Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to GreekPod101.com. This is Upper Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 2 - Being the Bearer of Good News in Greece. Eric here.
Chrissi: Γεια σας. I'm Chrissi.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the declension of the passive voice participles. The conversation takes place at the house where Katerina lives.
Chrissi: It's between Katerina and her grandmother, Mrs. Meropi.
Eric: The speakers are related, so they’ll be using informal Greek. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

(ήχος εισερχόμενου email)
Κατερίνα: Τι έχουμε εδώ; Εισερχόμενα...
: Ωπ! «Βρισκόμαστε στην ευχάριστη θέση να σας ανακοινώσουμε ότι η αίτησή σας για τη θέση της πλοιοσυνοδού κατέστη επιτυχής.
: Στο συνημμένο αρχείο θα βρείτε όλες τις λεπτομέρειες που αφορούν τη διαδικασία πρόσληψης...». Γιαγιά! Γιαγιά!
Γιαγιά Μερόπη: Τι 'ναι κοκόνα μου;
Κατερίνα: Δεν θα το πιστέψεις! Με πήρανε στην εταιρεία που πήγα για συνέντευξη την προηγούμενη εβδομάδα!
Γιαγιά Μερόπη: Ποια λες; Αυτή με τα κρουαζιερόπλοια;
Κατερίνα: Ναι! Αυτή με τις κρουαζιέρες στο Αιγαίο!
Γιαγιά Μερόπη: Μπράβο κοπέλα μου! Μπράβο καμάρι μου εσύ! Αχ δόξα τον Μεγαλοδύναμο κόρη μου, δεν ξέρεις πόσο προσευχήθηκα για σένα!
Κατερίνα: Και να φανταστείς την ημέρα αυτή ήμουν τόσο αγχωμένη. Τώρα είμαι τόσο ευτυχισμένη που θέλω να φωνάξω!
Γιαγιά Μερόπη: Άντε, πάρε τηλέφωνο τη μάνα σου και τον πατέρα σου στο μαγαζί να τους πεις τα ευχάριστα!
Κατερίνα: Άσε καλύτερα, θα τους κάνω την έκπληξη όταν έρθουν το βραδάκι. Θέλω να δω τις αντιδράσεις τους!
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
(sound of incoming email)
Katerina: What do we have here? Inbox...
: Oh! "We are pleased to inform you that your application as hostess has been successful.
: In the attached file you will find all the details concerning the recruitment process..." Grandma! Grandma!
Grandma Meropi: What is it my dear?
Katerina: You won't believe it! I got accepted at the company I went to last week for an interview!
Grandma Meropi: Which one are you talking about? The one with the cruise ships?
Katerina: Yes! The one with the cruises in the Aegean Sea!
Grandma Meropi: Well done my girl! Well done my gem! Praise to God Almighty my child, you don't know how much I prayed for you!
Katerina: Actually, I was so stressed that day. Now I'm so happy I want to scream!
Grandma Meropi: Go ahead, call your mother and father at the store to tell them the good news!
Katerina: Better yet, I'll surprise them when they come in the evening. I want to see their reactions!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: The official religion of Greece is the Greek Orthodox Church.
Chrissi: Right. 95-98% of the population are members of the Greek Orthodox church.
Eric: But does religion play a big role in everyday life?
Chrissi: I would say that religion is very prevalent in everyday life in Greece. For example, in schools prayers are held each morning and a sanctification is held once a year on the first day of school. Vacations follow the Orthodox calendar and in courts of law people are required to swear to the Evangelion, the Gospel Book.
Eric: So I’m guessing that there are a lot of expressions that hold religious significance then.
Chrissi: That's true. For example, we Greeks often say "Δόξα τω Θεώ!", meaning “Thank God!” or "Έχει ο Θεός ", roughly meaning “God is giving”. It expresses hope that God will bring us something we wish for.
Eric: Like getting the job of our dreams?
Chrissi: (laughs) Yes, it could be that.
Eric: Good to know! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Chrissi: εισερχόμενα [natural native speed]
Eric: inbox (email), incoming (documents)
Chrissi: εισερχόμενα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: εισερχόμενα [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: ευχάριστος [natural native speed]
Eric: pleasant, pleasing
Chrissi: ευχάριστος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: ευχάριστος [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: αίτηση [natural native speed]
Eric: application, request, petition, form
Chrissi: αίτηση [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: αίτηση [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: καθίσταμαι [natural native speed]
Eric: to have a particular property or enter a certain state
Chrissi: καθίσταμαι [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: καθίσταμαι [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: συνημμένος [natural native speed]
Eric: attached
Chrissi: συνημμένος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: συνημμένος [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: κοκόνα [natural native speed]
Eric: sweety, dear, honey, lady (a colloquial way of addressing a majestic lady, a daughter or a granddaughter)
Chrissi: κοκόνα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: κοκόνα [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: καμάρι [natural native speed]
Eric: pride, boast, gloat
Chrissi: καμάρι [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: καμάρι [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: Μεγαλοδύναμος [natural native speed]
Eric: Almighty (God)
Chrissi: Μεγαλοδύναμος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: Μεγαλοδύναμος [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: προσεύχομαι [natural native speed]
Eric: to pray
Chrissi: προσεύχομαι [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: προσεύχομαι [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Chrissi: ...βρίσκομαι στην ευχάριστη θέση να
Eric: Which means “I am pleased to...”
Chrissi: This expression consists of the verb βρίσκομαι, meaning “I am”, the phrase στην ευχάριστη θέση, meaning “in a pleasant position” and the particle να, meaning “to”.
Eric: So, this phrase literally means “I am in a pleasant position to...”, but you can translate it as “I am pleased to...” You can use it in formal situations, when someone is about to announce something pleasant to someone else.
Chrissi: Right. Greeks don't usually use this expression in informal situations. In those cases, people would typically say something a little more simple, like έχω καλά νέα, “I have good news”.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Chrissi: For example, you can say Κυρίες και κύριοι, βρίσκομαι στην ευχάριστη θέση να σας ανακοινώσω τον νικητή του αποψινού διαγωνισμού.
Eric: Meaning “Ladies and gentlemen, I am pleased to announce the winner of tonight's competition.” Okay, what's next?
Chrissi: Τα ευχάριστα.
Eric: Which means “good news”. It is a colloquial phrase, which you can use in both formal and informal situations. However, this is not something that you would hear on TV news or see in the press.
Chrissi: You can also use τα ευχάριστα as an adjective. For example, you could say: τα ευχάριστα νέα, “the good news”.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Chrissi: Sure. How about one with some sarcasm in it? Πήρε η κόρη σου να μας πει τα «ευχάριστα» ότι την έδιωξαν από τη σχολή.
Eric: Meaning “Your daughter called to tell us the ‘good’ news that she got kicked out of school.” Okay, what's the next phrase?
Chrissi: Άσε καλύτερα.
Eric: Meaning “better yet" or "better not.”
Chrissi: Άσε is the imperative of the verb αφήνω, meaning “to leave”, as in “I left my umbrella at the office”. Καλύτερα is an adverb that means “better”. So all together, άσε καλύτερα literally means “better leave it”.
Eric: But you can translate it as “better yet” or “better not”. You can use this phrase among friends, family and people you know well.
Chrissi: Right. For people you don't know that well or for formal situations, you can say αφήστε καλύτερα. This expression is more polite because of the plural imperative form αφήστε.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Chrissi: Sure. For example, you can say Να τον πάρω τηλέφωνο τώρα; Μπα, άσε καλύτερα, γιατί μπορεί να κοιμάται.
Eric: “Should I call him now? Nah, better not, because he might be sleeping.” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the declension of the passive voice participles.
Chrissi: If you remember from our previous lesson, we mentioned that all passive participles that end in an accented or unaccented -μενος behave just like -ος, -η, -ο adjectives, and are inflected in all three genders.
Eric: In this lesson we will take a detailed look at the declension of the present and perfect tense passive participles. Chrissi, let's show our listeners the declension of the present tense passive voice participle.
Chrissi: Alright. Let's take the word “incoming”, which in Greek is εισερχόμενος for masculine, εισερχόμενη for feminine and εισερχόμενο for neuter.
Eric: So, in the genitive case, respectively they will be…
Chrissi: ….του εισερχόμενου, της εισερχόμενης, του εισερχόμενου.
Eric: In the accusative case…
Chrissi: τον εισερχόμενο, την εισερχόμενη, το εισερχόμενο.
Eric: And in the vocative case?
Chrissi: Εισερχόμενε, εισερχόμενη, εισερχόμενο.
Eric: Listeners, here is a very important rule.
Chrissi: Just like the proparoxytone -ος, -η, -ο adjectives, these participles maintain the accent mark on the same syllable throughout their declension, in this case the third to last syllable.
Eric: For example?
Chrissi: Let's see a phrase using a participle as an adjective in the nominative case- ο εργαζόμενος άντρας, meaning “the working man”. The participle εργαζόμενος defines the noun άντρας, “man”. In the genitive case it is του εργαζόμενου άντρα, so the accent mark remains in the same syllable.
Eric: However, when we nominalize such participles, that is, when we use them as nouns, especially in formal speech or scholarly expressions, the accent mark usually, but not always, moves to the next syllable on the right. That happens usually in the genitive case of all genders and in the plural accusative of the masculine and feminine gender.
Chrissi: For example, the nominalized participle ο εργαζόμενος, meaning “the worker” by itself, becomes του εργαζομένου in the genitive case. The accent mark moves to the next syllable on the right.
Eric: Can you give us a sentence with an example?
Chrissi: Sure. Ο εισαγγελέας ρώτησε: «Ποια είναι η σχέση σας με την κατηγορουμένη;»
Eric: Which means “The prosecutor asked: “What is your relationship with the accused?”
Chrissi: In this case, we say κατηγορουμένη instead of κατηγορούμενη.
Eric: Listeners, you can find more information about the nominalized participles and the accent marks in the lesson notes. Now let's move on to the perfect tense passive voice participles.
Chrissi: Let's take the word “stressed”, which in Greek is αγχωμένος for masculine, αγχωμένη for feminine and αγχωμένο for neuter.
Eric: In the genitive case and again in the same gender order it will be…
Chrissi: ….του αγχωμένου, της αγχωμένης, του αγχωμένου.
Eric: In the accusative case it is...
Chrissi: τον αγχωμένο, την αγχωμένη, το αγχωμένο.
Eric: And in the vocative case...
Chrissi: ...it will be αγχωμένε, αγχωμένη, αγχωμένο. Listeners, don't forget to check out the lesson notes for more information!

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Chrissi: Γεια χαρά!

10 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 05:34 PM
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Γεια σου Joan,


Ευχαριστώ for your comment. I've just checked it and it works fine on our side, both on Firefox and Chrome. Could you please recheck? If the problem still persists, please send a message to our Customer Support at contactus@GreekPod101.com with a screenshot of the problem attached, as well as the type of browser and device you are using.


Thank you!


Sincerely,

Λέβεντε

Team GreekPod101.com

Joan Doreen Gardiner
Saturday at 08:21 PM
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I don't know what has happened with the "Slideshow" which is a most helpful feature of this course. It now shows only in English print and only gives the vocabulary not the useful sentences as previously. This is even though I have ticked the choice to have words displayed.

Can this be altered back to how it was previously please.


May thanks


Joan

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 11:39 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Elias,


This is the ending of the passive voice aorist tense. It will start to be examined in lesson #5 of this series?

So don't worry! It's right ahead?


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Elias
Monday at 02:14 AM
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Hi Stefania,

I have seen this ending (-ήθηκα, προσευχ-ήθηκα) in several sentences like (δεν ξέρεις πόσο προσευχήθηκα για σένα!)

Is this a special ending that we will see in the next lessons or we have seen it and i forgot it?


Thank you.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Friday at 02:00 PM
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Hi Tim,


Thank you very much for your kind feedback and message.


As Stefania told you previously, the correct question is "Μπορείτε να μου δώσετε λίγες ακόμα (or ακόμη) πληροφορίες;", which means "Could you give me some more information?".

The sentence that you heard is not grammatically correct so maybe the Greek speakers were not native. ;)


If you have any further questions, please contact us.


Nektarios

Team GreekPod101.com

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 08:18 PM
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Hi tim,


Thank you for posting.


Our team will soon give you a reply :wink:


Sincerely,


Cristiane

Team GreekPod101.com

tim
Sunday at 11:40 PM
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Hi Stefania

First of all thanks for showing us the right way of speaking but i heard by myself while ago conversation between two native greeks that one of them asked in this way( μπορειτε να μου δινετε λιγη ακομα πληροφοριες) how come is it possible it made me little confused.

thanks.

tim
Saturday at 01:00 AM
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:thumbsup::thumbsup:

GreekPod101.com Verified
Friday at 10:19 AM
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Hi Tim,


The correct would be:

Μπορείτε να μου δώσετε λίγες ακόμη πληροφορίες;


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

tim
Thursday at 04:43 AM
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Hi stefania

which one is better to be said μπορειτε να μου δινετε λιγη ακομα πληροφοριες or λιγες ακομα πληροφοριες?

thanks.