμβάνω την πλήρη ευθύνη (Analamváno tin plíri efthíni) — “I take full responsibility”
    Greek: Αναλαμβάνω την πλήρη ευθύνη για αυτό που έγινε.
    Romanization: Analamváno tin plíri efthíni ya aftó pu éyine.
    Translation: “I take full responsibility for what happened.”

    Example 5: Δεν έπρεπε να το είχα κάνει (Den éprepe na to íha káni) — “I shouldn’t have done it”
    Greek: Ειλικρινά το μετάνιωσα. Δεν έπρεπε να το είχα κάνει.
    Romanization: Ilikriná to metániosa. Den éprepe na to íha káni.
    Translation: “I honestly regret it. I shouldn’t have done it.”

    Example 6: Είναι δικό μου (το) λάθος (Íne dikó mu [to] láthos) — “It’s my mistake”
    Greek: Είναι δικό μου (το) λάθος και δεν θα ξανασυμβεί.
    Romanization: Íne dikó mu (to) láthos ke den tha xanasimví.
    Translation: “It was my mistake and it won’t happen again.”

    Example 7: Σε παρακαλώ, μη μου θυμώνεις (Se parakaló, mi mu thimónis) — “Please, don’t be mad at me”
    Greek: Σε παρακαλώ, μη μου θυμώνεις για αυτό που είπα.
    Romanization: Se parakaló, mi mu thimónis ya aftó pu ípa.
    Translation: “Please, don’t be mad at me for what I said.”


    6. How to Reply to an Apology

    Replying to an “I’m sorry” statement is common and polite in Greek culture. Here are some common phrases you can use when receiving an apology.

    Example 1: Σε συγχωρώ (Se sinhoró) — “I forgive you”
    Greek: Σε συγχωρώ, μην ανησυχείς.
    Romanization: Se sinhoró, min anisihís.
    Translation: “I forgive you, don’t worry.”

    Forgiving someone is the simplest and most polite way to reply to an apology in Greek. So, when someone says Συγγνώμη (Signómi) meaning “I’m sorry,” or even a similar expression such as the ones mentioned above, the proper reply is Σε συγχωρώ (Se sinhoró) meaning “I forgive you.” However, in many cases an even more polite way to accept an apology is to say Δεν πειράζει (Den pirázi) meaning “It’s alright” / “It doesn’t matter,” as shown in the example below. This phrase is most commonly used when the individual doesn’t use a phrase that includes being sorry, but uses another more descriptive phrase such as “It’s my fault” instead.

    Example 2: Δεν πειράζει (Den pirázi) — “It’s alright” / “It doesn’t matter”
    Greek: Δεν πειράζει, δεν έγινε τίποτα.
    Romanization: Den pirázi, den éyine típota.
    Translation: “It’s alright, nothing happened.”

    Both examples above can be used as a reply in formal as well as informal settings. On the contrary, the next example demonstrates a more informal way to reply to an “I’m sorry” statement, which is usually used between friends.

    Example 3: Συγχωρεμένος/-η (Sinhoreménos/ -i) — “You are forgiven”
    Greek: Δεν πειράζει, συγχωρεμένος/-η.
    Romanization: Den pirázi, sinhoreménos/-i.
    Translation: “It’s alright, you are forgiven.”

    In this case, Συγχωρεμένος (Sinhoreménos) is used when the person expressing an apology is male, and Συγχωρεμένη (Sinhoreméni) is used when the person is a female.


    7. Cultural Insights

    In Greece, saying you’re sorry or expressing an apology any other way is often accompanied by tilting the head a bit in the front and staring at the floor, as a sign of true remorse. The official religion of Greece has always been Orthodox Christianity, which is based on the concept of forgiveness, so the act of asking for forgiveness and forgiving is something deeply rooted in Greek culture. That makes learning how to say sorry in Greek culture very important!

    Nowadays, youngsters tend to avoid the phrases that include the word Συγγνώμη and try to use more descriptive phrases, only when necessary. It’s believed that this is based on the revolutionary spirit of young people, who try to avoid admitting their mistakes to older people (e.g. their parents).


    8. Conclusion

    Generally, Greeks are polite and forgiving. So, don’t be concerned if you make a mistake. We all make mistakes, after all. Just use the most appropriate phrase from those demonstrated in this article to say you’re sorry and everything’s going to be fine.

    Do you want to learn more expressions and listen to their pronunciation? Visit our list of phrases of the most Common Ways to Say Sorry.

    GreekPod101.com is dedicated to offering you a wide range of vocabulary, focusing on words and expressions used in everyday life. In addition, you can subscribe to our YouTube channel and enjoy free educational videos on the Greek language.

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    Greek Slang: Popular Greek Slang Words & Phrases

    In the new era of technology and constant texting through the internet, a wide variety of Greek slang words and phrases has emerged, aiming to simplify everyday communications. Some of them are abbreviations of Greek words, whereas others are English words adjusted to the Greek language.

    Communicating in Greek through various messaging applications, such as Messenger, Viber, Instagram, and so on, has become more and more popular amongst youngsters. In this regard, most Greeks tend to write Greek with English characters, based on the pronunciation of each word. That’s how Greeklish was born: A new form of communication.

    So, wondering what internet slang in Greek means? Or the Greek definition for slang?

    In this article, we’ve gathered the most popular Greek internet slang words and phrases, along with examples of their use. At GreekPod101.com, we focus on real cases and dialogues, bringing you easy-to-learn examples of Greek expressions and text slang.

    1. Τι λέει
    2. τέσπα
    3. αναπ
    4. μνμ
    5. ασαπ
    6. τπτ
    7. λολ
    8. γτ
    9. ΣΚ
    10. φλκ
    11. δλδ
    12. Conclusion

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    1. Τι λέει;

    Greek Abbreviation: - not applicable -
    Full Greek Expression: Τι λέει;
    Romanization: Ti léi?
    Meaning: “How is it going?”

    A Hand Holding a Smartphone Implying Messaging

    This phrase is commonly used as a conversation opener when people are communicating through instant messaging (Messenger App, Viber App, etc.). Here’s an example of dialogue to help you understand what this internet slang in Greek means:

    Greek:

    A: Τι λέει;
    B: αλά, εσύ;

    Romanization:

    A: Ti léi?
    B: Kalá, esí?

    Translation:

    A: “How is it going?”
    B: “Good, you?”

    Literally, Τι λέει; translates as, “What does it say?” However, it’s been established as “How is it going?” and has thus become one of the most common Greek slang phrases.


    2. τέσπα

    Greek Abbreviation: τέσπα
    Full Greek Expression: τέλος πάντων
    Romanization: télos pándon
    Meaning: “Nevermind; anyway; whatever”

    This is one of many Greek internet slangs that’s basically a Greek abbreviation that emerged from the need for short and easy messaging. An example dialogue is shown below.

    Greek:

    A: Θα έρθεις αύριο;
    B: Δυστυχώς δεν μπορώ.
    A: Τέσπα. (Τέλος πάντων.)

    Romanization:

    A: Tha érthis ávrio?
    B: Distihós den boró.
    A: Téspa. (Télos pándon.)

    Translation:

    A: “Will you come tomorrow?”
    B: “Unfortunately, I can’t.”
    A: “Nevermind.”

    At this point, note that even if it’s written as an abbreviation, τέσπα is almost never pronounced this way out loud. When reading a text or a message, it’s pronounced as its full version: τέλος πάντων.


    3. αναπ

    Greek Abbreviation: αναπ
    Full Greek Expression: αναπάντητη (κλήση)
    Romanization: anapánditi (klísi)
    Meaning: “Missed (call)”

    A Phone with Icons on Top of it

    During the decade of the 2000s, mobile phones began to spread around Greece. Of course, using a mobile phone requires an SIM card, which is offered by a telecommunications company.

    There are two choices: You can either sign a contract and pay a monthly bill, based on the total duration of your calls, or load the SIM card with a specific amount of money, which corresponds to a specific duration of calling time.

    Back then, signing a contract was quite expensive, so most people preferred the latter option. Therefore, once somebody had only a few calling minutes left, an outgoing unanswered call was widely used, as part of everyday communication with a pre-arranged meaning.

    Sounds too complicated? Let’s have a look at an example dialogue.

    Greek:

    A: Να περάσω να σε πάρω;
    B: Ναι, ευχαριστώ.
    A: Δεν έχω πολύ χρόνο ομιλίας. Θα σου κάνω αναπ για να βγεις έξω.
    B: ΟΚ.

    Romanization:

    A: Na peráso na se páro?
    B: Ne, efharistó.
    A: Den ého polí hróno omilías. Tha su káno anap ya na vyis éxo.
    B: Okéi.

    Translation:

    A: “Should I come over to pick you up?”
    B: “Yes, thank you.”
    A: “I don’t have much calling time left. I will ring you (implying once) so you can come out.”
    B: “OK.”

    As shown in the above dialogue, the individuals have arranged that the unanswered call will mean that the other person should come out. Similarly, this can be used in a wide variety of situations and it’s still used today.


    4. μνμ

    Greek Abbreviation: μνμ
    Full Greek Expression: μήνυμα
    Romanization: mínima
    Meaning: “Message”

    Texting Through the Phone

    A popular Greek slang in social media, this is another Greek abbreviation which is used in messaging. It represents the word μήνυμα and it’s created by using the consonants of the word only, thus leading to μνμ. Here’s an example of how to use it:

    Greek:

    A: Σου έστειλα ένα μνμ χθες. Γιατί δεν απάντησες;
    B: Δεν το είδα.
    A: Α, οκ.

    Romanization:

    A: Su éstila éna mnm (mínima) hthes. Yatí den apándises?
    B: Den to ída.
    A: A, okéi.

    Translation:

    A: “I sent you a message yesterday. Why didn’t you answer?”
    B: “I didn’t see it.”
    A: “Oh, ok.”


    5. ασαπ

    Greek Abbreviation: ασαπ
    Full Greek Expression: - not applicable -
    Romanization: asap
    Meaning: “ASAP” (As Soon As Possible)

    One of the most commonly used Greek text slang in social media and texting, this is a Greek slang word which is…not that much Greek. It derives from the English abbreviation “ASAP,” which means “as soon as possible.” It’s just written with Greek characters, and has the same meaning.

    Greek:

    A: Θα έρθεις αύριο;
    B: Δεν ξέρω. Θα σου πω ασαπ.

    Romanization:

    A: Tha érthis ávrio?
    B: Den kséro. Tha su po asap.

    Translation:

    A: Will you come tomorrow?
    B: I don’t know. I will let you know ASAP.


    6. τπτ

    Greek Abbreviation: τπτ
    Full Greek Expression: τίποτα
    Romanization: típota
    Meaning: “Nothing”

    A common Greek slang in text messages is Τπτ, which is a Greek abbreviation of the word τίποτα, meaning “nothing.” Let’s have a look at how it can be used in everyday messaging.

    Greek:

    A: Τι θα κάνεις αύριο;
    B: Τπτ. Θες να βγούμε έξω για ένα ποτό;

    Romanization:

    A: Ti tha kánis ávrio?
    B: Tpt (Típota). Thes na vgúme éxo ya éna potó?

    Translation:

    A: “What are you doing tomorrow?”
    B: “Nothing. Do you want to go out for a drink?”


    7. λολ

    Greek Abbreviation: λολ
    Full Greek Expression: - not applicable -
    Romanization: lol
    Meaning: “lol” or “laughing out loud”

    A Graphic Compilation of Internet Slang Words

    This is another slang word which has been integrated into the Greek language from English. It’s just the abbreviation “lol,” meaning “laughing out loud,” written in Greek characters and with the same meaning.

    Greek:

    A: Χα χα! Τι αστείο που ήταν αυτό που είπες!
    B: Λολ!

    Romanization:

    A: Ha ha! Ti astío pu ítan aftó pu ípes!
    B: Lol!

    Translation:

    A: “Haha! What you’ve said was hilarious!”
    B: “Lol!”


    8. γτ

    Greek Abbreviation: γτ
    Full Greek Expression: γιατί
    Romanization: yatí
    Meaning: “Why/Because”

    This is just another case of a common Greek slang word, which is used in everyday communications. The same idea of using only its consonants applies here. This way, γιατί becomes γτ, meaning either “why” or “because,” based on the context.

    Greek:

    A: Δεν είναι καλή ημέρα για μπάνιο στη θάλασσα σήμερα.
    B: Γτ το λες αυτό;
    A: Επειδή φυσάει πολύ.

    Romanization:

    A: Den íne kalí iméra ya bánio sti thálasa símera.
    B: Yt (Yatí) to les aftó?
    A: Epidí fisái polí.

    Translation:

    A: “It’s not a good day today to go swimming in the sea.”
    B: “Why do you say that?”
    A: “Because it’s very windy.”


    9. ΣΚ

    Greek Abbreviation: ΣΚ
    Full Greek Expression: Σαββατοκύριακο
    Romanization: Savatokíriako
    Meaning: “Weekend”

    Part of a Calendar Demonstrating a Weekend

    This slang word is a Greek abbreviation which derives from the Greek compound word Σαββατοκύριακο, which translates as “weekend.” It consists of two words: Σάββατο (Sávato) meaning “Saturday” and Κυριακή (Kiriakí) meaning “Sunday.” So, ΣΚ represents the initials of these two words.

    Greek:

    A: Πότε θα έχεις λίγο χρόνο να μιλήσουμε;
    B: Αυτό το ΣΚ.

    Romanization:

    A: Póte tha éhis lígo hróno na milísume?
    B: Aftó to SK (Savatokíriako).

    Translation:

    A: “When will you have some time to talk?”
    B: “This weekend.”


    10. φλκ

    Greek Abbreviation: φλκ
    Full Greek Expression: φιλάκια
    Romanization: filákia
    Meaning: “Kisses”

    Sending some virtual kisses is a sign of affection and politeness. Only the consonants are used again, and therefore φιλάκια becomes φλκ. This word is normally used for closing a conversation among good friends or people who know each other pretty well.

    Greek:

    A: Πότε θα έχεις λίγο χρόνο να μιλήσουμε;
    B: Αυτό το σκ.
    A: Οκ. Φλκ

    Romanization:

    A: Póte tha éhis lígo hróno na milísume?
    B: Aftó to sk (savatokíriako).
    A: Okéi. Flk (filákia)

    Translation:

    A: “When will you have some time to talk?”
    B: “This weekend.”
    A: “Ok. Kisses.”


    11. δλδ

    Greek Abbreviation: δλδ
    Full Greek Expression: δηλαδή
    Romanization: diladí
    Meaning: “That is”

    For the sake of easier and quicker communication, δηλαδή has become δλδ and it’s used in order to explain something. A characteristic example is shown in the following dialogue.

    Greek:

    A: Γιατί είναι καλό να τρώμε λαχανικά;
    B: Επειδή είναι θρεπτικά.
    A: Τι σημαίνει αυτό;
    B: Είναι θρεπτικά, δλδ έχουν πολλές βιταμίνες.

    Romanization:

    A: Yatí íne kaló na tróme lahaniká?
    B: Epidí íne threptiká.
    A: Ti siméni aftó?
    B: Íne threptiká, dld (diladí) éhoun polés vitamínes.

    Translation:

    A: “Why is it good to eat vegetables?”
    B: “Because they are nutritious.”
    A: “What does this mean?”
    B: “They are nutritious, that is, they contain many vitamins.”


    Conclusion

    We hope you enjoyed this lesson on Greek words and internet slang! These Greek phrases and text slang will help you sound more fluent and add some flair to your Greek communication skills.

    Greek slang words might easily confuse Greek language learners. However, we’re sure that you’re now a little bit more confident, aren’t you?

    At GreekPod101.com, we aim to provide you with everything you need to know about the Greek language in a fun and interesting way. Articles like this one, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos are waiting for you to discover them! And if you prefer a one-on-one learning experience, you can use our My Teacher Messenger before heading over to our online community to discuss lessons with other students.

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    Learning Greek through Movies: Fun & Easy!

    Learning a new language can always be a challenge. However, watching movies can certainly help you learn Greek in an easy and fun way. Develop your listening skills and get to know Greek customs and culture through Greek cinematography.

    From comedies to dramas, and modern situations to historical ones, Greek movies demonstrate a wide variety of genres and we’re sure you’ll find a movie of your taste.

    In this blog, we’re presenting some of the most popular Greek movies and quotes, aiming to encourage you to combine learning with entertainment. Our recommended Greek movies should help you do that without a hitch! Here are some tips to improve your pronunciation while watching movies in Greek.

    Ways to improve pronunciation

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    Table of Contents

    1. A Touch of Spice
    2. What if…
    3. The Island 1 & 2
    4. Little England
    5. 5 More Minutes
    6. The Bachelor I & II
    7. Brides
    8. Perfect Strangers
    9. A Bee in August
    10. Worlds Apart
    11. How Can Watching Greek Movies Help You Improve Your Greek?

    Movie genres

    1. A Touch of Spice (2003)

    • Greek Title: Πολίτικη κουζίνα
    • Romanization: Polítiki kuzína
    • English Title: “A Touch of Spice”

    A touch of spice poster

    This is an experiential film by Tassos Boulmetis, who is also the director. Tassos was born and raised in Constantinople (Istanbul) and narrates the issue of the prosecution of Greeks by the Turkish authorities in 1964. During this period, many Greeks were forced to leave their homes in Constantinople and move to Greece.

    A Touch of Spice approaches this dramatic situation through traditional cooking and sets the family dinner as the glue that keeps the family together, no matter how harsh the circumstances are. So, get ready for a unique experience enhanced with emblematic music.

    • Greek quote: Η ζωή μας, για να νοστιμήσει, θέλει αλάτι.
    • Romanization: I zoí mas, ya na nostimísi, théli aláti.
    • Meaning: “Our life needs some salt in order to become more ‘tasty.’” (Tasty meaning “interesting”).

    2. What if…. (2012)

      Greek Title: Αν…
      Romanization: An…
      English Title: “What if…”

    What if poster

    Have you ever wondered what could have happened differently in your life if you had made different choices? Then this is definitely the movie for you. Meet Dimitris, a confirmed bachelor and his dog named Lonesome. Follow him in this adventure of parallel stories and remember…each and every little decision we make might seriously influence certain aspects of the future or even our whole life. The film is set in Athens, Greece during the years of the extended economic recession.

    • Greek quote: Αν σε γνώριζα, όλα θα ήταν αλλιώς…
    • Romanization: An se gnóriza, óla tha ítan alliós…
    • Meaning: “If I knew you, everything would be different…”

    3. The Island 1 & 2 (2009, 2011)

    • Greek Title: Νήσος
    • Romanization: Nísos
    • English Title: “The Island”

    This is a modern Greek comedy set on a Greek island. During this film, you’ll get close to the small island community centered around its most important figures: the mayor, the priest, the policeman, and the teacher. When a wealthy villager dies, his will includes the donation of a huge amount of money to various functional units of the village. However, in order to receive the money, certain terms and conditions should be met, which perplex everyone and reveal even the deepest secrets. The film was shot on the picturesque island of Sifnos, thus offering great views and scenery.

    • Greek quote: Όλον αυτόν τον καιρό το νησί μιλά για εμάς τους τέσσερις.
    • Romanization: Ólon aftón ton keró to nisí milá ya emás tus téseris.
    • Meaning: “During all this time, the whole island is talking about us four.”

    4. Little England (2013)

    • Greek Title: Μικρά Αγγλία
    • Romanization: Mikrá Anglía
    • English Title: “Little England”

    Little england poster

    This is a Greek drama film of an unfulfilled love set on the small island of Andros at the beginning of the twentieth century. Greeks were famous for being great sailors, so many islanders chose this location in order to be able to provide for their families. Women of course were left behind to take care of their children, while their husbands were working on ships. This film focuses on a family consisting of two sisters, Orsa and Moscha. Will love lead the two sisters into conflict? How is the family balance affected? Get lost in this passionate film and find out.

    • Greek quote: Ευλογημένοι όσοι αγαπούν και αγαπιούνται τρελά.
    • Romanization: Evloyiméni ósi agapún ke agapiúnde trelá.
    • Meaning: “Blessed are those who love and are being madly loved in return.”

    5. 5 More Minutes (2006)

    • Greek Title: 5 λεπτά ακόμα
    • Romanization: 5 leptá akóma
    • English Title: “5 More Minutes”

    Tasos is madly in love with Alice until…he dies! However, “till death do us part” doesn’t make any sense to him, as even after death nothing about his feelings has changed. After reaching the Beyond, he is granted with five more minutes to use on Earth as he sees fit. This is a great Greek comedy, which you’ll certainly enjoy.

    • Greek quote: Τυφλώθηκες από τη ζήλεια σου.
    • Romanization: Tiflóthikes apó ti zília su.
    • Meaning: “You were blinded by your jealousy.”

    6. The Bachelor I & II (2016, 2017)

    Despite her father’s intense objections, the daughter of a famous heart surgeon is ready to marry the young grave digger she’s in love with. Having absolute trust in him, she arranges a bachelor party with his three childhood friends. This could be thought of as a similar Greek version of The Hangover movie, showcasing hilarious moments of similar caliber.

    • Greek quote: Παντρεύεται ο Αντώνης.
    • Romanization: Pandrévete o Andónis.
    • Meaning: “Antonis is getting married.”

    7. Brides (2004)

    • Greek Title: Νύφες
    • Romanization: Nífes
    • English Title: “Brides”

    Brides poster

    This story is set in 1922 in Smyrni (Izmir), after the disaster of Asia Minor. This Greek drama film focuses on the story of a mail-order bride, specifically one of the seven-hundred sailing to America. Sending brides abroad was perceived as a chance for a better life, for both the girl and her family. The film approaches this storyline in an elegant yet shocking way. Young women are basically sent to their future husbands abroad, who get to know each other only through a photo and a letter. This is a clearly dramatic situation, but will love arise? Watch this film starring Damian Lewis amongst others, enjoy, and find out how this all unfolds.

    • Greek quote: Έχεις τόσο όμορφα μάτια!
    • Romanization: Éhis tóso ómorfa mátia!
    • Meaning: “You have such beautiful eyes!”

    8. Perfect Strangers (2016)

    • Greek Title: Τέλειοι ξένοι
    • Romanization: Télii xéni
    • English Title: “Perfect Strangers”

    Once seven friends meet up for dinner during a full moon on Friday night, they decide to play a game: Placing their mobile phones on the table and reading out loud each text or message they receive, as well as taking each call they receive on speakerphone. As a result, deep secrets are revealed, which shake their lives and threaten their relationships. This film is based on the Italian movie Perfetti Sconosciuti, including significant adjustments in order to integrate Greek customs and culture.

    • Greek quote: Τι μυστικά να έχουμε; Γνωριζόμαστε όλοι πλέον πάρα πολύ καλά.
    • Romanization: Ti mistiká na éhume? Gnorizómaste óli pléon pára polí kalá.
    • Meaning: “What secrets could we possibly have? We all know each other really well already.”

    9. Α Bee in August (2007)

    • Greek Title: Μια μέλισσα τον Αύγουστο
    • Romanization: Mia mélissa ton Ávgusto
    • English Title: “A Bee in August”

    Set on a secluded beach accessible only by boat, four friends are having fun by the sea. However, this is a strange combination of people, as the group consists of Haris, his wife, his mistress, and his half-German sister. By the time Haris gets stung by a bee, he realizes he’s allergic and everyone is trying to find a solution. A Bee in August was shot on a secluded beach in Halkidiki, Northern Greece and is a must-see Greek comedy film.

    • Greek quote: Σε τσίμπησε μια μέλισσα, αυτό είναι όλο, τέλος.
    • Romanization: Se tsímbise mia mélissa, aftó íne ólo, télos.
    • Meaning: “You got stung by a bee, that’s it, the end.”

    10. Worlds Apart (2015)

    • Greek Title: Ένας άλλος κόσμος
    • Romanization: Énas álos kózmos
    • English Title: “Worlds Apart”

    Worlds apart poster

    This Greek romantic drama film is composed of three parallel stories which take place in Athens, Greece, during the years of economic recession. Racism, unemployment, love, and passion are combined in order to create a clear view of contemporary Greece. Three mini stories, centered around three different generations of Greeks create a romantic drama to remember, for sure.

    • Greek quote: Μην μπερδεύεις τη γερμανική πολιτική με τον γερμανικό λαό.
    • Romanization: Min berdévis ti yermanikí politikí me ton yermanikó laó.
    • Meaning: “Don’t confuse German politics with German people.”


    11. How Can Watching Greek Movies Help You Improve Your Greek?

    Watching Greek movies is a great way for you to improve your Greek, especially your listening and speaking skills. In addition, these films aren’t usually created for Greek language learners; they’re made for native Greek speakers. So, the language used is exactly how you hear it in real life—it’s spoken quickly and sometimes you come across different accents, idioms, and colloquialisms.

    However, you can never fully understand a language until you get to know its cultural background. Films also work exceptionally in this way, as you can see how people live in Greece now, as well as in the past. Indeed, this might be the most magical part of learning—understanding a new way of life, including customs and cultural characteristics.

    GreekPod101.com is here to point out quality Greek movies for you, which can really help you reach your language learning goals. Stay tuned for more inspirational articles and useful lists. In the meantime, enjoy watching some of the all-time greatest Greek movies!

    Start with a bonus, and download the Must-Know Beginner Vocabulary PDF for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    10 Popular Greek TV Shows for Greek Learning

    Watching Greek series can really help you learn the language, or just freshen up your Greek. Especially when talking about some of the best Greek TV shows of all time! GreekPod101.com presents you with ten of the most popular Greek TV series, which can help you learn Greek in a fun and interesting way.

    Greek TV shows can be found on various sources:

    • Websites and Web TV pages of Greek channels
    • YouTube
    • Greek Satellite TV
    • DVDs

    The easiest way is searching for each title on Google; this way, you can find almost anything.

    So, what are you waiting for? Browse through our selected series and find the one that suits your taste. We’re sure you’ll find one you like from our picks of the most popular Greek TV series, whether you find Greek TV shows online or Greek TV shows on Netflix. Let’s get started!

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    Table of Contents

    1. Είσαι το ταίρι μου (Íse to téri mu) — You are My Soulmate | (2001-2002)
    2. Εγκλήματα (Englímata) — Crimes | (1998-2000)
    3. Πενήντα-Πενήντα (Penínda-Penínda) — Fifty-Fifty | (2005-2011)
    4. Σαββατογεννημένες (Savatoyeniménes) — The Saturday-born Women | (2003-2004)
    5. Το καφέ της χαράς (To kafé tis harás) — Hara’s Cafe | (2003-2006)
    6. Κωνσταντίνου και Ελένης (Konstandínu ke Elénis) — Konstantinos’ and Eleni’s | (1998-2000)
    7. Το νησί (To nisí) — The Island | (2010-2011)
    8. Δύο Ξένοι (Dío Xéni) — Two Strangers | (1997-1999)
    9. Οι στάβλοι της Εριέτας Ζαΐμη (I stávli tis Eriétas Zaími) — The Stables of Erieta Zaimi | (2002-2004)
    10. Στο παρά πέντε (Sto pará pénde)- “In the Nick of Time” | (2005-2007)
    11. Conclusion


    1. Είσαι το ταίρι μου (Íse to téri mu) — You are My Soulmate | (2001-2002)

    Stella is an overweight Greek woman residing in Melbourne, Australia. Vicky is also a Greek living in Melbourne; however, she is a beautiful model.

    Once Vicky gets engaged to Nikos, she’s off to Greece to meet his parents. On the plane to get there, she discovers that she’s traveling along with her friend, Stella. Then, an extraordinary thought pops into her mind, while being extremely stressed about meeting Niko’s parents: What if they switched places?

    A series of unexpected and hilarious events follow.

    This is an all-time favorite series for many people in Greece. It includes the concepts of love, hate, discrimination, immigration, and more, as you get to know a classic Greek family and their perceptions. Unique characters and an intriguing, humorous story set the perfect basis for success.

    The language used is simple and without many idioms or strange accents. As a result, this is definitely a great Greek television series to watch while studying the language.

    Quote

    • Greek: Η ζωή είναι τελικά μια τεράστια πλάκα
    • Romanization: I zoí íne teliká mía terástia pláka.
    • Translation: “In the bottom line, life is a huge joke.”


    2. Εγκλήματα (Englímata) — Crimes | (1998-2000)

    Look at them! They seem like a group of happy friends, but…they’re not! This is another comedy series, which is popular to this day. When Alekos, a married man, falls in love with Flora, who’s also married, a series of perplexed events take place.

    The story is centered around his wife, Sosó, who discovers the cheating and is determined to kill him. Doesn’t sound much like a comedy, right? This series is a great mix of black humor, hilarious moments, and well-presented characters.

    Again, in this series, simple language is used, so this is perfect for freshening up your Greek and having fun at the same time! As one of the most popular Greek TV series, we’re sure you’ll love it!

    Quote

    • Greek: Δε θα μου πεις εσύ πότε είναι η ώρα μου, εγώ θα σου πω πότε είναι η δική σου!
    • Romanization: De tha mu pis esí póte íne i óra mu, egó tha su po póte íne i dikí su!
    • Translation: “You are not the one to tell me when it’s my time to die, I will tell you when it’s yours!”


    3. Πενήντα-Πενήντα (Penínda-Penínda) — Fifty-Fifty | (2005-2011)

    This may be one of the Greek TV shows most recently viewed.

    This comedy series is centered around the life of three couples. These are Nikiforos and Elisavet, Mimis and Xanthipi, and Pavlos and Irini. Things get hilariously perplexed when Pavlos begins an extramarital relationship with a young gymnast, Maria. In addition, the series also includes the relationships and interactions of these couples’ children.

    This is a typical and quite popular Greek TV series, which unfortunately was left unfinished, due to the bankruptcy of the Greek channel “Mega,” which was responsible for its production.


    4. Σαββατογεννημένες (Savatoyeniménes) — The Saturday-born Women | (2003-2004)

    The title of this Greek series refers to a Greek superstition. It’s believed that whoever is born on a Saturday is lucky and always get what they wish for. So if they wish for something, it will happen and that’s why they are considered lucky. If they wish someone harm, like a curse, it will also happen. So sometimes people born on a Saturday warn others to not mess with them because of that!

    Savvas is a rude, foul-mouthed, macho and misogynist womanizer. Therefore, he has been married three times.

    The title of the series refers to his three ex-wives Súla, Kéti, and Bía. When Savvas discovers while driving that he’s the lottery winner of 7.5-million euros, he’s involved in an accident which temporarily erases his memory. Having no one to care for him after the accident, his three ex-wives take pity on him and decide to help him recover.

    What will happen when they find out he’s the big winner of the Joker lottery? Watch this purely comedic series and find out!

    This is a pretty fun series to watch. However, fast speech is used as well as many idioms and slang words, mainly because one of the main characters (José) is an immigrant from Paraguay who strives to learn Greek.

    Quote

    • Greek: Κέρδισε 7.5 εκατομμύρια στο Τζόκερ.
    • Romanization: Kérdise eptámisi ekatomíria sto Jóker.
    • Translation: “He won 7.5 million (Euros) in Joker.” (similar to the American Powerball)


    5. Το καφέ της χαράς (To kafé tis harás) — Hara’s Cafe | (2003-2006)

    In a small and untouched Greek village, lives the great mayor Periandros Popotas who’s a really strict man, is really proud about the Greek legacy, and adores tradition and culture. Hara is a successful career-woman working for an advertising company in Athens.

    Sadly, almost simultaneously, she finds herself fired and inherits a house in the aforementioned conservative village, so she decides to move there with her daughter and open a cafe. Can the dynamic city girl Hara fit in inside this reclusive community? Watch and find out.


    6. Κωνσταντίνου και Ελένης (Konstandínu ke Elénis) — Konstantinos’ and Eleni’s | (1998-2000)

    This is probably the most successful Greek series of all time. It has been playing in repetition for over 15 years and it’s still played occasionally on Greek television.

    Konstantinos Katakouzinos is an assistant professor of Byzantinology at the University of Athens, whereas Eleni Vlahaki is a humble waitress at a bar. They’re sharing lodgings, living together in a mansion, after a legal problem. They’re two unrelated and very opposite characters, who tend to fight each other all the time.

    This Greek comedy series includes many slang words and phrases, so discretion is advised.

    Quote

    • Greek: Το σπίτι είναι δικό μου!
    • Romanization: To spíti íne dikó mu!
    • Translation: “The house is mine!”


    7. Το νησί (To nisí) — The Island | (2010-2011)

    Based on the awarded book of Victoria Hislop, this story is set on Spinalonga, a small Greek island off the coast of Crete. The story focuses on a leper colony, which was established on the isolated island as a precaution measure. These people learned to live isolated from the whole world, with no doctors, doomed to suffer from this cruel disease. This is obviously a drama, which truly speaks to the soul.

    If you’re interested in how these people’s everyday life was, then this is the ultimate Greek TV show for you, especially if you plan on watching Greek drama TV series.


    8. Δύο Ξένοι (Dío Xéni) — Two Strangers | (1997-1999)

    This is a very successful Greek romantic comedy. Marina is one low-educated but ambitious young actress-hostess. When she decides to study acting she meets Konstantinos, a handsome and charming teacher of drama. However, he’s quite the opposite of her, being a well-educated and prestigious man. Their unconventional love story will certainly make you laugh and as you come to love them.

    Quote

    • Greek: Γύρνα πίσω ή έστω τηλεφώνα.
    • Romanization: Gírna píso i ésto tilefóna.
    • Translation: “Come back or at least give me a call.”


    9. Οι στάβλοι της Εριέτας Ζαΐμη (I stávli tis Eriétas Zaími) — The Stables of Erieta Zaimi | (2002-2004)

    Set in a Greek female prison, this comedy has a unique concept. Sit back, relax, and watch the stories the prisoners unveil trying not to laugh out loud. When the charming male manager of the prison falls in love with one of the female prisoners, an interesting story begins.

    This series uses many slang words and phrases, so discretion is advised.


    10. Στο παρά πέντε (Sto pará pénde)- “In the Nick of Time” | (2005-2007)

    This is a mystery-comedy-drama series, which revolves around five basic characters, who are initially unrelated. However, when they get trapped in a malfunctioning elevator, witnessing the death of a former minister, their fates are intertwined. Before passing away, the former minister mumbles, “Find the one who did this to me,” and so the adventure begins!

    This is a more contemporary Greek comedy, which is quite popular in Greece. The smart scenario and the totally different characters create a series to remember. If you’re into mystery, but can’t stand too much “darkness,” this is the series for you! Based on who you ask, this could be considered one of the most popular Greek soap operas.

    Quote

    • Greek: Για όλα φταίει η κοντή!
    • Romanization: Ya óla ftéi i kondí.
    • Translation: “It’s all the short woman’s fault!”


    11. Conclusion

    You might have noticed that most of these emblematic Greek series were produced before 2010. This is not something random, as the years after 2010 were really harsh on TV programs. By 2011, Greece was already deep into the worst economic recession of modern times. As a result, there were many cuts in the TV productions’ budgets and Greek channels preferred to buy the copyrights and show low-cost Turkish TV shows, instead of producing original Greek series.

    However, today all these TV shows have been digitized and are available through the development of technology and the world wide web. GreekPod101.com suggests watching the most popular TV shows of all time, as a fun and effective way to learn Greek. Do you want to learn more fun ways to effectively learn Greek?

    At GreekPod101.com, we aim to provide you with everything you need to know about the Greek language in a fun and interesting way. Articles like this one, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos are waiting for you to discover them!

    Also keep in mind that by utilizing our MyTeacher feature, you’ll gain access to one-on-one help as you learn the Greek language. You don’t want to miss out on this opportunity!

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    Protomagia: Labor Day in Greece

    May Day (otherwise known as Labor Day, or Labor Day weekend in some places) has its roots in antiquity.

    Back then, the Greeks, as well as many other people of Europe, celebrated the final victory of spring against winter, something that would bring fertility and life to nature and, by extension, to humans.

    The word “May” itself is believed to have originated from the Roman goddess Maia, who took her name from Maia, one of the Pleiades. The word maia back then meant wet nurse and mother. The celebrations of antiquity were, of course, altered over time, but they survive today as simple folk traditions.

    Taking this historical context and examining it in light of more recent events and current traditions, you’ll uncover so much about Greece’s culture. Let GreekPod101.com show you everything you need to know about May 1 Day in Greece!

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    1. What is Labor Day?

    May 1, otherwise known as Protomayá (”May Day”), is a holiday dedicated to spring and the flowers. It’s also called International Workers’ Day in memory of the uprising of the workers of Chicago on May 1886, who were demanding an eight-hour working schedule and better working conditions.

    For the labor unions, this is a day to strike, while for the rest it’s simply a public holiday. Thus, Labor Day’s meaning varies based on who you ask and who’s celebrating. Regardless, May Day in Greece is a day of historical significance and modern-day fun.

    2. When is Labor Day?

    The First of May

    Each year, May 1st Day is celebrated on—May 1st! The perfect time of year to collect Greek flowers and observe the following Greek customs for May Day.

    3. How is Labor Day Celebrated?

    People Leaping Through Fire

    How is May 1 celebrated in Greece? Read the Greek text below (and find the English translation directly below it) to learn about Greek customs during Protomagia.

    Στην Ελλάδα το πιο γνωστό έθιμο της Πρωτομαγιάς είναι το πρωτομαγιάτικο στεφάνι. Πολλοί εκμεταλλεύονται την αργία και πηγαίνουν εκδρομές στην ύπαιθρο για να μαζέψουν αγριολούλουδα και πρασινάδες, που θα πλέξουν σε στεφάνι και θα κρεμάσουν στις πόρτες τους απ’ έξω. Το έθιμο αυτό φέρνει τους ανθρώπους πιο κοντά στη φύση, ακόμα και όσους ζουν στις πόλεις. Το στεφάνι ξεραίνεται και παραμένει στις πόρτες ως τη γιορτή του Αϊ-Γιαννιού, όπου στην επαρχία το καίνε στις φωτιές που ανάβουν.

    Σε πολλές περιοχές ο Μάης ενσαρκώνεται στο «Μαγιόπουλο». Στο έθιμο αυτό ένα παιδί στολισμένο με λουλούδια τριγυρνάει στους δρόμους του χωριού μαζί με συνοδεία, και όλοι χορεύουν και τραγουδάνε τραγούδια για τον Μάη. Στη Ναύπακτο το Μαγιόπουλο συνοδεύεται από γέρους φουστανελάδες που κρατούν κουδούνια στολισμένα με ανθισμένη ιτιά. Το έθιμο αυτό, με ελάχιστες παραλλαγές, λέγεται «πιπεριά» στη βόρεια Εύβοια. Από τα χαράματα οι νέες του χωριού σκεπάζουν το σώμα μιας λυγερόκορμης κοπέλας με λουλούδια και φτέρες. Της κρεμάνε και ένα κουδούνι και αυτή είναι… η «πιπεριά».

    Σε μερικά μέρη όλοι καταβρέχουν την «πιπεριά» και τραγουδάνε παρακαλώντας για βροχή, ενώ εκείνη υποκλίνεται σε όσους τη ραντίζουν. Λένε πως πολλές φορές μετά το γύρισμα της «πιπεριάς» στους δρόμους του χωριού, βρέχει!

    In Greece, the most well-known tradition of May Day is the May Day wreath. Many people take advantage of this holiday and go on field trips in the countryside to collect wild flowers and greenery, which they will then weave into a wreath that they hang outside their doors. This tradition brings people closer to nature, even those who live in the cities. The wreath dries up and remains on the doors until the celebration of St. John, where in the province it is burned in the fires that people ignite.

    In many regions, May is personified with the May child. In this tradition, a child decorated with flowers wanders around the streets of the village with some escorts, and everyone dances and sings songs about May. In Nafpaktos, the May child is accompanied by elderly men who wear fustanela skirts and hold bells decorated with willow tree blossoms. This tradition, with a few variations, is called piperiá (”pepper tree̶ ;) in north Euboea. From the crack of dawn, the young girls of the village cover the body of a tall and beautiful young girl with flowers and ferns. They also hang a bell on her, making her piperiá.

    In some places, everyone hoses down piperiá and sings pleas for rain, while she bows to those who sprinkle her. It’s said that very often after the stroll of piperiá on the streets of the village, it rains!

    4. Additional Information

    Do you know when the first May Day protest in Greece was?

    It was in 1892 from the Central Socialist Association of Kallergis. Then another one followed the year after, with over 2,000 workers demanding an eight-hour working schedule, Sunday as a day off, and public health insurance for the victims of labor accidents. Nowadays on Protomagia, Greece holds protests, with the largest ones being in the center of Athens.

    5. Must-know Vocab

    Single White Flower

    Here’s some vocabulary you should know for May 1st Day in Greece!

    • Εργάτης (ergátis) — “worker”
    • Άνοιξη (ánixi) — “spring”
    • Μάιος (Máios) — “May”
    • Λουλούδι (lulúdi) — “flower”
    • Αργία (aryía) — “holiday”
    • εργατική Πρωτομαγιά (ergatikí Protomayá) — “Labor Day”
    • Εργαζόμενος (ergazómenos) — “employee”
    • εργατική επανάσταση (ergatikí epanástasi) — “workers’ revolution”
    • Επανάσταση (epanástasi) — “revolution”
    • πρωτομαγιάτικο στεφάνι (protomayiátiko stefáni) — “May 1st Day wreath”
    • Πρωτομαγιά (Protomayá) — “May 1st Day”
    • φτιάχνω στεφάνι (ftiáhno stefáni) — “make wreath”
    • Μαγιόξυλο (mayóxilo) — “cypress branch used on May 1st Day”
    • εργατικό σωματείο (ergatikó somatío) — “labor union”
    • το πήδημα της φωτιάς (to pídima tis fotiás) — “leaping through fire”
    • Προλεταριάτο (proletariáto) — “proletariat”
    • αμίλητο νερό (amílito neró) — “silent water”
    • εργατική τάξη (ergatikí táxi) — “working class”
    • Απεργία (aperyía) — “strike”

    To hear the pronunciation of each word, check out our May 1st Day vocabulary list, where you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio file of its pronunciation.

    Conclusion

    As you can see, May 1 is a day of great celebration across Greece, both rooted in history and blossoming in light of the modern world. What do you think about Greece’s celebration of May 1? Does your country have similar (or very different) celebrations? Let us know in the comments!

    To learn more about the culture of Greece and the Greek language, visit us at GreekPod101.com. We offer many tools to aid you in your language-learning journey, such insightful blog posts, an online community forum, and free vocabulary lists to expand your inner dictionary! You can also take advantage of our MyTeacher program to learn Greek with your own personal teacher.

    Know that your studying and practice will pay off, and you’ll soon be speaking Greek—and talking about its culture—like a native! Best wishes in your language-learning journey!

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    How to Find a Job in Greece: Tips & Everything You Need to Know

    230 days of sunshine, more than 200 scenic, inhabited islands, welcoming faces of people, and a relaxed lifestyle. Sounds great, right? Well, you’ll be able to experience all of these and even more if you decide to find a job in Greece and stay for an extended period of time.

    Although Greece has gone through a vast economic recession, now it’s time for the country to flourish again. The government aims to encourage private investments and the demand for specialized employees has increased due to brain drain.

    In this article, GreekPod101.com will share with you everything you need to know about finding a job in Greece. Here are some useful tips and inside information, in order to get you ready for an amazing life experience. Once you’ve found out more about jobs in Greece for English speakers and how to get them, you’ll be all set. So let’s get started.

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    Without further ado, here’s our guide on how to find a job in Japan.

    Table of Contents

    1. How to Search for a Job in Greece
    2. Popular Job Categories for Foreigners in Greece
    3. Skills and Other Requirements
    4. Conclusion

    1. How to Search for a Job in Greece

    Holding a Red Pen

    When it comes to searching for a job in Greece, there are plenty of choices. Ten to twenty years ago, the best way to land a job in Greece was by searching through job ads published in local newspapers. Although there are still newspapers publishing job ads, the game has been shifted towards job hunting through the Internet. In this section, we’ll present you with the most popular ways to find yourself some job opportunities so that you can begin working in Greece.

    1- Finding a Job through Online Ads

    There’s a wide variety of international, as well as local, websites where you can browse through job ads. All of them are keyword-based, which means you’ll have to enter a keyword related to the job you’re looking for and search through the results. Other filters are also available such as region, years of experience, etc.. So without further ado, here are some of the top Greek job hunting websites.

    Xe.gr
    “Xe” stands for “Χρυσή Ευκαιρία (Hrisí Efkería)” which is translated in English to “Golden Opportunity.” Xe.gr is a popular choice amongst employers, as well as candidates. On this website you can find a wide variety of job ads for positions throughout Greece. Currently it’s only available in Greek; however, they plan on offering English content soon.

    • Pros: A popular website in Greece with many job ads throughout the country.
    • Cons: Only available in Greek at the moment.

    Indeed.com
    Indeed is a leader in job hunting and it recently entered the Greek labor market. The user can browse through various job ads and a build-your-own-CV feature is also available. In addition, the CV can be sent directly to the company through the website.

    • Pros: Easy to use and available in a variety of languages.
    • Cons: Not very popular in Greece. If you know Greek at an advanced level, you’ll find the Greek version a bit odd. Localization didn’t go so well on that one.

    Kariera.gr
    Καριέρα (Kariéra) in Greek is “Career” in English. This is a really popular website for finding job opportunities in Greece. Many national, as well as international, organizations based in Greece prefer posting their vacancies on this website. This website also supports creating and sending a CV directly to the company.

    • Pros: Wide variety of job opportunities, mainly from large companies and organizations. Some ads are in English.
    • Cons: Only available in Greek. Not many blue collar jobs available.

    Skywalker.gr
    This website is a member of the group The Network, a worldwide organization which has created 37 local websites in 37 different countries. Each website is well-adjusted to the characteristics of different labor markets, offering a fully localized experience. For example, while offering job advertisements through the Greek website, skywalker.gr also periodically publishes a newspaper—often inserted into popular national newspapers—in order to facilitate individuals who don’t have access to electronic services, or who prefer the old, traditional way of job hunting in Greece.

    • Pros: Wide variety of job opportunities, mainly from large companies and organizations.
    • Cons: Only available in Greek.

    Careerjet.gr
    Careerjet is a popular search engine for jobs. This website gathers job ads from many different websites. Its search engine nature provides an easy way to find a job, as it grants you access to a selection of websites and companies looking to hire new personnel.

    • Pros: A wide variety of sources.
    • Cons: Only available in Greek.

    2- Finding a Job in Greece through Recruitment Companies

    This isn’t a very popular way to find a job in Greece amongst locals, though you can still give it a try. Just send your CV to a recruitment company with activity in Greece, and who knows? You might be able to find the job of your dreams. Most recruitment companies in Greece also offer selected job ads on their websites.

    A huge advantage of recruitment companies is that they can inform you about everything related to your new life in Greece. They often take care of any paperwork needed, as well. Contacting a recruitment company can also be beneficial if you don’t speak Greek at a conversational level, as it functions as a mediator between the candidate and the company.

    The following are some recruitment companies in Greece:

    3- Finding a Job in Greece through LinkedIn

    LinkedIn is the number one professional networking website in the world. For those who aren’t familiar with this special social network, the user is able to build a professional profile demonstrating all the important aspects of his career, as well as his skills, achievements, and professional experience. Basically, a personal LinkedIn profile functions as an electronic Curriculum Vitae.

    However, LinkedIn also provides online job ads. Organizations, recruitment companies, and independent headhunters use this platform in order to find the most appropriate employee for a given job vacancy.

    In Greece, over the past few years, the importance of LinkedIn has been highlighted. More and more companies are using it in order to find the perfect employee or even to simply widen their search. Nevertheless, LinkedIn is merely used in order to find highly specialized personnel.

    4- Other Ways to Find a Job in Greece

    Publicize your interest in finding a job in Greece. Do you have friends or relatives in Greece? Just talk to them. Word-of-mouth personal branding is one of the most effective ways to get you the job you want. Greeks are quite communicative and helpful—it’s not a coincidence that they’re famous for their hospitality.

    Another way is to start sending your CV to companies based in Greece, that you ideally want to work for, regardless of the job ads you might find. Every well-established company will take into account a prestigious CV, even if there aren’t any vacancies at the moment.

    Last but not least, if you’re already in Greece, don’t be shy. It’s common for people looking for a job to visit shops and leave a CV just in case. You can start by strolling around your neighborhood. Who knows? A good job opportunity might be around the corner.

    2. Popular Job Categories for Foreigners in Greece

    The knowledge of a foreign language at a native speaker level has always been a huge advantage in the Greek labor market. So, which jobs are the most popular amongst foreigners in Greece?

    1- Tourism-related Jobs

    Woman Holding a Paper

    Greece is a popular tourist destination, and offering information and services in the traveller’s native language just takes customer service to another level. Therefore, the Greek tourism industry is in high need of foreign employees. There’s a huge demand for Scandinavian, Russian, German, Spanish, and Italian speakers. Indeed, knowledge of Greek is often not required, but knowledge of English, along with your native language, is totally a must.

    Tourism-related jobs are often available at the beginning of each summer season, which in Greece is pretty early, around mid-March or April, till the end of October. In addition, this category of jobs is in high demand on Greek islands and other popular tourist destinations, so many foreigners prefer them, as they combine holidays on sandy beaches with work.

    2- Teaching Jobs

    Teacher

    Another popular choice for foreigners is teaching their native language. In Greece there are many private educational organizations, where languages from all over the world are taught. In this case, a teaching degree is often needed. In addition, if you aim to teach young children, a conversational level of Greek language is almost a prerequisite. However, when it comes to teaching adults, knowledge of the English language along with your native language can also work, as adults in Greece have a really good knowledge of English. This allows you to explain everything in English.

    3- Technology-related Jobs

    Man Holding a Loptop

    Greece might be a well-developed country, but the recent economic crisis didn’t allow technology to drastically enter the everyday lives of its citizens until recently. Therefore, now, e-commerce, mobile app development, and electronic transactions have begun to flourish. This has led to an increase in the demand for technology-related professions. Foreigners have equal opportunities with locals and in many cases a knowledge of Greek isn’t mandatory.

    3. Skills and Other Requirements

    Resume

    The procedure of finding a job in Greece is pretty much the same as in any other country. In order to search for a job, a well-written CV is a must. In Greece, a Europass template is quite popular and happily accepted. A motivation (or cover) letter isn’t required most of the time, as only multinational companies based in Greece might ask for one. By the end of the selection process, the company contacts all shortlisted candidates, usually through phone, and arranges an interview.

    The interview is quite typical compared to other European countries. You might be asked to talk a little bit about yourself and your professional experience. Some large organizations or recruitment companies might put you through a skills test, which will complement the interview procedure, but there’s no standard here.

    Hopefully these Greek CV tips and interview information will help you be your best for the best job out there!

    Lastly, in order to be able to work legally in Greece, you’ll have to find an employer who will grant you with a work invitation. In this way, you can get a working VISA in Greece, which should be renewed every year. Working and living in Greece will be a breeze for you with your VISA.

    4. Conclusion

    As you can see, in Greece you can find a job even without speaking the language. Nevertheless, you’ll be able to find a better job if you do speak Greek. In addition, speaking Greek will make your stay and everyday life in Greece much easier. Start learning Greek today with GreekPod101.com and prepare yourself and the future of your career!

    You can also visit the My teacher Page, where you can get in touch with our Greek teacher, discuss your needs, and start learning Business Greek.

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    Tsiknopempti: How to Celebrate Greek Fat Thursday

    Fat Thursday is one of many Greek holidays where heavy feasting takes place. This religious Greece holiday, also called Tsiknopempti, is important for you to get to know so that you can better understand Greek culture.

    Here at GreekPod101.com, it’s our goal to help you delve deep into the Greek culture and language, both efficiently and in a fun manner. So, let’s go ahead and start learning about what Fat Thursday in Greece really looks like.

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    1. What is Fat Thursday in Greece?

    Fat Thursday, or Τσικνοπέμπτη (Tsiknopémpti), is traditionally a day where grilled meat is consumed in large quantities. If you find yourself in Greece on Fat Thursday, you won’t be able to mistake what day it is, because the smell of burning fat being roasted on grills is everywhere! The event is celebrated 59 days before Easter, or Πάσχα.

    Essentially, Fat Thursday is a “last chance” of celebration and rowdiness before Easter. This is because the Lent holiday is nearby, which is a time of fasting and abstinence from all those things which will be enjoyed on Fat Thursday.

    2. When is it?

    The date of Fat Thursday varies each year, as it depends on the date of Lent and of Easter. This Greek holiday takes place the Thursday before Lent. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years:

    • 2019: February 28
    • 2020: February 20
    • 2021: February 11
    • 2022: February 24
    • 2023: February 16
    • 2024: February 8
    • 2025: February 27
    • 2026: February 12
    • 2027: February 4
    • 2028: February 17

    3. How is it Celebrated?

    Sliced Pork

    The origin of Fat Thursday is not verified, but it’s thought that it comes from the Dionysian and bacchanal festivals of the ancient Greeks and Romans. This is why many special events are often accompanied by mocking songs, teasing, speaking in a vulgar manner, and sexual innuendo.

    1- Food: Greek Meat Dishes

    In many regions, pigs, or χοίροι, are slaughtered, while outdoor grills are set up everywhere from early in the morning, continuously churning out exquisite tidbits, or Μεζές (mezés), and traditional skewered meat.

    There is plenty of meat eating, or Κρεοφαγία (kreofayía), and wine drinking, or Οινοποσία (inoposía), on this day, as it’s the last chance for rowdiness and meat consumption before Lent, or Σαρακοστή, the period of fasting. After Fat Thursday, the next opportunity for partying doesn’t occur until Easter, a whole 59 days later, which is why Greeks put so much effort into making it an enjoyable event.

    Meats eaten on this day are cooked over charcoals, or κάρβουνα (kárvuno), which strongly emit the smell of burning fat, hence the name “Fat Thursday.”

    2- Reading Practice: Marriage

    Read the Greek text below to find out about this fun custom (you can find the English translation below it).
    —–

    Η έννοια του γάμου συναντάται σε πολλά έθιμα, όπως αυτό της «Κουλουρούς» στην Πάτρα. Η Γιαννούλα η κουλουρού ντύνεται νύφη και πηγαίνει στο λιμάνι να προϋπαντήσει τον Αμερικανό πρόεδρο Ουίλσον πιστεύοντας, λανθασμένα, πως την αγαπά και θέλει να την παντρευτεί. Ο κόσμος που τη συνοδεύει διασκεδάζει με τα καμώματά της. Στη Θήβα επίσης, την Τσικνοπέμπτη αρχίζει ο περίφημος «βλάχικος γάμος» που βασίζεται στο προξενιό δύο νέων, και ολοκληρώνεται την Καθαρά Δευτέρα. Τέλος στις Σέρρες ανάβονται μεγάλες φωτιές. Αφού ψήσουν το κρέας, οι άνθρωποι πηδούν από πάνω τους.

    —–
    The concept of marriage is found in many traditions, such as that of the Koulourou (bagel saleslady) in Patras. Giannoula, who sells bagels, dresses up as a bride and goes to the harbor to meet and welcome the American president Wilson believing, mistakenly, that he loves her and wants to marry her. The people that accompany her are being entertained with her behavior. In Thebes also, on Fat Thursday the famous Vlach wedding begins, which is based on the matchmaking of two young people, and ends on Clean Monday. Finally, in Serres, large fires are being lit. After they roast the meat, people jump over them.

    The incident of Giannoula, the bagel saleslady, did happen before the second World War. Since the prank that was played on this naive woman caused so much laughter, the show was repeated for several years, so it ended up becoming a custom.

    4. Additional Information

    Why do Greek people eat meat on Thursday, as you see in the name Fat Thursday, as opposed to other weekdays?

    For the Orthodox Church, or Ορθόδοξη Εκκλησία, the fasts of Wednesday and Friday are important. Because Thursday lies between these two days, it is considered the most suitable day for revelry.

    5. Must-know Vocab

    Triodion Book

    In order to celebrate Fat Thursday in Greece, you’re going to need to know some basic vocabulary for this holiday:

    • Χοιρινό (hirinó) — “pork”
    • Κρέας (kréas) — “meat”
    • Μουσική (musikí) — “music”
    • Σουβλάκι (suvláki) — “souvlaki
    • Τριώδιο (Triódio) — “Triodion
    • Απόκριες (apókries) — “carnival”
    • Λίπος (lípos) — “fat”
    • Κρεοφαγία (kreofayía) — “meat eating”
    • Οινοποσία (inoposía) — “wine drinking”
    • Τσίκνα (tsíkna) — “smell of burning food”
    • Υπαίθριος (ipéthrios) — “outdoor”
    • Ψησταριά (psistariá) — “grill”
    • τρικούβερτο γλέντι (trikúverto gléndi) — “high jinks”
    • Μεζές (mezés) — “tidbit”
    • Κάρβουνο (kárvuno) — “charcoal”
    • Τσικνοπέμπτη (Tsiknopémpti) — “Fat Thursday”

    To hear the pronunciation of each word, visit our Greek Fat Thursday vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find an audio of each pronunciation alongside the word.

    Conclusion

    Now you know more about how Greeks celebrate Fat Thursday. What do you think about this holiday? Does your country celebrate Fat Thursday or a similar holiday? Let us know in the comments!

    To learn more about Greek culture and the language, visit us at GreekPod101.com. We offer an array of insightful blog posts, free vocabulary lists, and an online community where you can discuss lessons with fellow Greek students. You can even download our MyTeacher app for a one-on-one learning experience with your own personal Greek teacher.

    We hope you enjoyed learning about Greek Fat Thursday with us! Stay tuned for more Greek holiday articles, and keep up the good work. You’ll be a master of the Greek language before you know it!

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