Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to GreekPod101.com. This is Upper Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 24 - Working on a Greek Cruise Ship is Paradise! Eric here.
Chrissi: Γεια σας. I'm Chrissi.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use conditionals. The conversation takes place on the aft deck of a cruise ship.
Chrissi: It's between Katerina and Eva.
Eric: The speakers are colleagues and friends, so they’ll be using informal Greek. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Εύα: Ουφ! Επιτέλους λίγη χαλάρωση! Σήμερα ήμουν κάτω από τον ήλιο όλη μέρα. Απορώ πώς δεν έπαθα ηλίαση!
Κατερίνα: Αφού δεν έπαθες ηλίαση τον Αύγουστο, τώρα τον Σεπτέμβριο θα πάθεις;
Εύα: Έχεις δίκιο. Εσύ τι έκανες όλη μέρα;
Κατερίνα: Όλο το πρωί ήμουν στην πισίνα κάνοντας διάφορες δραστηριότητες με τους επιβάτες.
: Το απόγευμα είχαμε δουλειά στο γραφείο και σε δύο ώρες πρέπει να ετοιμαστώ για το βράδυ.
Εύα: Α, ναι. Σήμερα είναι το κοκτέιλ πάρτι του καπετάνιου.
Κατερίνα: (αναστενάζει) Αν μου έλεγε κανείς πριν από δύο χρόνια ότι κάποια μέρα θα βρισκόμουν σε ένα κρουαζιερόπλοιο σαν και αυτό, τρώγοντας παγωτό, βλέποντας το ηλιοβασίλεμα και χαζεύοντας τα κύματα λίγο πριν ετοιμαστώ για το κοκτέιλ πάρτι του καπετάνιου, ε δεν θα τον πίστευα!
Εύα: Είδες πώς τα φέρνει η ζωή μερικές φορές; Γύρευε πού θα είσαι και τι θα κάνεις σε δύο χρόνια από τώρα.
Κατερίνα: Μακάρι να είμαι εδώ ακόμα!
Εύα: Αν θα είσαι εδώ, θα χαρώ πάρα πολύ φιλενάδα!
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Eva: Phew! Finally some relaxation! Today I was in the sun the entire day. I wonder how I didn’t get sunstroke!
Katerina: If you didn't get sunstroke during August, you're gonna get sunstroke now in September?
Eva: You're right. What did you do all day?
Katerina: All morning long I was at the pool area doing some activities with the passengers.
: In the afternoon we were busy at the office and in two hours I need to get ready for tonight.
Eva: Oh, yeah. Today is the captain's cocktail party.
Katerina: (sighs) If someone had told me two years ago that someday I would be on a cruise ship like this one, eating ice cream, watching the sunset and gazing at the waves just a while before I get myself ready for the captain's cocktail party, I would simply not believe him!
Eva: See what life brings you sometimes? Who knows where you'll be and what you will be doing in two years from now.
Katerina: I hope I will be here still!
Eva: If you are going to be here, I'll be very happy my friend!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Being on a cruise ship and eating ice cream sounds like paradise.
Chrissi: It does, doesn’t it?
Eric: Is ice cream popular in Greece?
Chrissi: Oh, yes! It can be traced back to the 5th century BC, when the Ancient Greeks ate snow mixed with honey and fruit.
Eric: I didn’t realize it had such a long history! What’s ice cream like in modern Greece?
Chrissi: It can easily be found in kiosks and supermarkets. But different kiosks sell different ice creams, so you may need to shop around to find a particular type.
Eric: Are ice cream shops popular?
Chrissi: They are. You can buy gelato, sorbet, called σορμπέ, or even Sicilian granita, called γρανίτα, style.
Eric: My favorite ice cream flavor is strawberry. What flavors can I find in Greece?
Chrissi: You’ll find the common flavors, such as chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. You should also try Kaimaki (καϊμάκι), which is unique but popular.
Eric: How do I ask for an ice cream cone in Greek?
Chrissi: The word for "cone" is χωνάκι and "cup" is κυπελλάκι.
Eric: Okay, I’m ready for summer in Greece! Now, onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Chrissi: χαλάρωση [natural native speed]
Eric: relaxation, slackening, flaccidity, sag
Chrissi: χαλάρωση[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: χαλάρωση [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Chrissi: απορώ [natural native speed]
Eric: to wonder, to be puzzled
Chrissi: απορώ[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: απορώ [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Chrissi: ηλίαση [natural native speed]
Eric: sunstroke
Chrissi: ηλίαση[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: ηλίαση [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Chrissi: δραστηριότητα [natural native speed]
Eric: activity, hobby
Chrissi: δραστηριότητα[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: δραστηριότητα [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Chrissi: δουλειά [natural native speed]
Eric: work, job, business
Chrissi: δουλειά[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: δουλειά [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Chrissi: κοκτέιλ [natural native speed]
Eric: cocktail
Chrissi: κοκτέιλ[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: κοκτέιλ [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have
Chrissi: ηλιοβασίλεμα [natural native speed]
Eric: sunset, sundown
Chrissi: ηλιοβασίλεμα[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: ηλιοβασίλεμα [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have
Chrissi: χαζεύω [natural native speed]
Eric: to browse (magazine), to gaze, to waste time, to laze, to daydream, to gape, to fool around
Chrissi: χαζεύω[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: χαζεύω [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Chrissi: κύμα [natural native speed]
Eric: wave, blast (shock wave), rush (for adrenaline)
Chrissi: κύμα[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: κύμα [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
Chrissi: γυρεύω [natural native speed]
Eric: to seek, to search for, to look for
Chrissi: γυρεύω[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: γυρεύω [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Chrissi: έχω δουλειά
Eric: meaning "I'm busy."
Eric: What can you tell us about this?
Chrissi: The literal meaning of this is “I have work.”
Eric: So we can use it to mean “I’m busy.”
Chrissi: Yes. δουλειά is a noun that can also be used for “business.”
Eric: Can this be used in both formal and informal Greek?
Chrissi: It’s okay to say this in casual situations, but in a formal situation it’s best to say είμαι απασχολημένος or είμαι απασχολημένη which literally means "I'm occupied."
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Chrissi: Sure. For example, you can say... Φύγε! Δεν βλέπεις ότι έχω πολλή δουλειά;
Eric: ..which means "Go away! Can't you see I'm very busy?"
Eric: Okay, what's the next word?
Chrissi: ηλιοβασίλεμα
Eric: meaning "sunset, sundown."
Eric: What can you tell us about this?
Chrissi: This is a compound neuter noun that consists of the noun ήλιος meaning "sun" and of the noun βασίλεμα meaning "set."
Eric: So it literally means “sunset.”
Chrissi: Yes. In Greek, we use ηλιοβασίλεμα to mean both the setting of the sun below the horizon, and also the time the sun sets.
Eric: Which is “sundown” in English. We can also use “sunset” in a metaphorical sense in English, like the “sun setting on a career.”
Chrissi: We do the same with ηλιοβασίλεμα in Greek.
Eric: What’s an example using this word?
Chrissi: For example, you can say.. Η ώρα του ηλιοβασιλέματος σήμερα θα είναι στις 6.
Eric: .. which means "The sunset today will be at six."
Eric: Okay, what's the next word?
Chrissi: γύρευε (...)
Eric: meaning "who knows (...)” or “I wonder (...)"
Eric: What can you tell us about this?
Chrissi: The verb γυρεύω means "to seek," "to search for," or "to look for." We can use it in a rhetorical question.
Eric: Such as “who knows…?”
Chrissi: Yes. In this case, we use the imperative form γύρευε followed by an indirect question.
Eric: When can we use this?
Chrissi: You can use it any time.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Chrissi: Sure. For example, you can say.. Γύρευε τι σκεφτόταν τη στιγμή που το έκανε αυτό.
Eric: .. which means "Who knows what he was thinking the moment he did that." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson you will learn about conditionals. A conditional sentence is an “if” sentence. For example, “If I go on a diet, I’ll lose weight,” or “I’ll lose weight if I go on a diet.”
Chrissi: The good news is that the structure in Greek is basically the same. Αν κάνω δίαιτα, θα χάσω βάρος or Θα χάσω βάρος, αν κάνω δίαιτα
Eric: So Greek also uses conditional and main clauses when making these sentences.
Chrissi: Yes. It also uses conjunctions to get the point across, the same way English does.
Eric: In English, we use things like “if” or “whether” in conditional sentences.
Chrissi: But in Greek, we use conjugations such as αν, εάν, άμα and σαν meaning "if" as well as εφόσον.
Eric: How could we say “If I hadn’t heard it for myself, I wouldn’t believe it”?
Chrissi: Αν δεν το άκουγα ο ίδιος, δεν θα το πίστευα.
Eric: The conjunction is at the start, and the two clauses are separated by a comma in writing.
Chrissi: Yes. In Greek, we also have pairs of conditional clauses connected with είτε… είτε , κι αν… κι αν and και να... και να
Eric: What do they mean?
Chrissi: You can use those in “either, or” sentences.
Eric: Hm, how about “Whether I succeed or not, at least I’ll have tried.”
Chrissi: Nice sentiment! Κι αν πετύχω κι αν δεν πετύχω, θα έχω τουλάχιστον προσπαθήσει.
Eric:Is there anything else that we should know about conditionals in Greek?
Chrissi: They can be categorised into types, such as via semantics, whether it is a real condition or something expected, politeness, and so on...
Eric: Wow, that sounds complicated.
Chrissi: The easiest way is divide them into real, Το πραγματικό, and unreal Το μη πραγματικό
Eric: So what does that mean? What’s a real conditional?
Chrissi: If the condition states it is true or can be true, then the main clause is true too. In this case, we can use any tense other than the past progressive or pluperfect tense for the conditional clause.
Eric: And any mood for the main clause. An example would be “If you are in a hurry, you run.”
Chrissi: Αν βιάζεσαι, τρέχεις. The unreal conditional is opposite - things aren’t true and won’t be true. We use the past progressive or pluperfect tense for the conditional clause, and θα OR θα μπορούσα να + the verb in past progressive (παρατατικός) or pluperfect tense in the main clause.
Eric: For example, “If the baby was drowsy, he would be sleeping.” This isn’t real, because the baby isn’t drowsy.
Chrissi: Right. Αν το μωρό νύσταζε, θα κοιμόταν.
Eric: Remember, if you read the lesson notes, you will find more examples!

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Chrissi: Γεια χαρά!

3 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 02:35 AM
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Hi Elias,


Ξέρω and γνωρίζω can be used interchangeably in some cases because they are synonyms, however you should treat ξέρω more as a generic “to know” and “γνωρίζω” as a little bit more fancier. If you break that word down, the first part comes from the word “γνώση” which means “knowledge”. So when you say it, it sounds like “Ι have the knowledge…/I am aware of…”, thus making it sound more polite or sophisticated.


For example γνωρίζω can be used even further when you talk about acquaintances, recognising someone or when you get to know something or someone:


• Γνωριζόμαστε από πέρυσι. = We’ve known each other since last year. (also in the sense of “to meet”)


• Δεν σε γνώρισα με αυτά τα γυαλιά. = I didn’t recognise you with those glasses.


• Τα παιδιά μαθαίνουν να γνωρίζουν το σώμα τους από μικρά. = Kids learn to get to know their bodies from when they are little.


Let me describe two situations:


1) You are shopping in a store and an old lady thinks you work there, shows you an item and asks you about the price. Of course you don’t know, so what you could say to her is:

Αχ συγνώμη, δεν γνωρίζω. Δεν δουλεύω εδώ.

"I am sorry, I do not know. I don’t work here."


2) A friend of yours asks you what time it is. But you don’t have a watch with you. In that case you can use “δεν ξέρω”.


More examples:

• ξέρω ελληνικά rather than γνωρίζω ελληνικά

• γνωρίζω κάποιον σε ένα πάρτι = to meet someone at a party

• σε ξέρω καλά = I know you well


The difference sometimes is hard to tell for a student of Greek, so for more examples, check out the verbs on this dictionary here:

http://www.wordreference.com/engr/


Let me know if you need more help!


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Elias
Tuesday at 03:07 AM
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Γεια σου,

Ποια είναι η διαφορά μεταξύ "ξέρω" και "γνωρίζω";

Ευχαριστώ.