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How Long Does it Take to Learn Greek?

A Useful Guide for Beginners

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How long does it take to learn Greek? Is Greek a difficult language to master? How can I learn Greek fast?

These questions (and many more) might pass through your mind as you set out to start learning Greek. Is there a definite answer to all of them? Well, actually no. 

However, by the time you’re done reading this blog post, you’ll have a clearer understanding of what it takes to achieve the different levels of Greek fluency. You’ll also walk away with useful tips on how to learn the Greek language more effectively and speed up your progress.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Is Greek a Difficult Language?
  2. How Long Does it Take to Achieve a Beginner Level?
  3. How Long Does it Take to Achieve an Intermediate Level?
  4. How Long Does it Take to Achieve an Advanced Level?
  5. How Can I Learn Greek Faster?
  6. Conclusion

1. Is Greek a Difficult Language?

Rumor has it that Greek is difficult to learn. But does this statement correspond to reality?

A Woman Laughing and Holding a Book Over Her Head

Well, it’s not super-easy. That’s for sure.

Greek is not a Romance language, meaning it does not make use of Latin characters. Although that fact alone might intimidate new learners, the reality is more encouraging. Greek is considered a stand-alone branch of the Indo-European language family, and it has heavily influenced almost every major European language. This is mainly because modern European civilization stems from Ancient Greek civilization.  

As a result, there are many words in English (and in European Romance languages) that were originally Greek. In addition, Greece has always been in touch with other European countries, creating cultural and commercial bonds. Therefore, the Greek language also contains many originally foreign words (from French, Italian, English, etc.).

The Greek alphabet shares many common characteristics with the English alphabet, though it also includes some unique features. The similarities, however, make learning Greek even easier.

Even from a phonetic perspective, many people state that Greek sounds a bit like Spanish, Italian, or Portuguese. Therefore, it doesn’t sound that extraordinary to American and European ears. 

At this point, we should note that the difficulty you’ll have learning Greek highly depends on your mother tongue, as well. For example, some people from Asian, Arab, or African countries find it harder to adjust because their mother tongue is far more different from Greek than European languages are. 

All in all, if you’re still looking for an accurate answer here, it is: No, Greek is not that hard to learn!

Below, we’ll take a look at how long it takes to learn Greek based on the level of knowledge you’re aiming for.

2. How Long Does it Take to Achieve a Beginner Level?

Time to achieveTaking as a reference the requirements of the A1 level on the CEFR scale, you will need approximately 100-120 hours of study.
What you will learn at this levelThe learner will have the ability to communicate with native speakers at a basic level. He or she will be able to…
  • …introduce himself/herself
  • ….describe the place of his/her residence
  • ….talk about the weather….discuss hobbies and activities
  • ….describe his/her family
  • ….give and receive directions and basic phrases on how to get around the city
  • ….talk about foods and drinks.
Example lessonSpeaking Perfect Greek at a Restaurant

3. How Long Does it Take to Achieve an Intermediate Level?

Time to achieveTaking as a reference the requirements of the B1 level, you will need approximately 180-250 hours of study.
What you will learn at this levelThe learner will be able to communicate at an intermediate level, on the following subjects:

Daily transactions
  • Business
  • Travels
  • The characteristics of products
  • Methods of payment
  • Services and activities
Example lessonMaking an Appointment in Greek

4. How Long Does it Take to Achieve an Advanced Level?

Time to achieveTaking as a reference the requirements of the C1 level, you will need approximately 400-520 hours of study.
What you will learn at this levelThe learner will be able to communicate at an advanced level. This simply means that the student should be able to express his/her views on a wide variety of subjects, speaking without long disruptions and communicating effectively with public and private services for a wide variety of transactions.

In addition, at this level, the learner has gained some knowledge of the Greek culture.
Example lessonTop 10 Greek Holidays and Festivals

5. How Can I Learn Greek Faster?

A Smiling Woman Reading a Book

In the modern world, our daily routines are getting faster and faster as we try to serve many different roles throughout the day. That being said, our daily tasks often leave limited time (if any) for our hobbies, let alone learning a new language. 

Learning a new language, however, doesn’t have to take up much time within your daily schedule. The key is to find smart ways to practice—and why not even entertain yourself at the same time?

Here are a few ways to learn Greek fast: 

  • Watch Greek-Related Netflix Shows

    Although Netflix does not include much Greek-language content, there are many series and movies that are related to Greek history, mythology, or general lifestyle. These shows provide the perfect opportunity to take a step closer to the Greek culture, even if you don’t know a single word of Greek.

A Couple Watching a Movie at the Cinema
  • Watch Greek Movies

    Even if you’re not sure whether you want to pick up a new language, watching some Greek movies is the perfect way to test the waters. Greek cinematography includes movies of many genres and themes, so you’re sure to find a Greek movie that interests you.

    Tip: If you’re a complete beginner, watch the movie with English subtitles. This will familiarize you with how Greek sounds and may help you pick up some phrases. Later on, as you start learning Greek and making progress, you may switch to Greek subtitles (or no subtitles at all!).

A Happy Child Looking at a Laptop’s Screen
  • Watch Greek YouTube Channels

    Another great way to speed up your Greek learning is to watch Greek YouTube videos. These videos don’t have to be exclusively educational. There are many Greek channels covering a range of topics, from infotainment to travel and from Greek songs to famous Greek YouTubers commenting on a wide variety of subjects. One thing is for sure: You’ll be able to get yourself involved in the Greek language and culture much easier this way!

  • Read Greek Books
  • If you’re a bookworm and an intermediate Greek learner, it might be a good idea to start reading Greek books. Your options are literally endless, and you’ll be able to enhance your vocabulary quickly and easily.

    Tip: If you’re a beginner, then children’s books might be just perfect, since they use basic vocabulary and simple sentences.


A Man and a Woman Learning a New Language with Post-it Notes
  • Place Post-It Notes Around the House

    Wondering how to learn Greek vocabulary when you’re short on time? Write some Greek words and phrases on Post-It notes and place them strategically around the house—you’ll be surprised how much faster you can learn Greek this way. We tend to learn faster when we’re actively involved with the language, so what could be better than reviewing the Greek names of basic objects again and again without even noticing?

    Tip: Change the Post-It notes regularly in order to learn even more words and phrases.

  • Switch Your Smartphone’s Menu to Greek

    If you have an understanding of the basics of the Greek language, then the key to speeding up your learning progress might be as simple as switching your smartphone’s menu to Greek. This might seem annoying at first, but you’ll soon realize the benefits of reading Greek on a daily basis.

  • Invest in a Greek Language Learning App

    One of the best ways to learn a new language on the go is to utilize a language learning app like the one offered by GreekPod101.com. 


Conclusion

Learning Greek is not as hard as you might have thought after all, right?

As long as you find ways to incorporate Greek language learning into your everyday routine, you’ll be able to understand Greek in no time. 


What’s your favorite way to learn a new language? Let us know in the comments below!

Did you know you could begin learning Greek right now in an easy and fun way? Well, now you do! Create your free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com today!

GreekPod101 offers you high-quality, practical materials and lessons covering everything about the Greek language and culture. We aim to provide you with valuable lessons that will keep you interested and engaged from day one. Stay tuned for more articles like this one, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos—all this and more are waiting for you to discover them!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek

A Comprehensive Guide to Greek Business Phrases

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If you’re learning Greek for business purposes or if you’re thinking about relocating to Greece for work, then you’re definitely in the right place! In this article, we’ll outline the most common business phrases in Greek for a variety of situations.

Greece might have undergone a huge financial crisis, but now it’s time to thrive. Many people from all over the world have decided to relocate to Greece in order to enjoy a slower pace of life, along with kind-hearted people, plenty of sunshine, and magnificent islands.

Every language has its own code of ethics when it comes to business. Learning Greek is one thing, but learning all the appropriate ways to interact within a business environment is another. And we’re here to help you master business Greek, in word and action!

In this blog post, you’ll learn all the basics and much more, from nailing your job interview to interacting with your coworkers and handling everyday tasks in your new office.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Business Words and Phrases in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Nailing a Job Interview
  2. Interacting with Coworkers
  3. Sounding Smart in a Meeting
  4. Handling Business Phone Calls & Emails
  5. Going on a Business Trip
  6. Conclusion

1. Nailing a Job Interview

Job Interview

A job interview is always a stressful procedure, especially when it’s conducted in a language other than your mother tongue.

Following is some useful Greek for business interviews. Of course, you can adjust these phrases according to your studies or experience. 

What are you waiting for? Just put a bright smile on and shine!

  • Greek: Γεια σας, ονομάζομαι [Όνομα] [Επίθετο].
  • Romanization: Ya sas, onomázome [Ónoma] [Epítheto].
  • Translation: “Hello, my name is [Name] [Last Name].”
  • Greek: Έχω σπουδάσει Πληροφορική στο Πανεπιστήμιο Μακεδονίας στη Θεσσαλονίκη.
  • Romanization: Ého spudási Pliroforikí sto Panepistímio Makedonías sti Thesaloníki.
  • Translation: “I have studied informatics at the University of Macedonia in Thessaloniki.” 
  • Greek: Έχω προϋπηρεσία σε μια μικρή εταιρεία πληροφορικής.
  • Romanization: Ého proipiresía se mia mikrí etería pliroforikís.
  • Translation: “I have professional experience in a small informatics company.” 
  • Greek: Εκεί εργάστηκα για πέντε χρόνια ως αναλυτής.
  • Romanization: Ekí ergástika ya pénde hrónia os analitís.
  • Translation: “I worked there for five years as an analyst.” 
  • Greek: Είμαι πολύ εργατικός και οργανωτικός.
  • Romanization: Íme polí ergatikós ke organotikós.
  • Translation: “I am very hard-working and organized.” 
  • Greek: Σας ευχαριστώ πολύ για αυτήν την ευκαιρία!
  • Romanization: Sas efharistó poli ya aftín tin efkería!
  • Translation: “Thank you very much for this opportunity!” 
  • Greek: Με συγχωρείτε, μήπως μπορείτε να επαναλάβετε;
  • Romanization: Me sighoríte, mípos boríte na epanalávete?
  • Translation: “Excuse me, could you please repeat?” 

If you feel like expanding your business vocabulary, check out our video Learn Greek Business Language in 15 Minutes below, or study with our article on How to Introduce Yourself in Greek!

2. Interacting with Coworkers

A Woman among Many Colleagues

Interacting with colleagues is an integral part of your professional life. While doing business in Greece, it’s an opportunity to collaborate, get to know new people, and—why not?—make some new friends.

Here’s your cheat sheet for interacting with coworkers:

  • Greek: Γεια σας, είμαι ο/η [Όνομα]. Είμαι ο/η καινούριος/-α σας συνάδελφος. Χαίρω πολύ!
  • Romanization: Ya sas, íme o/i [Ónoma]. Íme o/i kenúrios/-a sas sinádelfos. Héro polí!
  • Translation: “Hello, I am [Name]. I am your new coworker. Nice to meet you!” 
  • Greek: Μήπως μπορείς να με βοηθήσεις, σε παρακαλώ;
  • Romanization: Mípos borís na me voithísis, se parakaló?
  • Translation: “Could you please help me?” 
  • Greek: Συγγνώμη που άργησα.
  • Romanization: Signómi pu áryisa.
  • Translation: “Sorry for being late.” 
  • Greek: Είμαι πολύ αγχωμένος για αυτήν την παρουσίαση.
  • Romanization: Íme polí anhoménos ya aftín tin parusíasi.
  • Translation: “I am very stressed about this presentation.” 
  • Greek: Σήμερα είχα πολλή δουλειά και είμαι κουρασμένος.
  • Romanization: Símera íha polí duliá ke íme kurazménos.
  • Translation: “Today I’ve had a lot of work and I am tired.” 
  • Greek: Θέλεις να πάμε για καφέ μετά τη δουλειά;
  • Romanization: Thélis na páme ya kafé metá ti duliá?
  • Translation: “Would you like to grab a cup of coffee after work?” 

3. Sounding Smart in a Meeting

A Business Meeting from Above

Business meetings are where all the magic happens; they’re a celebration of collaboration and new ideas! We’re sure you want to be an active member of the group, so we’ve compiled a list of phrases that feature Greek business terms you’ll likely hear and use in meetings:

  • Greek: Οι πωλήσεις φαίνεται να αυξήθηκαν κατά το τελευταίο τρίμηνο.
  • Romanization: I polísis fénete na afxíthikan katá to teleftéo trímino.
  • Translation: “Sales seem to have increased during the last trimester.” 
  • Greek: Συμφωνώ απόλυτα με αυτό.
  • Romanization: Simfonó apólita me aftó.
  • Translation: “I totally agree with this.” 
  • Greek: Συγγνώμη, αλλά δεν συμφωνώ με αυτό.
  • Romanization: Signómi, alá den simfonó me aftó.
  • Translation: “Sorry, but I don’t agree with this.” 
  • Greek: Θα μπορούσαμε να το συζητήσουμε αυτό αργότερα;
  • Romanization: Tha borúsame na to sizitísume aftó argótera?
  • Translation: “Could we discuss this later?” 
  • Greek: Σας ευχαριστώ για την προσοχή σας!
  • Romanization: Sas efharisó ya tin prosohí sas!
  • Translation: “Thank you for your attention!” 

Are you wondering how a Greek business meeting might sound? Here is our related Listening Lesson on Preparing for a Business Meeting

Business Phrases

4. Handling Business Phone Calls & Emails

A Man Taking a Business Phone Call and Taking Notes

When making a business call in Greek, it’s very important to address your interlocutor politely. In Greek, it’s common practice to address everyone using the honorific plural (i.e. second person plural, instead of second person singular). 

That being said, here are some of the most popular Greek business phrases when making a phone call:

  • Greek: [Επωνυμία Εταιρείας], λέγετε παρακαλώ. (Answering a work phone)
  • Romanization: [Eponimía Eterías], léyete parakaló.
  • Translation: “This is [Name of the Business].” (lit. “[Name of the Business], please speak.”) 
  • Greek: Καλημέρα σας, ονομάζομαι [Όνομα] [Επίθετο]. (Answering a work phone)
  • Romanization: Kaliméra sas, onomázome [Ónoma] [Epítheto].
  • Translation: “Good morning, my name is [Name] [Last Name].” 
  • Greek: Πώς μπορώ να σας βοηθήσω;
  • Romanization: Pós boró na sas voithíso?
  • Translation: “How may I help you?” 
  • Greek: Σας ευχαριστούμε που καλέσατε!
  • Romanization: Sas efharistúme pu kalésate!
  • Translation: “Thank you for calling!” 
  • Greek: O κ. Παπαδόπουλος απουσιάζει αυτήν την στιγμή.
  • Romanization: O kírios Papadópulos apusiázi aftín tin stigmí.
  • Translation: “Mr. Papadopoulos is not here at the moment.” 
  • Greek: Θα θέλατε να αφήσετε κάποιο μήνυμα;
  • Romanization: Tha thélate na afísete kápio mínima?
  • Translation: “Would you like to leave a message?” 

Sending emails is also a big part of everyday business life. Therefore, we’ve decided to include how you would begin and end a business email:

  • Greek: Αξιότιμε/Αγαπητέ κ. Παπαδόπουλε, ……
  • Romanization: Axiótime/Agapité k. Papadópule, ………..
  • Translation: “Dear Mr. Papadopoulos, ………” 
  • Greek: Αξιότιμη/Αγαπητή κ. Παπαδοπούλου, ……
  • Romanization: Axiótimi/Agapití k. Papadopúlu, ………..
  • Translation: “Dear Mrs. Papadopoulos, ………” 
  • Greek: Με εκτίμηση, ……
  • Romanization: Me ektímisi, ………..
  • Translation: “Sincerely, ………”

Keep in mind that in written Greek, after a greeting line such as the ones above, we use a comma after it and continue with a word in lowercase on the line below.

5. Going on a Business Trip

Two Colleagues being at the Airport during a Business Trip

Last but not least, here are some useful phrases which can be lifesavers during a business trip:

  • Greek: Θα ήθελα ένα κάνω μια κράτηση για ένα δίκλινο δωμάτιο από τις 25 έως τις 27 Απριλίου.
  • Romanization: Tha íthela na káno mia krátisi ya éna díklino domátio apó tis íkosi pénde éos tis íkosi eftá Aprilíu.
  • Translation: “I would like to make a reservation for a double room from the 25th until the 27th of April.” 
  • Greek: Στις 8 Ιουνίου θα λείπω σε επαγγελματικό ταξίδι.
  • Romanization: Stis ohtó Iuníu tha lípo se epangelmatikó taxídi.
  • Translation: “On the 8th of June, I will be on a business trip.” 
  • Greek: Σας ευχαριστώ πολύ για τη φιλοξενία!
  • Romanization: Sas efharistó polí ya ti filoxenía!
  • Translation: “Thank you very much for the hospitality!” 
  • Greek: Θα ήθελα ένα εισιτήριο για την πρώτη πρωινή πτήση της Παρασκευής.
  • Romanization: Tha íthela éna isitírio ya tin próti proiní ptísi tis Paraskevís.
  • Translation: “I would like a ticket for the first morning flight on Friday.” 

For more useful phrases related to travel, check out the following vocabulary lists on GreekPod101.com:

Jobs

6. Conclusion

Learning Greek is often a prerequisite to job hunting in Greece, especially when it comes to professions that require everyday interaction with clients. In addition, remember to always be polite and address others in the honorific plural.

If you’re contemplating finding a job in Greece, check out our guide on How to Find a Job in Greece. There, you’ll find everything you need to know about job hunting in Greece, including where to search for job ads on popular local websites. 

On the other hand, if you feel like digging into business Greek a bit more, here are some relevant lessons on GreekPod101.com: 

In the meantime, is there a Greek business phrase that troubles you? 

Feel free to let us know in the comments!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Business Words and Phrases in Greek

Learn Greek: YouTube Channels to Improve Your Greek Skills

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If you’ve been thinking about ways to improve your Greek, then you’re in the right place! We have the perfect solution for learners who want to supplement their studies with a bit of entertainment: watch Greek YouTube channels! 

YouTube has become an integral part of our lives, mainly for entertainment purposes. However, over the past few years, the video streaming channel has also revolutionized education. Many teachers have decided to offer educational videos on this modern medium, which allows them to combine their teaching process with helpful visuals and explanations. 

Another important advantage of YouTube is its accessibility. People from all over the world can easily access an unprecedented number of videos and literally find anything they need to learn. 

You may be glad to know that GreekPod101 has its own YouTube channel. We offer exclusive educational videos which offer complete and ready-to-use knowledge about the Greek language, from the basics to more specific subjects. 

But while we may have the best Greek learning YouTube channel, we understand that everyone has different tastes. That’s why we’ve included channels in a variety of categories, from comedy to science and plenty of things in-between!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Zouzounia TV
  2. Visit Greece
  3. SKAI.gr
  4. Dionysis Atzarakis
  5. Giorgos Vagiatas
  6. Astronio
  7. Καθημερινή Φυσική
  8. Ευτύχης Μπλέτσας
  9. Learn Greek with GreekPod101.com
  10. Conclusion

1. Zouzounia TV

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Zouzounia TVChildren’s Songs & CartoonsBeginnerΗ Καμήλα

When you think about combining your Greek studies with entertainment, children’s songs and cartoons might not be the first thing to come to mind—but they work wonders for beginners. 

Here are some significant benefits that children’s songs offer: 

  • They use simple Greek vocabulary and sentences
  • They are obviously the best choice for involving your children in your Greek learning process
  • They have catchy melodies, making it easier to remember the lyrics

More specifically, Zouzounia TV is one of the largest YouTube channels in this category.

The word Ζουζούνια (Zuzúnia) literally means “Bugs.” However, it’s a popular Greek word that’s often used to refer to young children in a cute way.

Here’s an example of what a caring Greek mother might say to her young child:

  • Greek: Ζουζούνι μου, θέλεις κι άλλο χυμό;
  • Romanization: Zuzúni mu, thélis ki állo himó?
  • Meaning: “My sweet little bug, do you want some more juice?”

The channel includes Greek songs, often with subtitles. The videos are designed to help children learn proper Greek, but those who are just starting their Greek language learning journey can make good use of it, too! 

2. Visit Greece

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Visit GreeceTravelAbsolute BeginnerUnlock Your Senses in Cyclades

So, you’ve decided to learn Greek…. But there are days when you feel exhausted or procrastination takes over, and you need a little push to stay focused and motivated.

The Visit Greece channel is exactly what you need! This official YouTube channel is run by the Greek Ministry of Tourism and features the most wonderful aspects of Greece. Get lost in a virtual travel experience and learn more about the fascinating Greek culture.

This channel is perfect for absolute beginners, since you can dive into the beauties of Greece and Greek culture with no prior knowledge of the language. 

3. SKAI.gr

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
SKAI.grNews, Shows, Cooking, TravelBeginner – IntermediateΓεύσεις Στη Φύση

SKAI is a major news channel in Greece, offering one of the most popular and diverse Greek news YouTube channels. Here you can enjoy a wide range of genres, ranging from The Skai News coverage of the latest news to popular reality shows. 

If you know the Greek basics, we think you’ll find this channel highly beneficial. 

4. Dionysis Atzarakis

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Dionysis AtzarakisMovies & HumorIntermediate – AdvancedΜια γνώμη για το τέλος του Game of Thrones

What happens when a Greek comedian decides to review movies and series? 

Dionysis Atzarakis has brought to all of us Cinelthete, a Greek show where popular Hollywood movies get roasted. However, he’s not alone in this journey, as he joins forces with his good friend Thomas Zabras, another talented standup comedian. The result is a mix of elegant humor and short impersonation sessions. 

Once again, to get the most enjoyment from this Greek comedy YouTube channel, you should have an intermediate language level or higher. 

5. Giorgos Vagiatas

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Giorgos VagiatasStandup Comedy, TravelIntermediate – AdvancedTop 10 Κατοικιδίων

A group of friends decides to cross Europe in an RV, starting from Serres in Greece and reaching the Gibraltar peninsula, and record their adventures. An innovative idea, which became a beloved series for many Greek fans.

Η εκπομπή με το τροχόσπιτο (RV there yet?), meaning “The show with the motorhome,” will travel you through Europe’s southern shores, featuring many major cities like Florence, Monaco, and Cannes—all the way to Gibraltar. If you love travel and culture, this is the Greek language YouTube channel for you!

However, Giorgos Vagiatas has also released another popular series of videos, featuring Top 10 lists from his unique point of view. 

6. Astronio

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
AstronioPopular Science & AstrophysicsIntermediate – AdvancedΗ Ζωή Στο Ηλιακό Σύστημα

Pavlos Kastanas, a young Greek astrophysicist and science lecturer made a decision: he created Astronio, a YouTube channel focusing on astrophysics. His goal was to explain various science-related phenomena in plain language without skimping on important facts.

On this YouTube channel, you can treat your curiosity with accurate answers to the questions that wander around your head at night:

Astronio, the ultimate Greek YouTube channel for astrophysics-lovers, answers these questions and many more! 

7. Καθημερινή Φυσική

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Καθημερινή ΦυσικήPopular Science & FactsIntermediateΘεωρία Παιγνίων: Το δίλημμα του φυλακισμένου

Channels about popular science are now a trend in Greece, we get it!

So, what’s so special about this one?

Well, Καθημερινή Φυσική (Kathimeriní Fisikí), or “Everyday Science,” uses thoughtful cartoons in order to explain nearly everything that’s happening around us. Plus, the language used is slightly easier compared to that of other YouTube channels with similar themes. 

8. Ευτύχης Μπλέτσας

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Ευτύχης ΜπλέτσαςTravelIntermediateHappy Traveller στην Ικαρία

Over the past four years, Eftihis, along with his wife Helektra and their dog Hercules, travel the world and share with viewers lovely travel tips for experiencing each destination like a local. He also shows appreciation for good food and nature.

Having visited more than fifty countries all over the world, he has grown to be a travel expert, always searching for new experiences.

Join Eftihis in this unique journey and practice your Greek listening skills!

Their show, Happy Traveller, is also broadcasted by one of the major Greek TV channels, SKAI

9. Learn Greek with GreekPod101.com

Channel NameChannel ThemeLevelExample Video
Learn Greek with GreekPod101.comEducation, Language LearningAbsolute Beginner – AdvancedLearn Greek in 30 Minutes: ALL the Basics You Need

Looking for a pure educational approach to the Greek language?

Then you’re already in the right place!

The GreekPod101.com channel on YouTube offers tons of free educational videos to take your Greek to the next level.  

Start learning today:

And many, many more!

Regardless of your level, the GreekPod101 YouTube channel will definitely add to your knowledge! 

10. Conclusion

What’s your favorite Greek YouTube channel? Did you have the chance to take a look at any of the ones above? Let us know in the comments below!

Learning is about so much more than traditional methods. It’s everywhere around us, even on YouTube! Take advantage of this opportunity and get to know Greek culture through the numerous Greek videos available. 

Start learning Greek today in a consistent and organized manner by creating a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com. Tons of free vocabulary lists, YouTube videos, and grammar tips are waiting for you to discover.

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Is Greek Hard to Learn?

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Learning a new language can be intimidating. When it comes to a less-popular language like Greek, spoken by only 13.8 million people worldwide, many potential learners wonder “Is it hard to learn Greek?”

The good news is that Greek is a branch of the Indo-European languages. This means that it shares many common characteristics with Spanish, English, and Italian. 

The bad news is… Wait a minute! Is there really any bad news? 

If you’re reading this article, then you should be fluent in English, regardless of your mother tongue. There it is: you’re already familiar with the philosophy of the most popular Indo-European language. This is a huge asset that will play an important role during your Greek-learning journey. 

With GreekPod101.com, you can start learning Greek in a fast and easy way. From our vast experience with students from all over the world, we’ve gathered in this article the most common difficulties that they face while learning Greek, plus solutions and tips on how to overcome them.

After reading this blog post, you’ll be able to say, out loud and with confidence: “Greek is certainly NOT hard to learn!”

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Learning Greek Table of Contents
  1. You Already Know Some Greek
  2. The Easiest & Hardest Parts of the Greek Language
  3. I Want to Learn Greek. Where Should I Start?
  4. Useful Advice for Novice Greek-Learners
  5. Why is GreekPod101.com Great for Learning Greek?
  6. Conclusion

1. You Already Know Some Greek

Yes, you do!

Did you know that five percent of the words included in a typical English dictionary have Greek origins? 

Take a look at some examples below.

GreekRomanizationEnglish Equivalent
κόσμοςkósmos“cosmos”
ακροβάτηςakrovátis“acrobat”
ιστορίαistoría“history”
ανώνυμοςanónimos“anonymous”
γαλαξίαςgalaxías“galaxy”
βακτήριοvaktírio“bacterium”
ρινόκεροςrinókeros“rhinoceros”
τεχνολογίαtehnoloyía“technology”
σαρκασμόςsarkazmós“sarcasm”
δημοκρατίαdimokratía“democracy”
ΕυρώπηEvrópi“Europe”
μουσικήmusikí“music”
φοβίαfovía“phobia”
πανικόςpanikós“panic”
πλανήτηςplanítis“planet”

And these are only some of them.

Innovation was prominent in ancient Greek culture. Therefore, many discoveries and terms, especially in the fields of mathematics, science, and medicine, originated from Greek.

This magical aspect of the Greek language was once highlighted by Mr. Zolotas, a Greek politician in the 1950s who created a whole speech in English using only Greek words

2. The Easiest & Hardest Parts of the Greek Language

Why is learning Greek so hard for some students? And what things make it pretty easy? We’ll outline both sides of the Greek language in the following sections! 

2.1 Easiest Parts

We could say that there are more easy parts than there are hard parts, for sure. Greek is, overall, not a hard language to learn, remember?

A Smiling Man Leaning Back in His Chair, Relaxed

Here are the easiest aspects of Greek language learning, so you can see for yourself:

  • Alphabet
    Even the word “alphabet” itself stems from the Greek word αλφάβητο (alphávito). The Greek alphabet consists of twenty-four letters, ordered from Α/α (“alpha”) to Ω/ω (“omega”), and it’s pretty similar to the alphabets of other European languages. 

    Tempted to start learning the Greek alphabet today? Watch  our relevant YouTube video to get a glimpse, or begin learning in depth with our Greek Alphabet Made Easy lesson.
  • Word Order
    The basic sentence structure in Greek follows the SVO pattern (Subject-Verb-Object), like the English language. In addition, adjectives are placed before nouns, and adverbs after verbs. 

    Here are some examples of simple Greek sentences:

Greek: Εγώ παίζω κιθάρα.
Romanization: Egó pézo kithára.
Translation: “I play the guitar.”

SubjectVerbObject
Εγώπαίζωκιθάρα

Greek: Ο μαύρος σκύλος κυνηγάει την άσπρη γάτα.
Romanization: O mávros skílos kinigái tin áspri gáta.
Translation: “The black dog chases the white cat.”

SubjectVerbObject
Ο μαύρος σκύλοςκυνηγάειτην άσπρη γάτα.

If you want to learn all the details about Greek word order, read our relevant blog post.

  • Pronunciation
    Phonetically, Greek is very similar to Spanish, Portuguese, and English. There are five basic vowels—i, u, e, o, a—which are typically included in the syllables. There’s also a stress mark, which can be placed only over vowels, indicating an accented syllable.

    Greek also features digraphs (two letters combined, making a distinct sound) and diphthongs (two vowels combined into one syllable), which appear to be tricky for young learners. However, once you learn them and familiarize yourself with the language, these will be a piece of cake.

2.2 Hardest Parts

Well, even the moon has a dark side. Just embrace the challenge!

A Desperate Man Looking at His Laptop in Anger

Here are the main reasons people find the Greek language hard to learn:

  • Spelling
    We’re not going to lie: Greek spelling can push you to your limits. But is this a reason to be disappointed?

    Even native Greek-speakers make spelling mistakes all the time. When you get started with Greek, focus on comprehension and practical examples. Will you make spelling mistakes? Sure. Will you get better and better with practice? Absolutely!

    We strongly recommend reading books, articles, and blog posts in Greek. You can even add Greek subtitles to your favorite movies! By doing so, you’ll familiarize yourself with Greek spelling in no time.
  • Verb conjugation
    Verbs in Greek conjugate according to the subject and the number of subjects in a sentence, the tense, the voice (active and passive voice), and the mood. Therefore, Greek verbs can be found in many forms, which indicate the aforementioned properties. And this can be hard. We know.

    However, once you dig into the grammar rules, you’ll be able to categorize verbs according to their ending, and you’ll quickly become a master of Greek verb conjugation!
  • Noun and adjective declension
    Last, but not least, nouns, pronouns, and adjectives get inflected, too. They showcase different forms according to number, gender, and case. They are also often accompanied by articles, which should agree with the noun.

    This is another aspect that many students find challenging. Nevertheless, this is something that you can overcome easily with proper practice.

3. I Want to Learn Greek. Where Should I Start?

A Sketch of a Head with Post-it Papers

At GreekPod101.com, we’ve mastered self-teaching as a lifelong learning method. Here are our pearls of wisdom for getting started with Greek language learning:

  • Step 1: Start with simple everyday life sentences.
  • Step 2: Try to enhance those sentences with a wider range of vocabulary. Keeping a vocabulary notebook will definitely help.
  • Step 3: Continue with grammar. Focus on the basics of verb, noun, and adjective inflection.
  • Step 4: Enhance your listening skills by watching Greek movies and series.
  • Step 5: Start reading children’s books in Greek. They include very simple sentences and they can really help novice learners.
  • Step 6: Now that you have an understanding of the Greek language, familiarize yourself with syntax and word order. Study different cases, such as subordinate sentences, conditionals, and so on.

4. Useful Advice for Novice Greek-Learners

1. Don’t give up: With consistent studying, you can overcome the difficult parts. 

2. Do practice whenever you are given a chance: Visiting Greece? Or even a Greek restaurant abroad? Don’t be shy! Try ordering and chatting in Greek.

3. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes: It’s a learning experience. Perceive every mistake as an opportunity to learn. 

4. Do try to find Greek communities near you: There’s nothing better than practicing with native speakers. Plus, we bet that you’ll make some new friends!

5. Do plan a trip to Greece: Okay, practicing your Greek might not be your number-one reason to visit Greece, but approach this as a unique opportunity to enjoy crystal-clear beaches, taste delicious food and beverages, and blend in.

5. Why is GreekPod101.com Great for Learning Greek?

GreekPod101 Graphics Demonstrating a Smiling Girl and the Logo

A famous Greek saying goes like this:

Greek: Αν δεν παινέψουμε το σπίτι μας, θα πέσει να μας πλακώσει.
Romanization: An den penépsume to spíti mas, tha pési na mas plakósi.
Translation: “If we don’t praise our home, it will collapse over our heads.”

You saw this coming, didn’t you?

“I bet they’ll promote their website at the end of this article!” you whispered.

However, we assure you: This is not a promotion; it’s encouragement to invest in yourself. 

You can create a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com and enjoy tons of free video, audio, and PDF lessons, as well as many other benefits.

So, why is GreekPod101.com great for learning Greek?

  • It gets you to speak Greek from day one.
  • It focuses on practical examples, rather than strict grammar rules. 
  • It includes an assessment test to assign you to the most appropriate level and learning path.
  • It allows you to create your own vocabulary lists. 
  • It lets you refresh your knowledge easily and quickly through flashcards.
  • It offers you a wide range of totally free lessons focused on grammar, vocabulary, and listening, categorized by knowledge level.
  • MyTeacher Service: You can create a premium account in order to get access to a personal teacher. This is a unique opportunity to get in touch with an experienced native speaker, who will help you through your learning process.

6. Conclusion

We’d love to hear from you! 

Feel free to share your experience with the Greek language so far in the comments below.

  • Which aspects do you find intriguing?
  • Which was the easiest part of learning Greek?
  • What aspect troubles you the most?

Let us know in the comments!

Start learning Greek today in a consistent and organized manner by creating a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com. Tons of free vocabulary lists, YouTube videos, and grammar tips are waiting for you.

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The Most Common Mistakes in Learning Greek

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We all make mistakes. That’s a fact. 

When it comes to learning a new language, it’s almost certain that you’ll make numerous mistakes. And mistakes on top of those mistakes. And a few more.

But you’ll learn. It’s all part of the learning process, right?

In this article, we’ll go over the most common mistakes Greek language-learners make. Learn everything you need to know early on, so that you can avoid these mistakes in Greek and sound more like a native speaker.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. Greek Pronunciation Mistakes
  2. Greek Vocabulary Mistakes
  3. Greek Grammar Mistakes
  4. Other Greek Mistakes
  5. The Biggest Mistake
  6. Conclusion

1. Greek Pronunciation Mistakes

A Woman Shutting Her Mouth with Both Hands

The most common mistake in Greek pronunciation is stressing words incorrectly. As a student, you should pay attention to the accent marks, because they’ll help you pronounce Greek words correctly.

At GreekPod101.com, we pay close attention to pronunciation. It’s the key to speaking and sounding like a Greek, after all. Therefore, alongside each and every Greek word in our learning material, we also offer its romanization, along with accent marks.

Another common pronunciation mistake Greek-learners make involves certain consonants. 

For example, English-speaking learners tend to pronounce the consonants τ and π strangely, whereas French-speaking learners struggle to pronounce the consonant ρ. Since our mother tongue determines our pronunciation capabilities, it makes sense that some difficulties may arise. There’s nothing you can’t overcome with practice, though!

Here’s another typical pronunciation mistake: The problem of digraphs. 

Sounds pretty serious, right? Well, it isn’t, as long as you pay attention to the following guidelines.

First and foremost, you’re most likely wondering: “What are digraphs?”

They’re a pair of vowels that are pronounced as one distinct sound. Here, we’ve gathered some of the most common Greek digraphs for you, including examples:

1.1 “Οι” / “οι”

Sounds like: “i” as in the word “info”
Often mistaken as: “o-i”

Example

Greek: Η οικονομία της Ελλάδας πέρασε κρίση.
Romanization: I ikonomía tis Eládas pérase krísi.
Translation: “The economy of Greece has gone through a crisis.”

1.2 “Ει” / “ει”

Sounds like: “i” as in the word “info”
Often mistaken as: “e-i”

Example

Greek: Η παγκόσμια ειρήνη είναι πολύ σημαντική.
Romanization: I pangózmia iríni íne polí simandikí.
Translation: “Worldwide peace is very important.”

1.3 “Αι” / “αι”

Sounds like: “e” as in the word “error”
Often mistaken as: “a-i”

Example

Greek: Οι άνθρωποι έχουν πέντε αισθήσεις.
Romanization:I ánthropi éhun pénde esthísis.
Translation: “Humans have five senses.”

A Woman Holding Her Head with Her Hand in Despair

1.4 “Ευ” / “ευ”

Sounds like: “ev” as in the word “everything” OR “ef” as in the word “effect”
Often mistaken as: “e-i”

Examples

Greek: Σε ευχαριστώ πολύ!
Romanization: Se efharistó polí.
Translation: “Thank you very much.”

Greek: Ο υπάλληλος ήταν πολύ ευγενικός.
Romanization: O ipálilos ítan polí evyenikós.
Translation: “The (male) employee was very polite.”

So, right now, you must be wondering: “How can I tell when this digraph should sound like ‘ev’ or ‘ef’?”

Luckily, there’s a certain rule: 

  • It’s pronounced as “ev” when the next syllable begins with a vowel sound or a voiced consonant sound: β, γ, δ, ζ, λ, μ, ν, ρ, τζ, μπ, ντ, γγ, and γκ.
  • It’s pronounced as “ef” when the next syllable begins with the consonants ξ (x) and ψ (ps), an unvoiced consonant sound (κ, π, τ, χ, φ, θ, σ, and τσ) or when the combination is at the end of a word or by itself (ex. ευ αγωνίζεσθαι (ef agonízesthai), meaning “fair play”).

At first, you should think about this rule every time you encounter this digraph. However, with practice, you’ll be able to recognize how it should sound in each word.

1.5 “Αυ” / “αυ”

Sounds like: “av” as in the word “average” OR “af” as in the word “after”
Often mistaken as “a-i”

Examples

Greek: Αυτός είναι ο δάσκαλός μου.
Romanization: Aftós íne o dáskalós mu.
Translation: “This is my (male) teacher.”

Greek: Θέλεις να πάμε για καφέ αύριο;
Romanization: Thélis na páme ya kafé ávrio?
Translation: “Do you want to go for a coffee tomorrow?”

Similarly to the last digraph, there’s a rule for deciding whether it should sound like “af” or “av.”

  • It’s pronounced as “av” when the next syllable begins with a vowel sound or a voiced consonant sound: β, γ, δ, ζ, λ, μ, ν, ρ, τζ, μπ, ντ, γγ, and γκ.
  • It’s pronounced as “af” when the next syllable begins with the consonants ξ (x) and ψ (ps), an unvoiced consonant sound (κ, π, τ, χ, φ, θ, σ, and τσ), or when the combination is at the end of a word (ex. ταυ, which is the letter “t” in Greek).

2. Greek Vocabulary Mistakes

We could say that the most common vocabulary mistake in Greek is the one demonstrated below.

Greek: Αυτός είναι Έλληνας.

Romanization: Aftós íne Élinas.

Translation: “He is Greek.”
Greek: Αυτή είναι Ελληνίδα.

Romanization: Aftí íne Elinída.

Translation: “She is Greek.”
Greek: Μου αρέσει το ελληνικό φαγητό.

Romanization: Mu arési to elinikó fayitó.

Translation: “I like Greek food.”
Greek: Εγώ μαθαίνω ελληνικά.

Romanization: Egó mathéno eliniká.

Translation: “I learn Greek (language).”

In English, there’s one word that describes the Greek nationality, language, and anything related to Greece. But in Greek, there are different words that need to be used depending on what exactly you’re talking about.

3. Greek Grammar Mistakes

Correcting a Text with a Red Pen

3.1 The Most Common Mistakes Concerning Nouns & Adjectives

Mixing up genders

In Greek, each noun has its own gender (male-female-neuter). This affects not only nouns, but also the accompanying articles and adjectives. 

Male NounFemale NounNeutral Noun
Greek: Ο πράσινος κήπος.
Romanization: O prásinos kípos.
Translation: “The green garden.”
Greek: Η πράσινη τσάντα.
Romanization: I prásini tsánda.
Translation: “The green bag.”
Greek: Το πράσινο χορτάρι.
Romanization: To prásino hortári.
Translation: “The green grass.”

Mixing up singular & plural

In Greek, each noun is either in the singular form or in the plural. This also affects the accompanying articles and adjectives. 

SingularPlural
Greek: Το ωραίο νησί.
Romanization: To oréo nisí.
Translation: “The beautiful island.”
Greek: Τα ωραία νησιά.
Romanization: Ta oréa nisiá.
Translation: “The beautiful islands.”

Mixing up cases

Nouns in Greek get declined, so they might appear slightly different in each case. The most common source of confusion is between the nominative and accusative cases. A rule of thumb is that when the noun is the subject of the sentence, it should be in the nominative case; when it’s the object of the sentence, it should usually be in the accusative case.

NominativeAccusative
Greek: Ο τοίχος είναι άσπρος.
Romanization: O tíhos íne áspros.
Translation: “The wall is white.”
Greek: Εγώ έβαψα τον τοίχο.
Romanization: Egó évapsa ton tího.
Translation: “I painted the wall.”

3.2 The Most Common Mistakes Concerning Verbs

A Woman Wondering in Front of a Laptop

Mixing up the tenses

Verbs conjugate according to the tense. There are also some irregular verbs, which you should learn by heart.

Here are some examples of the most common irregular Greek verbs in the present and past tenses.

Simple PresentSimple Past
βλέπω (vlépo) – “I see”είδα (ída) – “I saw” 
πηγαίνω (piyéno) – “I go”πήγα (píga) – “I went”
βρίσκω (vrísko) – “I find”βρήκα (vríka) – “I found”
λέω (léo) – “I tell”είπα (ípa) – “I told”
τρώω (tróo) – “I eat”έφαγα (éfaga) – “I ate”
πίνω (píno) – “I drink”ήπια (ípia) – “I drank”

Luckily, the Greek tenses are quite similar to the English ones. Therefore, English-speakers won’t find it difficult to decide which tense to use in each situation.

Mixing up the grammatical mood

Greek verbs also conjugate according to the grammatical mood. Here’s a useful guide on how to select the proper mood for each verb:

Indicative mood: This mood indicates that the action or event is true or really happened (i.e. an objective fact).

Greek: Ο μαθητής πηγαίνει στο σχολείο.
Romanization: O mathitís piyéni sto sholío.
Translation: “The student goes to school.”

Subjunctive mood: This mood presents the action or event as something wanted or expected (but isn’t actually happening / didn’t happen). 

Greek: Ο μαθητής πρέπει να πηγαίνει στο σχολείο.
Romanization: O mathitís prépi na piyéni sto sholío.
Translation: “The student should go to school.”

Imperative mood: This mood may express a command (order), request, or desire.

Greek: Πήγαινε στο σχολείο!
Romanization: Píyene sto sholío!
Translation: “Go to school!”

The participle: This is the uninflected form that has an adverbial function, and it may indicate time, manner, cause, condition, etc.

Greek: Πηγαίνοντας στο σχολείο βρήκα ένα στιλό στον δρόμο.
Romanization: Piyénondas sto sholío vríka éna stiló ston drómo.
Translation: “While going to school, I found a pen on the street.”

The infinitive: This is an uninflected form. It’s used for the formation of the perfective tenses: present perfect, past perfect, and future perfect.

Greek: Αύριο ο μαθητής θα πάει στο σχολείο.
Romanization: Ávrio o mathitís tha pái sto scholío.
Translation: “Tomorrow, the student will go to school.”

Mixing up the voice

In Greek, there are two major voices: the active voice and the passive voice. A rule of thumb for determining whether a verb is in the active or passive voice is demonstrated below.

Verbs in the active voice typically end in . Verbs in the passive voice most commonly end in -μαι in the first person. 

Active VoicePassive Voice
Greek: Ο φούρνος ψήνει το παστίτσιο.
Romanization: O fúrnos psíni to pastítsio.
Translation: “The oven bakes the pastitsio.”
Greek: To παστίτσιο ψήνεται από τον φούρνο.
Romanization: Τo pastítsio psínete apó ton fúrno.
Translation: “The pastitsio is baked by the oven.”

Mixing up the persons

Verbs in Greek also conjugate according to the person they refer to, that is, the person(s) who performs the action. 

4. Other Greek Mistakes

In Greek, you use the second person plural—εσείς (esís), meaning “you”—to speak politely and formally with someone. This is usually a person who is superior to you or who you don’t know well. All components of the sentence should agree with the pronoun you use.

A Man Greeting a Woman in a Business Environment
Informal QuestionFormal Question
Greek: Τι κάνεις; Είσαι καλά;
Romanization: Ti kánis? Íse kalá?
Translation: “How are you? Are you well?”
Greek: Τι κάνετε; Είστε καλά;
Romanization: Ti kánete? Íste kalá?
Translation: “How are you? Are you well?”

5. The Biggest Mistake

Sit back and prepare yourself, because we’re about to reveal the biggest mistake a Greek-learner can make: 

Giving Up

Yes, there it is. 

The biggest mistake is simply giving up. 

Greek, especially its grammar, might seem pretty complicated through the eyes of a novice learner. Take a deep breath and just keep practicing!

Here are some tips to help you study Greek in a fun way:


6. Conclusion

Now that you’ve browsed through the most common Greek language mistakes, what mistakes do you usually make when studying Greek?

Let us know in the comments!

Start learning Greek today in a consistent and organized manner by creating a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com. Tons of free vocabulary lists, YouTube videos, and grammar tips await you.

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The Top 10 Popular Greek Questions and Answers

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“Oh, how can I say this in Greek?”

You’ve been there. We know.

That’s why we’ve created this blog post, featuring the top ten most popular questions and their answers in Greek. 

Whether you’ve just started learning Greek or you’re thinking about it, after reading this guide, you’ll be able to construct simple Greek questions and answers with accuracy. 

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Greek Table of Contents
  1. What’s your name?
  2. Where are you from?
  3. Do you speak Greek?
  4. How long have you been studying Greek?
  5. Have you been to Greece?
  6. What’s the weather like today?
  7. Do you like Greek food?
  8. What are you doing?
  9. What’s wrong?
  10. How much is it?
  11. Conclusion

1. What’s your name?

First Encounter

So, what’s the first thing you want to ask when meeting someone new? Their name, of course. Here’s how to ask someone “What’s your name?” in Greek.

The Question

  • Greek: Πώς σε λένε;
  • Romanization: Pós se léne?
  • Literal Translation: “How are you named?” / “How are you called?”
  • Translation: “What’s your name?”

Unlike in English, which asks “What’s your name?” in Greek, we use the phrase Πώς σε λένε;, which better corresponds to “How are you named?” or “How are you called?” As far as Greek language questions go, this is the simplest and definitely the most popular. It can be useful when getting to know people in an informal setting. 

The Answer

  • Greek: Ναταλία, κι εσένα;
  • Romanization: Natalía, ki eséna?
  • Translation: “Natalia, and you?”

This is the simplest answer you can give. Just state your name, followed by …κι εσένα;, which reverses the question to the individual who asked you. This is considered a decent and polite way to respond, since it shows that you’re interested in getting to know the other person. 

At this point, we should note that the word “and” is translated in Greek as και. However, when the next word begins with a vowel, when speaking, it usually becomes κι. This is very common in Greek, but even if you say και εσένα, nobody will notice.

Here are some other variations that answer the same question:

  • Greek: Με λένε Μαρία. Εσένα;
  • Romanization: Me léne María. Eséna?
  • Literal Translation: “I am named Maria. You?”
  • Translation: “My name is Maria. Yours?”
  • Greek: Είμαι ο Γιώργος. Εσένα πώς σε λένε;
  • Romanization: Íme o Yórgos. Eséna pós se léne?
  • Translation: “I am George. What’s your name?”

To learn more about how to give a full self-introduction, check out our relevant blog post

2. Where are you from?

Two Children Playing with an Educational Globe.

Here’s another popular question, which is a perfect conversation starter.

The Question

  • Greek: Από πού είσαι;
  • Romanization: Apó pu íse?
  • Translation: “Where are you from?”

Generally, you can answer by saying:

 Είμαι από…. + definite article in the accusative case + place.

Here are some examples:

The Answer

  • Greek: Είμαι από την Ελλάδα.
  • Romanization: Íme apó tin Εláda.
  • Translation: “I am from Greece.”
  • Greek: Είμαι από την Αμερική.
  • Romanization: Íme apó tin Amerikí.
  • Translation: “I am from America.”
  • Greek: Είμαι από τον Καναδά.
  • Romanization: Íme apó ton Kanadá.
  • Translation: “I am from Canada.”

As you might have noticed, we say Είμαι από την Αμερική and Είμαι από τον Καναδά. They’re both definite articles, but why are they different?

In Greek, nouns fall into three categories, according to their gender: feminine, masculine, and neutral. So, Αμερική is feminine and Καναδάς is masculine. Therefore, they’re accompanied by the appropriate definite article. 

If you want to learn more about definite articles and their use in Greek, we’ve got you covered. Watch our relevant video

3. Do you speak Greek?

Before starting a conversation with someone, it’s probably a good idea to ask them whether they speak Greek. Here are the Greek questions and answers you can use and expect. 

The Question

  • Greek: Μιλάς ελληνικά;
  • Romanization: Milás eliniká?
  • Translation: “Do you speak Greek?”

The Answer

  • Greek: Ναι, μιλάω λίγο ελληνικά.
  • Romanization: Ne, miláo lígo eliniká.
  • Translation: “Yes, I speak a little Greek.”
  • Greek: Ναι, μιλάω πολύ καλά ελληνικά.
  • Romanization: Ne, miláo polí kalá eliniká.
  • Translation: “Yes, I speak Greek very well.”
  • Greek: Όχι, δεν μιλάω ελληνικά.
  • Romanization: Óhi, den miláo eliniká.
  • Translation: “No, I don’t speak Greek.”

Of course, you can use the same phrase (Μιλάς + language;) to ask someone if they speak any other language.

Introducing Yourself

4. How long have you been studying Greek?

This is one of the easy Greek questions that a foreigner may be asked during a conversation. Here’s how to ask and answer! 

The Question

  • Greek: Πόσο καιρό μαθαίνεις ελληνικά;
  • Romanization: Póso keró mathénis eliniká?
  • Translation: “How long have you been learning Greek?”

The Answer

  • Greek: Mαθαίνω ελληνικά εδώ και 1 χρόνο.
  • Romanization: Mathéno eliniká edó ke énan hróno.
  • Translation: “I have been learning Greek for a year now.”

5. Have you been to Greece?

The Ancient Ruins of Olympia in Greece

Do you want to exchange some travel experience about Greece?

Then simply ask this question. 

The Question

  • Greek: Έχεις επισκεφτεί την Ελλάδα;
  • Romanization: Éhis episkeftí tin Elláda?
  • Translation: “Have you visited Greece?”

The Answer

  • Greek: Ναι, έχω πάει στην Ελλάδα δύο φορές.
  • Romanization: Ne, ého pái stin Eláda dío forés.
  • Translation: “Yes, I have been to Greece twice.”
  • Greek: Δυστυχώς όχι, αλλά θα ήθελα.
  • Romanization: Distihós óhi, alá tha íthela.
  • Translation: “Unfortunately no, but I want to.”

If you’re planning to visit Greece soon, check out our Survival Greek Phrases Series.

6. What’s the weather like today?

Ocean

Greece is blessed with mild weather and a Mediterranean climate. Summer is hot and sunny, whereas winter is not extremely cold. It’s a fact that many locals go swimming at the beach during the winter, as well. 

Here’s how you can ask for info about the weather in Greek. 

The Question

  • Greek: Πώς είναι ο καιρός σήμερα;
  • Romanization: Pós íne o kerós símera?
  • Translation: “How is the weather today?”
  • Greek: Τι καιρό κάνει σήμερα;
  • Romanization: Ti keró káni símera?
  • Translation: “What is the weather like today?”

The Answer

  • Greek: Σήμερα έχει λιακάδα.
  • Romanization: Símera éhi liakáda.
  • Translation: “Today is sunny.”
  • Greek: Σήμερα έχει συννεφιά.
  • Romanization: Símera éhi sinefiá.
  • Translation: “Today is cloudy.”
  • Greek: Σήμερα βρέχει.
  • Romanization: Símera vréhi.
  • Translation: “Today it’s raining.”

Of course, these are just the most basic answers. Learn more about The Weather in Greece or enhance your vocabulary with the Top 15 Weather Conditions

7. Do you like Greek food?

Who doesn’t like Greek cuisine? If you haven’t tried it, it’s a must! 

Just visit a Greek restaurant, or ταβέρνα (tavérna), and try one of the following: pastitsio, mousakas, kleftiko, gemista, gyros, souvlaki, tzatziki, or an authentic Greek salad!

The Question

  • Greek: Σου αρέσει το ελληνικό φαγητό;
  • Romanization: Su arési to ellinikó fayitó?
  • Translation: “Do you like Greek food?”

The Answer

  • Greek: Ναι, μου αρέσει πάρα πολύ!
  • Romanization: Ne, mu arési pára polí!
  • Translation: “Yes, I like it very much!”
  • Greek: Όχι, δεν μου αρέσει.
  • Romanization: Óhi, den mu arési.
  • Translation: “Νο, I don’t like it.”

If you need more information, you can Learn How to Order at a Greek Restaurant.

8. What are you doing?

In Greek culture, questions like this are a typical, informal way to check on someone. This question also corresponds to “How are you?”

The Question

  • Greek: Τι κάνεις;
  • Romanization: Ti kánis?
  • Translation: “What are you doing?” / “How are you?”

The Answer

  • Greek: Είμαι καλά, ευχαριστώ. Εσύ;
  • Romanization: Íme kalá, efharistó. Esí?
  • Translation: “I am fine, thank you. You?”

9. What’s wrong?

In Greece, it’s considered polite to ask someone if they’re okay. However, if you’re not close friends, the most likely answer would be “Everything is fine.”

The Question

  • Greek: Τι έχεις;
  • Romanization: Ti éhis?
  • Translation: “What do you have?” / “What’s wrong?”

The Answer

  • Greek: Τίποτα, είμαι μια χαρά.
  • Romanization: Típota, íme mia hará.
  • Translation: “Nothing, I am fine.”
  • Greek: Δεν είμαι και πολύ καλά.
  • Romanization: Den íme ke polí kalá.
  • Translation: “I’m not doing very well.”

You can learn more about positive and negative emotions in our vocabulary lists. 

10. How much is it?

A Woman Asking for a Price on a Blouse

Last, but not least, you should know how to ask for an item’s price. Below, you can find how to do so in Greek. 

The Question

  • Greek: Πόσο κοστίζει/κάνει αυτό;
  • Romanization: Póso kostízi/káni aftó?
  • Translation: “How much does this cost?”

The Answer

  • Greek: Kοστίζει/Κάνει 10 ευρώ.
  • Romanization: Κostízi/Káni déka evró.
  • Translation: “It costs 10 euros.”

11. Conclusion

These were the most popular questions and their answers in Greek! We hope you’re now more confident about asking questions to your Greek friends or family.

GreekPod101.com offers you high-quality, practical lessons about the Greek language.  

At GreekPod101.com, we aim to provide you with everything you need to know about the Greek language in a fun and interesting way. Stay tuned for more articles like this one, word lists, grammar tips, and even YouTube videos, which are waiting for you to discover!

In the meantime, can you think of any more Greek questions and answers not included in this list? Let us know in the comments, and we’ll surely inform you about their Greek equivalents!

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Your Guide to the Greek Language Certification Examination

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So, you’ve been learning Greek for a while, and have reached a certain level of fluency. 

Now what?

Learning a new language is mainly a personal journey, but there are certain situations where having a certification could be useful. Through an official Greek test or exam, you can test your knowledge and add a new language to your CV. 

Here’s everything you need to know about getting your Greek language knowledge certified.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Study Strategies in Greek Table of Contents
  1. General Information About the Exam
  2. Examination Sections
  3. A1 Level – Beginner
  4. A2 Level – Elementary
  5. B1 Level – Intermediate
  6. B2 Level – Upper-Intermediate
  7. C1 Level – Advanced
  8. C2 Level – Proficiency
  9. Tips on How to Prepare for the Exam
  10. Conclusion

1. General Information About the Exam

The organization responsible for the Official Greek Assessment Test for Foreigners is The Center of Greek Language (Κέντρο Ελληνικής Γλώσσας).

Students Writing an Exam

The available levels, listed below, correspond to the European Standards:

  • A1: Beginner
  • A2: Elementary
  • B1: Intermediate
  • B2: Upper-Intermediate
  • C1: Advanced
  • C2: Mastery or Proficiency

This Greek examination is offered for the following purposes:

  • Business Purposes. For some jobs, it’s a prerequisite to be certified in the Greek language. The required extent of this knowledge is determined by each job position.
  • Studying Purposes. In order to study in a Greek university, the prerequisite is to hold a B2 certificate or higher.
  • Working for the Public Sector. To apply for a job in the Greek public sector, one must have the C1 certificate or higher.
  • Residence Permit (Long-Lasting). In order to acquire a long-lasting residence permit, one of the prerequisites is to hold at least an A2 Greek knowledge certificate.
  • Specified Business Purposes. Some fields of work, such as taxi-driving and nursing, require at least the A2 Greek knowledge certificate. 

However, you can choose to get your knowledge certified for other reasons.

A Woman Preparing for the Greek Exams

There’s a wide variety of topics referenced in the Greek language proficiency exams, which cover many aspects of everyday life, including:

  • Personal life inside and outside the house
    • Recognition of one’s identity
    • Residence
    • Location, Environment, Flora & Fauna, Weather Conditions
    • Free Time & Entertainment
    • Social Relations
    • Health & Body Condition
  • Everyday life
    • Activities inside the house
    • Activities outside the house (Purchasing Products & Services, Nutrition, Education, Worklife, Public Services, Transportation & Traveling)

The exams take place once a year (most commonly in mid-May). There are many examination centers in Europe, the USA, Canada, South America, North and South Africa, Asia, and Australia.

2. Examination Sections

The Greek language exams can be taken at six possible levels, which we outlined earlier. The number of sections a test has depends on what level it is:

  • Levels A1, A2, B1
    • Four sections (Reading, Listening, Writing, Speaking)
  • Levels B2, C1, C2
    • Five sections (Listening, Reading, Use of Greek, Writing, Speaking)
A Woman Studying Greek
  • Reading 

This part of the Greek proficiency exam aims to check how well a student understands written Greek. Normally, a short passage is given, followed by questions. For the lower levels, these questions may include multiple choices and matching choices, whereas higher levels will have more complicated questions.

  • Listening 

This part of the examination usually includes short dialogues by native speakers. The types and lengths of the dialogues can vary depending on the level of the examination. Normally, there are multiple-choice answers for each question. 

  • Writing 

For beginner levels, students are normally asked to write a letter to a friend or a family member, presenting their opinion about or experience with a specific matter. For more intermediate levels, the writing section might include an essay or a more formal letter. 

  • Speaking 

For the Greek speaking exam, students are assessed in groups of two. Normally, a central question is given, which sets the tone of the discussion. In this section, the students are asked to express their opinion on a variety of everyday matters. 

  • Use of Greek

This is probably the least familiar section to students. It normally includes a two- or three-paragraphs-long passage, where there are gaps. For each gap, the student should choose the most appropriate word from multiple choices. This part is only included in upper-level examinations, mainly because it aims to test a student’s knowledge of special expressions and colloquialisms.

3. A1 Level – Beginner

This is the first examination level, and it includes four sections: Reading, Listening, Writing, and Speaking. 

Here’s an overview of the exam:

ReadingListeningWritingSpeaking
Parts442N/A
Duration30 minutes25 minutes40 minutes10-12 minutes
MeansN/ACDN/A2 Examiners & 2 Candidates
% Marking (Points)25252525

The main goal of this examination is to test the basic skills in understanding and producing written and oral Greek.

Language Skills

4. A2 Level – Elementary

The next level includes the same sections: Reading, Listening, Writing, and Speaking.

You can find an overview of the exam below:

ReadingListeningWritingSpeaking
Parts442N/A
Duration30 minutes25 minutes45 minutes12 minutes
MeansN/ACDN/A2 Examiners & 2 Candidates
% Marking (Points)25252525

5. B1 Level – Intermediate

The intermediate level follows the same layout, with the same sections: Reading, Listening, Writing, and Speaking.

Here’s an overview of the B1 Level examination: 

ReadingListeningWritingSpeaking
Parts422N/A
Duration40 minutes25 minutes55 minutes12 minutes
MeansN/ACDN/A2 Examiners & 2 Candidates
% Marking (Points)25252525

6. B2 Level – Upper-Intermediate

As we’ve already mentioned, a new section is included in this level: Use of Greek, along with Reading, Listening, Writing, and Speaking.

An overview of the examination is demonstrated below:

ReadingListeningWritingSpeakingUse of Greek
Parts322N/AN/A
Duration45 minutes30 minutes85 minutes15 minutes30 minutes
MeansN/ACDN/A2 Examiners & 2 Candidates3 Examiners
% Marking (Points)2020202020

7. C1 Level – Advanced

This examination is definitely for advanced learners. Although it includes the same sections as the previous level, the students should be comfortable with some native Greek expressions and colloquialisms.

Here’s an overview of the examination:

ReadingListeningWritingSpeakingUse of Greek
Parts422N/AN/A
Duration55 minutes40 minutes100 minutes20 minutes30 minutes
MeansN/ACDN/A2 Examiners & 2 Candidates4 Examiners
% Marking (Points)2020202020

8. C2 Level – Proficiency

This is your chance to shine! 

When you achieve fluency, this is definitely the ultimate examination—and the most difficult. It includes many native expressions and it requires deep knowledge of Greek grammar and its exceptions, as well as fluency in oral speech. 

Find a summary of the complete examination below:

ReadingListeningWritingSpeakingUse of Greek
Parts422N/AN/A
Duration55 minutes40 minutes100 minutes20 minutes30 minutes
MeansN/ACDN/A2 Examiners & 2 Candidates4 Examiners
% Marking (Points)2020202020

9. Tips on How to Prepare for the Exam

A Happy Man Who Got a Good Grade

Preparing for any exam requires much effort and discipline. Here are some useful tips you can use to make this process as easy as possible.

  • Start with the Grammar

Create a notebook with grammar tips and revise your notes regularly. Greek grammar is not very easy, and it includes many exceptions to the various rules, so you should be prepared to study a lot of grammar whilst preparing for the exam.

  • Continue with Vocabulary

Another notebook you should create is a vocabulary notebook. Simply write down all of the unknown words you encounter while studying. For adjectives, it’s good to write down their variations in different genders (male, female, neutral), as well.

  • Read Greek Articles Online

Did you know you can have endless reading practice online? You can find a wide variety of articles on various subjects from Greek websites. Select a theme you like and begin reading articles in Greek! Write down any unknown words and enhance your vocabulary notebook.

  • Read Greek Books

Another great way to improve your reading and comprehension skills is reading Greek books. If you’re a novice Greek learner, start with children’s books, which use much simpler language and vocabulary. 

  • Watch Greek TV Shows

Watching Greek movies and TV shows will improve your listening skills for sure! Actually, we’ve prepared a relevant list for you with the most wonderful Greek movies. Check it out! 

  • MyTeacher – Your Teacher

Did you know that you can have a personal tutor to answer all your questions, without ever leaving your home? With our premium MyTeacher feature, you’ll be assigned a personal teacher who will share with you all the important tips, grammar rules, and native expressions you need to reach fluency. 

  • Do as Many Mock Tests as You Can

Okay, this is obvious. You have to get used to the layout of the examination you’re going to take. So, you should spend some time practicing by doing as many mock tests as you can.

10. Conclusion

Taking a Greek language exam can be useful whether you aim to work in Greece or you just want to certify your knowledge. 

If you need more info about the official Greek examinations, you can always visit the Official Website of Greek Learning; you can also find some sample tests there. However, the website is in Greek, so you should have some basic knowledge to ensure a smooth browsing experience.

Start learning Greek today in a consistent and organized manner by creating a free lifetime account on GreekPod101.com. Tons of free vocabulary lists, YouTube videos, and grammar tips are waiting for you to discover. 

How do you feel about taking a Greek exam now? If you have any questions, let us know in the comments and we’d be happy to help!

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Greek Keyboard: How to Install and Type in Greek

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You asked, so we provided—easy-to-follow instructions on how to set up your electronic devices to write in Greek! We’ll also give you a few excellent tips on how to use this keyboard, as well as some online and app alternatives if you prefer not to set up a Greek keyboard.

Log in to Download Your Free Greek Alphabet Worksheet Table of Contents
  1. Why it’s Important to Learn to Type in Greek
  2. Setting up Your Computer and Mobile Devices for Greek
  3. How to Activate an Onscreen Keyboard on Your Computer
  4. How to Change the Language Settings to Greek on Your Computer
  5. Activating the Greek Keyboard on Your Mobile Phone and Tablet
  6. Greek Keyboard Typing Tips
  7. How to Practice Typing Greek

1. Why it’s Important to Learn to Type in Greek

A keyboard

Learning a new language is made so much easier when you’re able to read and write/type it. This way, you will:

  • Get the most out of any dictionary and Greek language apps on your devices
  • Expand your ability to find Greek websites and use the various search engines
  • Be able to communicate much better online with your Greek teachers and friends, and look super cool in the process! 

2. Setting up Your Computer and Mobile Devices for Greek

A phone charging on a dock

It takes only a few steps to set up any of your devices to read and type in Greek. It’s super-easy on your mobile phone and tablet, and a simple process on your computer.

On your computer, you’ll first activate the onscreen keyboard to work with. You’ll only be using your mouse or touchpad/pointer for this keyboard. Then, you’ll need to change the language setting to Greek, so all text will appear in Greek. You could also opt to use online keyboards instead. Read on for the links!

On your mobile devices, it’s even easier—you only have to change the keyboard. We also provide a few alternatives in the form of online keyboards and downloadable apps.

3. How to Activate an Onscreen Keyboard on Your Computer

1- Mac

1. Go to System Preferences > Keyboard.

2. Check the option “Show Keyboard & Character Viewers in Menu Bar.”

3. You’ll see a new icon on the right side of the main bar; click on it and select “Show Keyboard Viewer.”

A screenshot of the keyboard viewer screen

2- Windows

1. Go to Start > Settings > Easy Access > Keyboard.

2. Turn on the option for “Onscreen Keyboard.”

3- Add-ons of Extensions for Browsers

Instead of an online keyboard, you could also choose to download a Google extension to your browser for a language input tool. The Google Input Tools extension allows users to use input tools in Chrome web pages, for example.

4. How to Change the Language Settings to Greek on Your Computer

Man looking at his computer

Now that you’re all set to work with an onscreen keyboard on your computer, it’s time to download the Greek language pack for your operating system of choice:

  • Windows 8 (and higher)
  • Windows 7
  • Mac (OS X and higher)

1- Windows 8 (and higher)

  1. Go to “Settings” > “Change PC Settings” > “Time & Language” > “Region & Language.”
  2. Click on “Add a Language” and select “Greek.” This will add it to your list of languages. It will appear as Ελληνικά with the note “language pack available.”
  3. Click on “Ελληνικά” > “Options” > “Download.” It will take a few minutes to download and install the language pack.
  4. As a keyboard layout, you’ll only need the one marked as “Greek – Ελληνικά.” You can ignore other keyboard layouts.

2- Windows 7

1. Go to Start > Control Panel > Clock, Language, and Region.

2. On the “Region and Language” option, click on “Change Keyboards or Other Input Methods.”

3. On the “Keyboards and Languages” tab, click on “Change Keyboards” > “Add” > “Greek.”

4. Expand the option of “Greek” and then expand the option “Keyboard.” Select the keyboard layout marked as “Greek.” You can ignore other keyboard layouts. Click “OK” and then “Apply.”

3- Mac (OS X and higher)

If you can’t see the language listed, please make sure to select the right option from System Preferences > Language and Region

1. From the Apple Menu (top left corner of the screen) go to System Preferences > Keyboard.

2. Click the Input Sources tab and a list of available keyboards and input methods will appear.

3. Click on the plus button, select “Greek,” and add the “Greek” keyboard (not the “Greek Polytonic.”)

Adding a system language

5. Activating the Greek Keyboard on Your Mobile Phone and Tablet

Texting and searching in Greek will greatly help you master the language! Adding a Greek keyboard on your mobile phone and/or tablet is super-easy.

You could also opt to download an app instead of adding a keyboard. Read on for our suggestions.

Below are the instructions for both iOS and Android mobile phones and tablets.

1- iOS

1. Go to Settings > General > Keyboard.

2. Tap “Keyboards” and then “Add New Keyboard.”

3. Select “Greek” from the list.

4. When typing, you can switch between languages by tapping and holding on the icon to reveal the keyboard language menu.

2- Android

1. Go to Settings > General Management > Language and Input > On-screen Keyboard (or “Virtual Keyboard” on some devices) > Samsung Keyboard.

2. Tap “Language and Types” or “ + Select Input Languages” depending on the device and then “MANAGE INPUT LANGUAGES” if available.

3. Select “Ελληνικά” from the list.

4. When typing, you can switch between languages by swiping the space bar.

3- Applications for Mobile Phones

If you don’t want to add a keyboard on your mobile phone or tablet, this is a good app to consider:

6. Greek Keyboard Typing Tips

Typing in Greek can be very challenging at first! Therefore, we added here a few useful tips to make it easier to use your Greek keyboard.

A man typing on a computer

1- Computer

  • To add an accent mark over a vowel (ά, έ, ί, ή, ύ, ό, ώ) press the accentuation button (next to the letter L) once and then the vowel.
  • To add diaeresis over a vowel (αϊ, εϊ, οϋ) you need to press Right Shift + the accentuation button at the same time, and then the vowel ι or υ (these are the only ones that can get a diaeresis).
  • To add an accent mark and a diaeresis over a vowel (αΐ, εΐ) you need to press Right Alt + the accentuation button at the same time, and then ι or υ.
  • The Greek question mark looks like the English semicolon (;) and is found on the letter Q when your keyboard is set to Greek.
  • The Greek quotation marks are angled («»). You get them by pressing Right Alt + the [ key or Right Alt + the ] key.

2- Mobile Phones

  • On mobile devices, hold the vowel key and select the type of accentuation from the menu that pops up in order to add the accent mark.

7. How to Practice Typing Greek

As you probably know by now, learning Greek is all about practice, practice, and more practice! Strengthen your Greek typing skills by writing comments on any of our lesson pages, and our teacher will answer. If you’re a GreekPod101 Premium PLUS member, you can directly text our teacher via the My Teacher app—use your Greek keyboard to do this!

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Secret Revealed: The Best Way to Learn a Language on Your Own

Learning A Language on Your Own

Can You Really Learn Greek Alone?

Learning a language on your own or without traditional classroom instruction may seem quite daunting at first. What if you run into questions? How do you stay motivated and on track to achieving goals?

Don’t worry, not only is it possible to learn Greek or any language without traditional classroom instruction: GreekPod101 has created the world’s most advanced and extensive online language learning system. Not only is GreekPod101 specifically designed to help you with learning a language on your own, it’s actually faster, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom options!

Let’s look at some of the benefits of learning Greek or any language alone.

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Also, don’t forget to download your free cheat sheet – How to Improve Your Language Skills too!

3 Reasons to Learn a Language Alone

Learning Alone

1. Learn at Your Own Pace and On Your Schedule

In today’s fast-paced world, there just isn’t time for traditional classroom instruction. Between getting to class and studying on some professor or teacher’s schedule, traditional classroom learning is simply impossible to fit in. But when you learn Greek alone, you can study in bed if you like and whenever suits your schedule best, making it far easier to actually reach your goal of learning and mastering the language.

2. Learning a Language on Your Own Reduces Stress and Anxiety

Speaking in front of a class, pop quizzes, and tests are just a few of the stressors you will encounter when you learn a language in a traditional classroom setting. Specifically, these are external stressors that often derail most people’s dream of learning a new language. But when you learn Greek alone, there are no external stressors. Without the external stress and anxiety, it becomes much easier and more exciting to study Greek and reach your very own goals—all on your own!

3. Learning Greek Alone Helps Improve Cognitive Function and Overall Success

Learning a language on your own is indeed more challenging in some ways than being taught in a traditional classroom setting. In fact, while classroom instruction requires more rote memorization and following instructions, studying a language on your own requires more problem-solving and higher cognitive function to self-teach lessons and hit goals. So while it’s more challenging and requires higher levels of cognition, teaching yourself a language pays dividends throughout life by better preparing you for social/work opportunities that arise.

How to Learn a Language on Your Own with GreekPod101

Learning with GreekPod101

1. Access to the World’s Largest Collection of Greek Audio & Video Lessons

The best way to learn a language on your own is to study from native speaking instructors. Ideally, you want audio and/or video lessons that teach vocabulary, grammar, and provide actual Greek conversations and dialogue to help you with pronunciation. GreekPod101 has hundreds of hours of HD audio and video lessons created by real Greek instructors and every lesson is presented by professional Greek actors for perfect pronunciation. Plus, all lessons can be accessed 24/7 via any mobile device with Internet access. And, if you download the PDF versions of each lesson, you can even study without Internet access once the lesson is stored on your device!

2. “Learning Paths” with Greek Courses Based Upon Your Exact Needs & Goals

Although GreekPod101 has more than thousands of video and audio lessons, you need not review each and every one to learn the language. In fact, GreekPod101 has developed a feature called “Learning Paths”. You simply tell us your goals and we will identify the best courses and study plan to help you reach them in the shortest time possible. So even though you are technically learning a language on your own, our team is always here to help and make sure you reach your goals FAST!

3. Advanced Learning Tools Reduce Learning Time and Boost Retention

When you have the right tools and Greek learning resources, it’s actually easy to teach yourself a language! In the past 10+ years, GreekPod101 has developed, tested, and refined more than 20 advanced learning tools to boost retention and reduce learning time, including:

  • Spaced Repetition Flashcards
  • Line-by-Line Dialogue Breakdown
  • Review Quizzes
  • Voice Recording Tools to Help Perfect Pronunciation
  • Teacher Feedback and Comments for Each Lesson
  • Greek Dictionary with Pronunciation
  • Free PDF Cheat Sheets
  • And Much More!

Armed with our growing collection of advanced learning tools, it’s truly a breeze to learn Greek alone and reach your goals!

Conclusion

Learning a language on your own is not only possible, it’s actually easier and more beneficial for you than traditional classroom instruction. In fact, when you learn Greek on your own you can study at your own pace, eliminate stress, and actually increase cognitive function.

GreekPod101 is the world’s most advanced online language learning system and a great resource to help you teach yourself a new language. With the world’s largest collection of HD audio and video lessons, more than 20 advanced learning tools, and customized “Learning Paths”, GreekPod101 makes learning a new language easier, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom instruction.

And the best part is: With GreekPod101, you can study in bed, your car, or wherever you have a few spare minutes of time. Create your Free Lifetime Account now and get a FREE ebook to help “kickstart” your dream of learning a language on your own below!

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Language Learning Tips: How to Avoid Awkward Silences

Avoid Awkward Silences

Yes, even beginners can quickly learn conversational Greek well enough to carry on real conversations with native speakers. Of course, beginners won’t be able to carry a conversation the same way they could in their native language. But, just knowing a few tips like which questions to ask to keep a conversation going are all you need to speak and interact with real native speakers! But before we get to specific suggestions, let’s first take a closer look at how having real Greek conversations is so vital to your mastery of the language.

Learning to Carry a Conversation is Vital to Mastery of Any Language

Communicating with other people is the very point of language and conversation is almost second nature in our native tongue. For beginners or anyone learning a new language, conversations aren’t easy at all and even simple Greek greetings can be intimidating and awkward.

However, there are 3 vital reasons why you should learn conversational Greek as quickly as possible:

  • Avoid Awkward Silences: Nothing kills a conversation faster than long periods of awkward silence, so you need practice and specific strategies to avoid them.
  • Improve the Flow of Conversation to Make a Better Impression: When you know what to say to keep a conversation going, communication becomes much easier and you make a better impression on your listener.
  • Master the Language Faster: Nothing will help you learn to speak Greek faster and truly master the language than having real conversations with native speakers. Conversations quickly expose you to slang, cultural expressions, and vocabulary that force you to absorb and assimilate information faster than any educational setting—and that’s a great thing!

But how can you possibly have real conversations with real Greek people if you are just starting out?

3 Conversation Strategies for Beginners

Conversation

1. Ask Questions to Keep a Conversation Going

For beginners and even more advanced speakers, the key is to learn to ask questions to keep a conversation going. Of course, they can’t be just random questions or else you may confuse the listener. But, by memorizing a few key questions and the appropriate time to use them, you can easily carry a conversation with minimal vocabulary or experience. And remember, the more Greek conversations you have, the quicker you will learn and master the language!

2. Learn Core Vocabulary Terms as Quickly as Possible

You don’t need to memorize 10,000’s of words to learn conversational Greek. In fact, with just a couple hundred Greek words you could have a very basic Greek conversation. And by learning maybe 1,000-2,000 words, you could carry a conversation with a native speaker about current events, ordering in restaurants, and even getting directions.

3. Study Videos or Audio Lessons that You Can Play and Replay Again and Again

If you want to know how to carry a conversation in Greek, then you need exposure to native speakers—and the more the better. Ideally, studying video or audio lessons is ideal because they provide contextualized learning in your native language and you can play them again and again until mastery.

GreekPod101 Makes it Easier and More Convenient Than Ever to Learn Conversational Greek

Learning Greek

For more than 10 years, GreekPod101 has been helping students learn to speak Greek by creating the world’s most advanced online language learning system. Here are just a few of the specific features that will help you learn conversational Greek fast using our proven system:

  • The Largest Collection of HD Video & Audio Lessons from Real Greek Instructors: GreekPod101 instructors have created hundreds of video and audio lessons that you can play again and again. And the best part is: They don’t just teach you Greek vocabulary and grammar, they are designed to help you learn to speak Greek and teach you practical everyday topics like shopping, ordering, etc!
  • Pronunciation Tools: Use this feature to record and compare yourself with native speakers to quickly improve your pronunciation and fluency!
  • 2000 Common Greek Words: Also known as our Core List, these 2,000 words are all you need to learn to speak fluently and carry a conversation with a native speaker!

In all, more than 20 advanced learning tools help you quickly build vocabulary and learn how to carry a conversation with native speakers—starting with your very first lesson.

Conclusion

Although it may seem intimidating for a beginner, the truth is that it is very easy to learn conversational Greek. By learning a few core vocabulary terms and which questions to ask to keep a conversation going, just a little practice and exposure to real Greek conversations or lessons is all it really takes. GreekPod101 has created the world’s largest online collection of video and audio lessons by real instructors plus loads of advanced tools to help you learn to speak Greek and carry a conversation quickly.

Act now and we’ll also include a list of the most commonly used questions to keep a conversation going so you can literally get started immediately!