Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to GreekPod101.com. This is Upper Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 9 - You’ve Got Friends in All the Right Places in Greece! Eric here.
Chrissi: Γεια σας. I'm Chrissi.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to conjugate A conjugation verbs in the simple future, perfect, pluperfect, and future perfect tenses of the passive voice. The conversation takes place on a beach on Mykonos island.
Chrissi: It's between Katerina and Eva.
Eric: The speakers are colleagues and now also friends, so they'll be using informal Greek. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Κατερίνα: Ωραία που είναι τελικά αυτή η δουλειά! Τελειώνεις την πρωινή σου βάρδια και η παραλία είναι στα πόδια σου! Θα κάνω ένα μαύρισμα!
Εύα: Μέχρι το τέλος της σεζόν, θα έχεις γίνει μαύρη σίγουρα!
Κατερίνα: Έχεις σκεφτεί τι θέλεις να κάνουμε πιο μετά; Έλεγα να πηγαίναμε για φαγητό έξω. Να μη φάμε μεσημεριανό στο πλοίο σήμερα.
Εύα: ΟΚ. Πάμε τότε σε μια ταβέρνα που ξέρω.
Κατερίνα: Εδώ κοντά;
Εύα: Όχι. Πρέπει να πάρουμε το λεωφορείο και να κατέβουμε στη χώρα. Ο ιδιοκτήτης λέγεται κυρ Μιχάλης και με ξέρει από πρόπερσι. Κάθε φορά που πηγαίνω μου κάνει καλές τιμές. Θα σ' τον γνωρίσω.
Κατερίνα: Βεβαίως και να μου τον γνωρίσεις! Φαντάζομαι εσύ πρέπει να έχεις κονέ σε κάθε λιμάνι!
Εύα: Ε, θες δεν θες κάποια στιγμή μαθαίνεις τους ντόπιους και σε μαθαίνουν και αυτοί. Το καλύτερο είναι όταν ξεκινάει η σεζόν που τους ξαναβλέπεις όλους!
: Είναι σαν να έχεις φίλους σε κάθε μέρος, που όποτε και να γυρίσεις πίσω, αυτοί θα είναι εκεί. Σαν να μην πέρασε μια μέρα!
Κατερίνα: Ακούγεται πολύ όμορφο αυτό...
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Katerina: This job is so nice! You finish your morning shift and the beach is right at your feet! I'm going to get a great tan!
Eva: Between now and the end of the season you'll have tanned a lot for sure!
Katerina: Have you thought about what you want to do later? I was thinking of eating out. No lunch on the ship for today.
Eva: OK. Let's go to a taverna I know then.
Katerina: Nearby?
Eva: No. We need to take the shuttle bus and go into town. The owner is called Mr. Mihalis and he's known me for two years. Every time I go he gives me a good price. I'll introduce you to him.
Katerina: Introduce him to me, please! I imagine that you have connections in every port!
Eva: Well, whether you want to or not, at some point you get to know the locals and they get to know you. The best thing is when the season starts and you see everyone again!
: It's like having friends everywhere, and whenever you come back, they will be there. As if not a single day passed by!
Katerina: That sounds very beautiful...
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Chrissi, which island in Greece do you like the most?
Chrissi: So many! It's hard to choose! But I think there's something special about Mykonos. It's in the Cyclades and although it's infamous for its nightlife, I think that everyone, even families, can enjoy their time there. I love Little Venice, an area in the main town, that’s famous for its windmills and crystal clear waters.
Eric: I heard that it used to be an island of poor fishermen, but after the 60s it began to attract rich and famous people from all over the world and became more cosmopolitan.
Chrissi: I see you've done your homework! Today it's not unusual to stroll along the narrow streets of Chora, the main town, and see a celebrity walking casually past you!
Eric: Sounds like it's not an island for people travelling on a budget.
Chrissi: That’s true! Be prepared for high prices, boutique hotels and shops, and fancy restaurants. Despite that, however, I absolutely recommend visiting Mykonos at least once in your life.
Eric: I'll make sure to write that down on my bucket list then! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Chrissi: βάρδια [natural native speed]
Eric: shift
Chrissi: βάρδια [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: βάρδια [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: μαύρος [natural native speed]
Eric: black, dark colored, miserable, poor (metaphorically)
Chrissi: μαύρος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: μαύρος [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: κατεβαίνω [natural native speed]
Eric: to descend, to get off, to go down
Chrissi: κατεβαίνω[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: κατεβαίνω [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: χώρα [natural native speed]
Eric: country, land
Chrissi: χώρα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: χώρα [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: κυρ [natural native speed]
Eric: Mr, colloquial
Chrissi: κυρ [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: κυρ [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: τιμή [natural native speed]
Eric: price
Chrissi: τιμή [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: τιμή [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: γνωρίζω [natural native speed]
Eric: to recognize, to know
Chrissi: γνωρίζω [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: γνωρίζω [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: φαντάζομαι [natural native speed]
Eric: to imagine, to guess, to think
Chrissi: φαντάζομαι [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: φαντάζομαι [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: κονέ [natural native speed]
Eric: connection, acquaintance (slangs)
Chrissi: κονέ [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: κονέ [natural native speed]
Eric: And last...
Chrissi: ντόπιος [natural native speed]
Eric: local (as in, a person from an area)
Chrissi: ντόπιος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: ντόπιος [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Chrissi: The adjective μαύρος.
Eric: Which means “black, dark colored.” For example…
Chrissi: Για πρωινό μου αρέσει να τρώω μαύρο ψωμί.
Eric: This sentence means “For breakfast I like to eat brown bread.” Listeners, you can also use this word metaphorically to refer to things that aren't really black, if you want to say they're“miserable” or “poor.”
Chrissi: Right. For example: Ζω μαύρη ζωή.
Eric: “I live a miserable life.”
Chrissi: Or you can say Μου έκανες μαύρη την καρδιά.
Eric: Which means “You depressed me.”
Chrissi: In our dialogue, μαύρος was also used with the meaning of “tanned.” Μέχρι το τέλος της σεζόν, θα έχεις γίνει μαύρη σίγουρα!
Eric: Meaning “Between now and the end of the season you will have tanned a lot for sure!”
Chrissi: Μαύρος doesn’t have any racist connotations in Greek, it's just a way to say “tanned,” so you shouldn't feel uncomfortable using this expression.
Eric: Okay, what's next?
Chrissi: The expression κάνω καλή τιμή.
Eric: Which means “to give a discount.”
Chrissi: Κάνω καλή τιμή consists of the verb κάνω...
Eric: “to do or to make,”
Chrissi: ...the adjective καλή...
Eric: ...meaning “good”...
Chrissi: ...and the noun τιμή.
Eric: Which is the word for “price.” All together it literally means “to make a good price” or in other words “to give a discount” or to "lower the price." You can use this expression in any situation, formal or informal.
Eric: Chrissi, can you give us an example using this expression?
Chrissi: Sure. For example, you can say Μπορείτε να μου κάνετε καλύτερη τιμή σε αυτό το δαχτυλίδι;
Eric: Meaning “Can you give me a discount on this ring?” Okay, what's the next phrase?
Chrissi: Έχω κονέ.
Eric: This is a slang expression that means “to have a connection or an acquaintance” or “to have connections or acquaintances.”
Chrissi: Κονέ means “connection” and it can be used either with the verb έχω, meaning “to have,” or with the verb κάνω, meaning “to make.”
Eric: So, “I have connections” in Greek will be…
Chrissi: Έχω κονέ.
Eric: And “I make connections” is…
Chrissi: Κάνω κονέ.
Eric: You can use this phrase only in informal situations with people you are close to and who won't judge you, because this does sound a bit like street language. Chrissi, can you give us an example using this phrase?
Chrissi: Sure. Για να γίνεις καλή στις δημόσιες σχέσεις πρέπει κατ' αρχάς να έχεις πολλά κονέ.
Eric: Which means “In order for you to be good at public relations, you need first of all to have a lot of connections.” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to conjugate A conjugation verbs in the simple future, perfect, pluperfect, and future perfect tenses of the passive voice.
Chrissi: Τhese are the verbs that end in -ομαι. To form them in these tenses you will need a secret ingredient – The passive voice aorist verb stem. In order to get it, you need to do the following-
Eric: First, find the present tense stem of the verb.
Chrissi: Second, convert the present tense stem to an active voice aorist stem. This will be sigmatic or asigmatic.
Eric: Third, convert that stem into the passive voice aorist stem. It's as easy as 1-2-3.
Chrissi: We examined the rules on how to do these conversions in our previous lessons.
Eric: Right. Now let's see an example.
Chrissi: Let’s take the regular verb γνωρίζομαι.
Eric: “To become acquainted.” The present tense stem is…
Chrissi: Γνωριζ-. The stem character here is the sibilant consonant ζ…
Eric: ...which results in a sigmatic active voice aorist ending in...
Chrissi: -σα. So we have γνώρισα.
Eric: So the passive voice aorist stem is…
Chrissi: Γνωριστ-. So we end up with γνωρίστηκα.
Eric: Great! Listeners, you can find information about what to do in the case of deponent verbs in the lesson notes. Now let's move on to the formation of the passive voice simple future tense. Here's how to form it…
Chrissi: You will need the particle θα plus the passive voice aorist verb stem with the ending -ώ, -είς, -εί, -ούμε, -είτε, -ούν or ούνε.
Eric: For example, let's take the same verb again…
Chrissi: γνωρίζομαι
Eric: “to become acquainted.” The passive voice simple future tense will be…
Chrissi: Θα γνωριστώ, θα γνωριστείς, θα γνωριστεί, θα γνωριστούμε, θα γνωριστείτε, θα γνωριστούν or θα γνωριστούνε.
Eric: Ok. How do we form the passive voice perfect tense?
Chrissi: For the formation of this tense you need the auxiliary verb έχω, “to have,” in the present tense plus the passive voice infinitive.
Eric: The passive voice infinitive has the same form for all persons.
Chrissi: Right. It is the passive voice aorist verb stem plus the ending -εί.
Eric: Ok, Chrissi, let's conjugate the same verb in the passive voice perfect tense.
Chrissi: Sure. Έχω γνωριστεί, έχεις γνωριστεί, έχει γνωριστεί, έχουμε γνωριστεί, έχετε γνωριστεί, έχουν γνωριστεί or έχουνε γνωριστεί. To form the passive voice pluperfect tense, you use the passive voice infinitive again and the same auxiliary verb έχω, “to have” but conjugated in the past tense.
Eric: For example…
Chrissi: Είχα γνωριστεί, είχες γνωριστεί, είχε γνωριστεί, είχαμε γνωριστεί, είχατε γνωριστεί, είχαν γνωριστεί or είχανε γνωριστεί.
Eric: And our last tense for this lesson is the passive voice future perfect tense.
Chrissi: For the formation of this tense, you need θα plus the auxiliary verb έχω in the present tense plus the passive voice infinitive.
Eric: For example…
Chrissi: Θα έχω γνωριστεί, θα έχεις γνωριστεί, θα έχει γνωριστεί, θα έχουμε γνωριστεί, θα έχετε γνωριστεί, θα έχουν γνωριστεί or θα έχουνε γνωριστεί. Listeners, you will find more examples in the lesson notes.
Eric: It sounds very similar to the passive voice perfect tense.
Chrissi: Right. They both use the passive voice infinitive and the auxiliary verb in the present tense, but, in the passive voice present tense, θα comes first.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Chrissi: Γεια χαρά!

8 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
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What's the most popular tourist attraction in your town?

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 05:50 PM
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Hi Elias,


Greece is the best country in the world = Η Ελλάδα είναι η καλύτερη χώρα στον κόσμο.

(πιο καλή would be grammatically correct but that sounds more like "nicest/most nice", as in "nice person" rather than "best")


You wouldn't need καλά (adverb meaning "well") here because you need an adjective to define the noun "χώρα", not an adverb. Otherwise your sentence would sound like: Greece is the most well country in the world. (incorrect!) Same for καλύτερα (adverb).


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Elias
Tuesday at 10:38 PM
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Thanks Stefania,

Just to make sure, so if i want to say " Greece is the best country in the world" i should say "Η Ελλάδα είναι η πιο καλά χώρα στον κόσμο. "

I should not say "Η Ελλάδα είναι η πιο καλή χώρα στον κόσμο."?


Although i believe i can say like this too: Η Ελλάδα είναι η καλύτερα χώρα στον κόσμο.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 11:56 AM
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Hi Elias,


That's a good question.


It shouldn't be καλή because καλά here is not an adjective giving an attribute to a noun (παραλία, i.e ≠good beach=καλή παραλία), it's an adverb defining the adjective κρυμμένη (well-hidden). Let me rephrase:

Η παραλία είναι καλά κρυμμένη. The beach is well-hidden.


So this καλά is like saying είμαι καλά, I'm well (adverb), not είμαι καλός, I'm nice (adjective).


And of course you can go clubbing in Gazi or Psiri! Foreigner or not, there are no restrictions. So many tourists go clubbing all the time. But whether you'll eat πόρτα or not in the few clubs that still do it, well, that depends on a lot of things so I can't guarantee you they'll let you in ?. Although, to be honest, face control has been very limited over the last decade. It was much more intense in the 80's and the 90's. The revenue now is much less due to the crisis so the owners need all the clientele they can get and Greeks are also less willing to leave their precious and hard-earned money to clubs that don't respect their customers so they avoid them completely.


If you don't look like you're a trouble-maker (like when being overly drunk) and are neatly dressed, you should be fine in most places, even when unaccompanied.


If you do get denied to enter to some club, just forget about it and go somewhere else. It's not worth to give your money or get upset about an idiot doorman and owner that treat clients like that. If I were you and they would even tell me to wait in line, I would just leave.


I hope you'll enjoy your nights out in Athens!


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Elias
Monday at 01:31 AM
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Hi Stefania,


Αυτή είναι η πιο ("καλά") κρυμμένη παραλία της Κρήτης = This is the most well-hidden beach of Crete.


It shouldn't be καλή instead of καλά?

Αυτή είναι η πιο ("καλή") κρυμμένη παραλία της Κρήτης = This is the most well-hidden beach of Crete.


An unrelated question to this lesson. Can a non-Greek stranger go to a night club in Gazi or Psiri in Athens? The doormen don't stop stranger at the door? Δεν θέλω να τρώω πόρτα!??


Merci.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:35 AM
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Hi Nicole,


I guess you've figured out why it's μια ταβέρνα :)!


Cheers,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Nicole
Saturday at 10:47 AM
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sorry....nevermind!!!!

Nicole
Saturday at 10:17 AM
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shouldn't it be ένα ταβέρνα in the dialogue, not μια?