Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Grammar

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Συγγνώμη.

In how many different languages can you say "I am sorry"?

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 08:44 AM
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Hi Alex,


Great question!


Basically, γ in compound words such as συγχωρώ, συγγνώμη (the first γ), έγγραφο (the first γ) etc., is pronounced with nasalisation, like an "n" sound.

These words etymologically consist of prepositions that end in an "n" sound:

συγχωρώ ← συγχωρέω (ancient Greek) ← συγ- (← σύν) + χωρέω

συγγνώμη ← συγγιγνώσκω (ancient Greek) ← συγ- (← σύν) + γιγνώσκω

έγγραφο ← έγγραφος ← εγγράφω ← εγ- (← εν) + γράφω


When the compounds merge, the final "n" of συν and εν gets assimilated and becomes γ. Its pronunciation, however, doesn't really become γ. It's still "n".


Here's a pronunciation lesson about consonants were you will see this assimilation happening in some of the words:

https://www.greekpod101.com/2015/03/20/ultimate-greek-pronunciation-guide-5-consonants-part-2/


I hope this clears out any confusion :)


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Alex
Friday at 11:50 PM
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In "Με συγχωρείτε", the γ before χ seems to sound like "n", but I cannot find any rule to explain it. Is there a rule? ?

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 04:25 PM
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Hi Bibiana,


In that case it's better to say:

μην ανησυχείτε

δεν πειράζει

παρακαλώ (if you are making space for someone to pass or providing a seat)

you can also repeat συγγνώμη/με συγχωρείτε if you were in someone's way for example.


In a more friendly situation you can say συγχωρεμένος/συγχωρεμένη meaning "you are forgiven" when someone is apologising to you.


Τίποτα goes better as an answer to ευχαριστώ. It's an abbreviation of "δεν κάνει τίποτα" (lit. "it costs nothing" implying that it didn't cost you anything to do the thing you are being thanked for).


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Bibiana
Sunday at 07:57 PM
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In 8 languages :grin:


When somebody says to you συγνωμη or με συγχωρείτε, you can answer also "τίποτα" - nothing, right?