Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Iro: Γεια σας! Εγώ είμαι η Ηρώ.
Judith: Judith here. Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 20; It’s a Small Greek Taverna After All. Hello and welcome to GreekPod101.com, the fastest, easiest way and most fun way to learn Greek.
Iro: I’m Iro and thanks again for being here with us for this Absolute Beginner lesson.
Judith: In this lesson you will learn how to talk about old friends.
Iro: This conversation takes place at a cafe in Athens.
Judith: The conversation is between Ellie, Petros, another man and later Andrea.
Iro: The speakers all know each other therefore they will be speaking informal Greek.
Judith: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUES
Έλλη:Δε μου αρέσει αυτή η ταβέρνα. Δεν έχει πολλά τραπέζια. Επίσης, όλοι οι άντρες καπνίζουν.
Πέτρος:Έχει όμως πολύ καλό φαγητό. Να ένα τραπέζι για δύο. Έλα.
Ένας άντρας:Έλλη, Έλλη!
Έλλη:Α, ο κύριος Ηλίας! Γεια σας κύριε Ηλία, τι κάνετε;
Κύριος Ηλίας:Καλά, Έλλη μου, εσύ;
Έλλη:Μια χαρά. Κύριε Ηλία, αυτός είναι ο Πέτρος. Πέτρο, ο κύριος Ηλίας και ο πατέρας μου είναι γείτονες.
Κύριος Ηλίας-Πέτρος:Χαίρω πολύ.
Έλλη:Τι κάνουν η κυρία Ειρήνη και η αδερφή της; Είναι εδώ;
Κύριος Ηλίας:Όχι, είναι στο σπίτι. Λοιπόν Έλλη, βλέπω το Νίκο, το αγόρι σου από το σχολείο. Έχει δύο μαγαζιά τώρα και πηγαίνουν πολύ καλά. Εσύ Κώστα δουλεύεις ή σπουδάζεις;
Πέτρος:Πέτρος, όχι Κώστας.
Έλλη:Ο Πέτρος είναι δάσκαλος.
Κύριος Ηλίας:Α, καλά. Λοιπόν ο Νίκος …
Πέτρος:Α, η Αντρέα! Αντρέα, Αντρέα!
Αντρέα:Γεια σας!
Πέτρος:Έλα στο τραπέζι μας.
Αντρέα:Ευχαριστώ.
Έλλη:Η Αντρέα είναι μια φίλη μας από τη Γερμανία.
Κύριος Ηλίας:Από τη Γερμανία; Ωραία. Λοιπόν, παιδιά, χάρηκα. Καλή όρεξη!
Πέτρος-Έλλη:Επίσης.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Έλλη:Δε μου αρέσει αυτή η ταβέρνα. Δεν έχει πολλά τραπέζια. Επίσης, όλοι οι άντρες καπνίζουν.
Πέτρος:Έχει όμως πολύ καλό φαγητό. Να ένα τραπέζι για δύο. Έλα.
Ένας άντρας:Έλλη, Έλλη!
Έλλη:Α, ο κύριος Ηλίας! Γεια σας κύριε Ηλία, τι κάνετε;
Κύριος Ηλίας:Καλά, Έλλη μου, εσύ;
Έλλη:Μια χαρά. Κύριε Ηλία, αυτός είναι ο Πέτρος. Πέτρο, ο κύριος Ηλίας και ο πατέρας μου είναι γείτονες.
Κύριος Ηλίας-Πέτρος:Χαίρω πολύ.
Έλλη:Τι κάνουν η κυρία Ειρήνη και η αδερφή της; Είναι εδώ;
Κύριος Ηλίας:Όχι, είναι στο σπίτι. Λοιπόν Έλλη, βλέπω το Νίκο, το αγόρι σου από το σχολείο. Έχει δύο μαγαζιά τώρα και πηγαίνουν πολύ καλά. Εσύ Κώστα δουλεύεις ή σπουδάζεις;
Πέτρος:Πέτρος, όχι Κώστας.
Έλλη:Ο Πέτρος είναι δάσκαλος.
Κύριος Ηλίας:Α, καλά. Λοιπόν ο Νίκος …
Πέτρος:Α, η Αντρέα! Αντρέα, Αντρέα!
Αντρέα:Γεια σας!
Πέτρος:Έλα στο τραπέζι μας.
Αντρέα:Ευχαριστώ.
Έλλη:Η Αντρέα είναι μια φίλη μας από τη Γερμανία.
Κύριος Ηλίας:Από τη Γερμανία; Ωραία. Λοιπόν, παιδιά, χάρηκα. Καλή όρεξη!
Πέτρος-Έλλη:Επίσης.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Έλλη:Δε μου αρέσει αυτή η ταβέρνα. Δεν έχει πολλά τραπέζια. Επίσης, όλοι οι άντρες καπνίζουν.
Judith:I don't like this café. It doesn't have many tables. Also, all of the men are smoking.
Πέτρος:Έχει όμως πολύ καλό φαγητό. Να ένα τραπέζι για δύο. Έλα.
Judith:It has very good food though. There's a table for two. Come.
Ένας άντρας:Έλλη, Έλλη!
Judith:Elli, Elli!
Έλλη:Α, ο κύριος Ηλίας! Γεια σας κύριε Ηλία, τι κάνετε;
Judith:Ah, Mr. Ilias! Hello Mr. Ilia, how are you?
Κύριος Ηλίας:Καλά, Έλλη μου, εσύ;
Judith:Well, my Elli, you?
Έλλη:Μια χαρά. Κύριε Ηλία, αυτός είναι ο Πέτρος. Πέτρο, ο κύριος Ηλίας και ο πατέρας μου είναι γείτονες.
Judith:Just fine. Mr. Ilia, this is Peter. Peter, Mr. Ilias and my father are neighbors.
Κύριος Ηλίας-Πέτρος:Χαίρω πολύ.
Judith:Nice to meet you.
Έλλη:Τι κάνουν η κυρία Ειρήνη και η αδερφή της; Είναι εδώ;
Judith:How are Mrs. Eirini and her sister? Are they here?
Κύριος Ηλίας:Όχι, είναι στο σπίτι. Λοιπόν Έλλη, βλέπω το Νίκο, το αγόρι σου από το σχολείο. Έχει δύο μαγαζιά τώρα και πηγαίνουν πολύ καλά. Εσύ Κώστα δουλεύεις ή σπουδάζεις;
Judith:No, they're at home. So Elli, I see Nick, your boyfriend from school. He has two stores now, and they're going very well. You, Kosta, do you work or study?
Πέτρος:Πέτρος, όχι Κώστας.
Judith:Peter, not Kostas.
Έλλη:Ο Πέτρος είναι δάσκαλος.
Judith:Peter is a teacher.
Κύριος Ηλίας:Α, καλά. Λοιπόν ο Νίκος …
Judith:Ah, good. So Nick…
Πέτρος:Α, η Αντρέα! Αντρέα, Αντρέα!
Judith:Ah, Andrea! Andrea, Andrea!
Αντρέα:Γεια σας!
Judith:Hello!
Πέτρος:Έλα στο τραπέζι μας.
Judith:Come to our table.
Αντρέα:Ευχαριστώ.
Judith:Thanks.
Έλλη:Η Αντρέα είναι μια φίλη μας από τη Γερμανία.
Judith:Andrea is a friend of ours from Germany.
Κύριος Ηλίας:Από τη Γερμανία; Ωραία. Λοιπόν, παιδιά, χάρηκα. Καλή όρεξη!
Judith:From Germany? Nice. So, guys, I was glad [to see you]. Bon appétit!
Πέτρος-Έλλη:Επίσης.
Judith:Likewise.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Judith: Okay, maybe it’s time to talk about women in Greece.
Iro: Although women and men are politically and socially equal in Greece, there are still some people, of course, older one and in small villages who believe that men should work and women should always stay at home taking care of the children and everything.
Judith: Yeah, I guess it’s the idea that the men should provide a comfortable life for his wife, right?
Iro: Something like that, yes.
Judith: The Women’s Rights Movement started in the 19th Century and the first female student was accepted to a Greek University in 1890. That’s quite a history of women’s rights.
Iro: Yeah. In the 1920’s women’s unions were organized in many big cities. Women demanding their Civil Rights, the recognition of motherhood outside of marriage and the right to live, work and to be treated as equal members of society.
Judith: Their claims scared the conservative society overtime and they met severe opposition from most politicians and political parties. Also from the church, and even from parts of female population.
Iro: The Constitution of 1927 recognized gender equality and although women could vote, they could not be elected for political office. It was not until 1952 that all of Women’s Civil Rights were guaranteed by law.
Judith: Greece’s entrance into the European Union opened up new horizons in the realm of women’s rights and gender equality. The most important achievement of the Greek Women’s Rights Movement is that it broke down the expectations for traditional family roles, as well as officially criminalizing certain behaviors that were previously socially acceptable such as abuse and rape.
VOCAB LIST
Judith: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is?
Iro: ταβέρνα
Judith: Traditional Greek restaurant.
Iro: ταβέρνα
Judith: Next.
Iro: επίσης
Judith: Also, likewise.
Iro: επίσης
Judith: Next.
Iro: άντρας
Judith: Man.
Iro: άντρας
Judith: Next.
Iro: καπνίζω
Judith: To smoke.
Iro: καπνίζω
Judith: Next.
Iro: πατέρας
Judith: Father.
Iro: πατέρας
Judith: Next.
Iro: γείτονας
Judith: Neighbor.
Iro: γείτονας
Judith: Next.
Iro: σπίτι
Judith: Home or house
Iro: σπίτι
Judith: This word is neuter. Next.
Iro: αγόρι
Judith: Boy.
Iro: αγόρι
Judith: Counter-intuitively, this one is also a neuter. Next.
Iro: μαγαζί
Judith: Store or shop.
Iro: μαγαζί
Judith: Again, neuter. Next.
Iro: φίλη
Judith: female friend.
Iro: φίλη
Judith: Next.
Iro: όρεξη
Judith: Appetite.
Iro: όρεξη
Judith: Again, feminine.
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Judith: Now let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Iro: The first phrase we’ll look at is "Καλή όρεξη".
Judith: It’s a Greek expression that literally means, “good appetite.” This might sound strange to you but the Greeks are no different from the French, the Italians and the Germans who all wish each other a good appetite before eating. In fact, the French expression “bon appétit” which you are probably familiar with, means just that.
Iro: "Φίλος" is a male friend and "φίλη" is a female friend. Several words just swap their -ος for an -η ending to create the feminine form. The word "αδερφός" is another example of this. "Αδερφός" is “brother”, and "αδερφή" means “sister.”
GRAMMAR POINT
Judith: The focus of this lesson are -ι and -ας nouns.
Iro: In this lesson, we looked at more types of nouns.
Judith: We already had neuter Greek nouns ending in -ο, for example, those are straightforward. They don’t change in the accusative and plural ending is -α.
Iro: There is a second really common ending for neuter nouns, however.
Judith: Neuter nouns that end in -ι that is γιώτα, as opposed to feminine nouns which end in -η, which is spelled ήτα.
Iro: Neuter nouns that end in -ι don’t change in the accusative either but the plural ending is -ια. For example, το σπίτι, στο σπίτι.
Judith: That’s accusative.
Iro: τα σπίτια
Judith: Plural. So they’re almost the same as what we had before. We should also cover the group of masculine nouns that end in -ας.
Iro: Yes, like the name Κώστας or the word γείτονας.
Judith: Neighbor.
Iro: Just like the masculine nouns ending in -ος, the -ας nouns drop the final S for accusative.
Judith: ο γείτονας - με τον γείτονα.
Iro: For plural, these nouns get the ending “ES” that is -ες as if they were feminine nouns. “S” is also the plural accusative ending.
Judith: ο γείτονας - οι γείτονες
Iro: So you’ve learned about neuter nouns that end in -ι, and masculine nouns that end in -ας.
Judith: Don’t worry, there won’t be too many more. We’ve covered almost all the common noun types.
Iro: And really there aren’t many changes to keep track of. You’ll be fine.
Judith: That just about does it for today.
Iro: Attention iPhone, iPod or iPad users. Listen, tap and swipe your way to fluency with our Greek language apps.
Judith: Grow your vocabulary and practice on the go with our Greek language applications.
Iro: Fun and easy to use. Greek apps are available on iTunes.
Judith: Visit our iPhone page on GreekPod101.com/iphone to learn more.
Iro: Okay. See you next time.

Grammar

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10 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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How is the women and men equality in your country?

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 09:02 AM
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Hi Elisabeth,


Thank you for your kind comment :) It's great that you read the comment section! You can find lots of interest topics here and there that might be helpful sometimes.


All the best,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Elisabeth
Monday at 02:37 AM
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Wow! Thank you for the discussion below, very interesting!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 07:37 AM
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Hi Elias,


και and κι are the same thing. We use κι when the word that follows starts with an /a/o/e/u/ vowel sound.


I'm glad that you appreciate Greece so much and that your experiences in my country are positive?. I do believe people in Greece are kind and more hospitable than some other Europeans.


I think Bibiana was focusing more on the rights of women and to be honest what she describes, specially about mothers-in-law being too bossy and involved and stay-at-home mothers is still a reality in many families. Especially in the rural areas and among older generations (and we do have a large number of old people in Greece. It's a demographic issue).


Things in the cities are more modern and advanced socially, of course, and younger guys finally have realised that they also need to help around the house and work as do their partners, but, for example, most men around my father's generation expect women to be fully dedicated to the house and the children while they are the ones that support the house financially. I think it's a matter of pride that their work alone is enough to support the house. Religion also affects this behaviour because every time a couple marries in the church, the priest says "the woman should revere her husband." Actually there's a Greek comedy movie with that title that pictures what I'm saying exactly:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/And_the_Wife_Shall_Revere_Her_Husband

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgpLHb_HcHM


I hope you can get to watch it sometime if you find it online. You will see better what Bibiana and I are saying. But overall, it's a really nice and nostalgic movie?.


Unfortunately, this shift of a generation of stay-at-home mothers to a generation where women and mothers in general have more freedom and work is not due to a cultural shift from a man-centered society to a pro-equality one. It has mainly to do with the gradual worsening of the economy. Women were in a way "forced" to work and bring income due to ever rising costs of life (especially after the introduction of the euro). Due to these costs, it's also difficult for young people to leave their homes and become independent, form families etc. As a result we have a generation of 30+ year olds, many unemployed, that still live with their parents, birth rates are very low and the ones that managed to move out and form families still have strong bonds with their parents which leads to problems sometimes when the in-laws get involved too much. It's what we famously call in Greek "η ελληνίδα μάνα" and "η ελληνίδα πεθερά" because we are aware that these personas are not just "urban legends" it's a reality!


I really do hope you will keep enjoying your visits to my beautiful Greece!


Regards,

Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Elias
Tuesday at 02:29 AM
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With respect to Bibiana's comment, Greece not only is behind the other European countries but also is more advanced when it comes to social life. Whenever i travel to Greece and meet Greek people i feel the spirit of life and respect and kindness something that you can never experience in other European countries if not in the world. I have been almost in all other European countries and none of them is like Greece so kind, respectful with open arms and tolerance. That is why i travel to Greece at least once in a year. ??

Elias
Tuesday at 02:00 AM
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Hi there,

Is "kal" equal to "kl" ?

Thanks.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 05:51 PM
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Hi Bibiana,


I agree, rural societies in Greece are still the way you described they are. As for smoking, tobacco was introduced in Greece at the end of the 16th century. We were under the Turkish yoke at that time and I assume it became a habit from the Turks as they smoked (and still do) nargile (shisha).


This bad habit is out of control unfortunately. No real restrictions. I wonder how difficult it is for a family with babies and kids to find an indoors restaurant or cafe in the winter that is not stuffed with smoke.


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Bibiana
Monday at 08:34 AM
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Well, I think women still dont have the same rights as men... Maybe oficially yes, and of course in big cities it must be different, but what I experienced in a small island with a close and traditional society, is that women´s role are still the same... so to say - be at home, cook and raise children. Greek society is still very traditional and somehow they are many years behind other European countries... Which has of course its pros and cons. But this part I dont like... and also if a girl marries a Greek man (lets say a foerign girl, but can be Greek too) she quite of becomes a slave... and the family will tell her what to do... especially her mother-in-law. And not only this, also if a couple or a family has a business - restaurant, or whatever, the woman works all day and the man usually doesnt do anything... I experienced that :D


And one more "traditional" thing... the conversation reminded me of smoking... Why all the Greeks smoke?! Its hard to find 2 people among 100 who dont smoke... Does it have any special reason?

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 02:28 AM
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Hi Wil,


Thank you for your comment and for asking us about this.


The reason why you see sample sentences with grammar you possibly have not learned yet is because of the structure of the content in our database. Basically, in the database every vocab entry is attached with a sample sentence which is general and doesn't belong to a specific level or series. If that vocab will be used in any of the lessons (of any series), it will always show that sample sentence.


I absolutely understand your point though. At the beginner levels just try to treat those sample sentences as sentences that give you an idea of how that vocab works in a sentence in terms of context and position, without worrying too much about the exact grammatical details. Later when your grammar knowledge will be stronger it will all start making sense.


Of course if you have any questions about grammar, we are always here to help, so don't hesitate to leave us comments with questions.


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Wil
Thursday at 01:47 AM
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Hello,


First of all I would like to say, that I am enjoying the lessons very much.

I do wonder why in the sample sentences the past tense is used. We have not learned about that yet, but in every lessons I come across them. Just wondering, thanks in advance for your answer.


Kind regards,


Wil