Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Iro: Γεία σας εγώ είμαι η Ηρώ.
Judith: Judith here. Upper Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 8 - Confusing Greek directions. Hello and welcome to GreekPod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Greek.
Iro: I'm Iro and thanks again for being here with us for this Upper Beginner, Season 1 lesson.
Judith: In this lesson, you will learn how to ask for directions by foot or car.
Iro: This conversation takes place in Heraklion, on Crete.
Judith: The conversation is between Rhea and Alexis and some passerby’s.
Iro: The speakers don’t know each other, therefore they will be speaking formal Greek.
Judith: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Α: Και τώρα πώς θα πάμε το ξενοδοχείο; Άνοιξε το χάρτη.
Ρ: Ίσως ξέρουν αυτοί που έρχονται...
Ρ: Συγγνώμη, μήπως ξέρετε που είναι το ξενοδοχείο "Οδυσσέας";
Κυρία: Α, είναι μακριά, πάρτε ένα ταξί.
Κύριος: Δεν είναι πολύ μακριά, βλέπετε αυτό το φαρμακείο; Στρίψτε αριστερά και μετά συνεχίστε ευθεία για τριακόσια μέτρα περίπου. Στρίψτε δεξιά στο τρίτο στενό. Στη γωνία υπάρχει...
Κυρία: Όχι, τι λες; Κάντε δεξιά στο δεύτερο δρόμο και μετά αμέσως αριστερά. Στη γωνία υπάρχει μία ταβέρνα. Προχωρήστε εκατό-διακόσια μέτρα και θα δείτε το ξενοδοχείο μπροστά σας.
Α: Ευχαριστούμε πολύ... Λοιπόν, τι κάνουμε;
Ρ: Πάμε. Δεν είναι μακριά.
Α: Μα, η βαλίτσα...
Ρ: Έλα, κάνε και λίγη γυμναστική!
Judith: Now one time slowly.
Α: Και τώρα πώς θα πάμε το ξενοδοχείο; Άνοιξε το χάρτη.
Ρ: Ίσως ξέρουν αυτοί που έρχονται...
Ρ: Συγγνώμη, μήπως ξέρετε που είναι το ξενοδοχείο "Οδυσσέας";
Κυρία: Α, είναι μακριά, πάρτε ένα ταξί.
Κύριος: Δεν είναι πολύ μακριά, βλέπετε αυτό το φαρμακείο; Στρίψτε αριστερά και μετά συνεχίστε ευθεία για τριακόσια μέτρα περίπου. Στρίψτε δεξιά στο τρίτο στενό. Στη γωνία υπάρχει...
Κυρία: Όχι, τι λες; Κάντε δεξιά στο δεύτερο δρόμο και μετά αμέσως αριστερά. Στη γωνία υπάρχει μία ταβέρνα. Προχωρήστε εκατό-διακόσια μέτρα και θα δείτε το ξενοδοχείο μπροστά σας.
Α: Ευχαριστούμε πολύ... Λοιπόν, τι κάνουμε;
Ρ: Πάμε. Δεν είναι μακριά.
Α: Μα, η βαλίτσα...
Ρ: Έλα, κάνε και λίγη γυμναστική!
Judith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Α: Και τώρα πώς θα πάμε το ξενοδοχείο; Άνοιξε το χάρτη.
A: And now how do we go to the hotel? Open the map.
Ρ: Ίσως ξέρουν αυτοί που έρχονται…
R: Maybe those people [they] who are coming know...
Ρ: Συγγνώμη, μήπως ξέρετε που είναι το ξενοδοχείο "Οδυσσέας";
R: Excuse me, do you perhaps know where the Hotel Odysseus is?
Κυρία: Α, είναι μακριά, πάρτε ένα ταξί.
Lady: Ah, it's far, take a taxi.
Κύριος: Δεν είναι πολύ μακριά, βλέπετε αυτό το φαρμακείο; Στρίψτε αριστερά και μετά συνεχίστε ευθεία για τριακόσια μέτρα περίπου. Στρίψτε δεξιά στο τρίτο στενό. Στη γωνία υπάρχει…
Gentleman: It's not very far, do you see the pharmacy? Turn left, and then continue straight for about three hundred meters. Turn right at the third alley. On the corner there is...
Κυρία: Όχι, τι λες; Κάντε δεξιά στο δεύτερο δρόμο και μετά αμέσως αριστερά. Στη γωνία υπάρχει μία ταβέρνα. Προχωρήστε εκατό-διακόσια μέτρα και θα δείτε το ξενοδοχείο μπροστά σας.
Lady: No, what are you saying? Make a right at the second street and then immediately left. On the corner there is a café. Go forward one hundred or two hundred meters, and you'll see the hotel in front of you.
Α: Ευχαριστούμε πολύ... Λοιπόν, τι κάνουμε;
A: Thank you very much... Well, what do we do?
Ρ: Πάμε. Δεν είναι μακριά.
R: Let's go. It's not far.
Α: Μα, η βαλίτσα…
A: But, the suitcase...
Ρ: Έλα, κάνε και λίγη γυμναστική!
R: Come, do a little exercise!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Judith: Okay, may be a great lesson to talk about Greek city-scapes. This is something that always fascinates me when I go to another country and suddenly the streets, the entire city looks so completely different.
Iro: After World War Two and the Greek Civil War, many Greeks from the country side immigrated to Western Europe, the United States, Canada and Australia. And those who remained moved to cities in search of jobs.
Judith: This led to the further development of Greek cities, including the construction of many big buildings. This development was very quick. It was not based around any project, there was no architectural design. The buildings were made of concrete and cheap materials, the streets were narrow and there were no parks or green spaces.
Iro: Greece is a crossroad of civilizations, and this is reflected in its architecture. It ranges from the classical ruins of Greek in roman antiquity, byzantine churches, Venetian era buildings and more recent buildings from the 1930s built by Western European architects.
Judith: Nowadays, there are many projects in big cities, especially Athens, to create green spaces and to transform the old factories into museums of modern art. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Judith: The first word we shall see is…
Iro: Ανοίγω
Judith: To open.
Iro: Ανοίγω
Judith: Next.
Iro: Χάρτης
Judith: Map.
Iro: Χάρτης
Judith: This word is masculine. Next.
Iro: Ίσως
Judith: Maybe, perhaps.
Iro: Ίσως
Judith: Next.
Iro: Ταξί
Judith: Taxi.
Iro: Ταξί
Judith: Next.
Iro: Φαρμακείο
Judith: Pharmacy.
Iro: Φαρμακείο
Judith: Next.
Iro: Στρίβω
Judith: To turn.
Iro: Στρίβω
Judith: Next.
Iro: Συνεχίζω
Judith: To continue or keep.
Iro: Συνεχίζω
Judith: Next.
Iro: Στενό
Judith: Alley.
Iro: Στενό
Judith: Next.
Iro: Γωνία
Judith: Corner.
Iro: Γωνία
Judith: This word is feminine. Next.
Iro: Προχωρώ
Judith: To proceed.
Iro: Προχωρώ
Judith: Next.
Iro: Μπροστά
Judith: In front.
Iro: Μπροστά
Judith: Next.
Iro: Βαλίτσα
Judith: Suitcase.
Iro: Βαλίτσα
Judith: This word is feminine. Next.
Iro: Γυμναστική
Judith: Exercise, gymnastics.
Iro: Γυμναστική
Judith: This word is feminine (not neuter). Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Iro: The first word we'll look at is ανοίγω.
Judith: Meaning “to open”. This may be used in many ways that may be counterintuitive to English speakers. For example, you open a map, open a fire, which means light a fire, you open the television or the computer, meaning to switch it on, or you open the lights, that means switch on the lights.
Iro: Άνοιξε το φως.
Judith: This is the phrase “turn on the light”. Literally, “open the light”.
Iro: In terms of new Aorist stems, this lesson features ανοίξω from ανοίγω, στρίψω from στρίβω, συνεχίσω from συνεχίζω, and προχωρήσω from προχωρώ.
Judith: These are all regular according to the rules you have learned in lesson two of the series.

Lesson focus

Judith: The focus of this lesson is the imperative with the Aorist stem. In this lesson’s dialogue, you saw that there is also an Aorist version of the imperative. In fact, this is the more common imperative because most commands are for short, momentary actions.
Iro: If you’re giving directions, for example anything like go, turn, stop and so on, will always be momentary. So all these commands use the Aorist stem of verbs.
Judith: In contrast, an example for a long-term command could be if a doctor tells you to work less, this recommendation carries far into the future, so you will see a normal stem here.
Iro: The Aorist imperative is formed just like the normal imperative, just with the Aorist stem instead of the normal stem.
Judith: This matches what you’ve seen for the other tenses. The endings stay the same, only the stem changes for Aorists.
Iro: So the imperative endings are still -ε for one person and -τε for several, but instead of παίζε, you’ll see παίξε.
Judith: Play.
Iro: Στρίβετε becomes στρίψτε.
Judith: Turn.
Iro: And so on.

Outro

Judith: That just about does it for today.
Iro: Dear listeners, ever pressed for time?
Judith: Listen to the dialogue lesson recap.
Iro: These audio tracks only contain the target lesson dialogue.
Judith: So you can quickly recap a lesson.
Iro: Spend a few minutes learning on days when you don’t have time to study a full lesson.
Judith: The audio tracks are just a few minutes long.
Iro: But you will still pick up key phrases along the way.
Judith: Go to GreekPod101.com.
Iro: And listen to this lesson’s dialogue-only audio track.
Judith: So see you next time.
Iro: Γεια σας, τα λέμε την επόμενη φορά.

12 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 05:56 AM
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Hi Eilas,


I wish you wholeheartedly the best of luck and fulfilling your dream!


Καλή επιτυχία,


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Elias
Thursday at 01:59 AM
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Thank you Stefania for the response,

I think i have to research a little more and also think more before making any decision. But if i could go to Greece for studying, that would be the best time of my life. ????❤️️?

By the way this website has not very good-looking emojis.???

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 04:32 AM
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Hi Elias,


I'm not sure I can give you any good recommendation because the aviation industry that you mentioned is a vast one and includes many professions. Are you interested in aircraft engineering, being ground staff at an airport, a flight attendant, a pilot? Those are very different things and might have to be studied in different institutions or maybe not even studied in a university at all.


In Greece, specific professions might have to be studied in specific universities of specific cities. For example, for "ΤΕΙ τουριστικών επαγγελμάτων" there are only 2 campuses. One in Crete and one in Rhodes. There's none in Athens! So first and foremost you have to decide what is it that you need to study because that will define where you need to go and live.


Also, I'm not sure how the system works for foreign students, and especially now because I'm not that up to date with what's going on in the Greek universities, but for Greeks, only the students with the highest scores end up in the universities of Athens which have a specific number of spots to offer. For example, say 68 spots are offered for the graphic design school. Out of all the people that have selected Athens as their place to study graphic design (and those can be hundreds), only the best 68 will be selected. The rest will lose that spot and will have to go to the next university of their preference. For example the equivalent university in Thessaloniki (if they stated that university in their preferences). As the scores get lower, so do the universities change from bigger cities to smaller cities.


That's why when Greeks finish high school and participate in a standardised Panhellenic examination system (the tests are very hard and require months of preparation in cram schools), they need to fill in a form afterwards called μηχανογραφικό where they select all the universities they wish to go to in an order of preference keeping into account their scores and the minimum score requested by the specific institution they want to go to. The score system is a points system that we call μόρια. So the more μόρια you have, the better. But like I said, in the case of foreign students the system might be different. I just don't know anything about it. Check also about the Erasmus exchange program. It might be helpful.


http://www.erasmusprogramme.com/


Regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Elias
Wednesday at 12:43 AM
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Thank you for the response Stefania,

Sometimes i am thinking to continue my education in Greece. Sense i have no idea about universities or colleges in Greece, would you recommend any public university or college for undergraduate level in general in Athens? In case if you are wondering what major, i am interested in aviation industry like airplanes, airports and so on. But i do not want to limit myself to one field so i am totally open to all other fields.

P.s I can also learn Greek faster. ????


Thank you.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 05:07 PM
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Hi Elias,


As far as I know, universities in Greece do not charge tuition fees to domestic students at undergraduate level. Free education is a right protected by our constitution. Since Greece is a member state of the European Union, this also applies to all students from EU/EEA countries, at all public universities and colleges. Pretty cool, uh?? Some master degree programs may have fees, though, and in some cases EU/EEA students may request their textbooks free of charge. However, I advise you to check with the university of your choice.


Regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Elias
Tuesday at 04:32 AM
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Hi there,

Would you happen to know if students from EU countries who wish to study in a university or college in Greece should pay any tuition fees?

Thank you.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 03:23 PM
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Γεια σου Ιουστίνα!


Παρακαλώ, ευχαρίστησή μου!

Χαίρομαι που τα παραδείγματα βοηθήσανε!


Γεια σου,


Stefania,

Team GreekPod101.com

Ιουστίνα
Tuesday at 10:45 PM
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Ευχαριστώ για την εξήγηση σου, Στεφανία. Τα παραδείγματα είναι πολύ χρήσιμα!

Thank you for your explanation, Stefania. The examples are very helpful!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 02:24 PM
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Hi Gabriel!


Thank you for your comment! I hope this dialogue will come handy when you visit Greece:wink:


About your question, I don't think Greeks in general get confused when giving directions. Especially in Athens, a lot of people drive, take buses or move around by foot, so they are very familiar with the streets. I feel that in cities where the subway is the No1 means of transportation, people are not very familiar with streets. In Greeve they might even know how to direct you if YOU are driving, in order for you not to go the wrong way on a one way road or avenue.


Also in Greek cities and towns all streets have a specific name, with signs on corners written in both Greek and English, so if they someone doesn't remember how many meters or how many blocks away, the will simply say "go straight until you see "THIS NAME" road and then turn..."


Enjoy Greek studying!


Hi Ιουστίνα!


μήπως: a hesitation subjunctive (connects 2 sentences) but also works as a hesitation adverb


1. It can be used in direct questions, usually placed at the beginning and often in combination with "τυχόν" (=possibly), "Μήπως τυχόν...;". In that way the speaker expresses his wondering about something that might be going on:

~ σε μάλωσε κανείς; Did someone PERHAPS tell you off?

~ τυχόν γύρισε; Is he back yet? (PERHAPS he is back already)

~ τηλεφώνησε κανείς όσο έλειπα; Did someone call while I was away? (PERHAPS someone did)

~ είναι ακόμη στο γραφείο; Is she/he perhaps still in the office?

~ ενοχλώ; Am I bothering? (PERHAPS I am bothering)

Πριν από σας ~ τυχόν πέρασε κανείς άλλος; Before you, did anyone else pass by, PERHAPS?

Yπάρχουν ~ επίσημα στοιχεία; Are there PERHAPS any official evidence?

Πώς τιμωρήθηκε, με επίπληξη ~ ή (~) με αποβολή; How was he punished, with a wigging or PERHAPS with expulsion?

~ κοιμήθηκες και δεν τους άκουσες που ήρθαν; Did you PERHAPS sleep and didn't hear them come?

>>As you can see sometimes it is not even necessary to mention "PERHAPS" in the English direct translation. It is somehow implied.


2. It can be used also in indirect questions, either alone, or often used with "και":

Ρώτησέ τους ~ (και) θέλουν τίποτε. Ask them IF they want something. (MAYBE they want something)

Aναρωτιέμαι ~ (και) ήμουν εγώ τελικά η αιτία για όλα αυτά. I am wondering IF I was the reason for all of this. (MAYBE I was)

Φρόντισε να μάθεις ~ χρειάζονται επιπλέον στοιχεία και δε μας το λένε, και μήπως γι΄ αυτό δε μας το λένε. Make sure you find out WHETHER more evidence is needed and they are not saying anything, and PERHAPS that is why they are not saying anything to us.

>>As you can see it doesn't always translates as "PERHAPS" in this case


3. It can be used in rhetorical questions too (although these questions don't translate as question in English):

~ κι εγώ το ήθελα; (κι εγώ καθόλου δεν το ήθελα.) = As if I wanted it. (meaning "I didn't want it at all")

~ διάβασε, για να πετύχει; (δε διάβασε καθόλου.) = As if he studied to succeed. (meaning "He didn't study at all)

~ δεν του το είπαμε; (του το είπαμε πολλές φορές.) = As if we didn't tell him. (We told him many times)

~ δεν το ξέρω; (το ξέρω και πολύ καλά μάλιστα.) = As if I don't know that! (I know this very well)


4. As a conjunction, it leads a sentence that expresses hesitation, especially after using a verb that expresses fear, worries etc.:

Φοβόταν ~ τον πιάσουν. = He was afraid of being caught (PERHAPS he could get caught)

Aνησυχούσε ~ φύγει και δεν τον ξαναδούν = He was worrying that he would go and they wouldn't see him again. (PERHAPS they wouldn't see him again)

Δεν το πήρε μαζί του από φόβο ~ και το χάσει. = He didn't take it with him, for fear that he could lose it. (PERHAPS he could lose it)

>>Again this word does cannot be directly translated here


5. At the end of a sentence:

Λες να μην πήγε ακόμη στην τράπεζα; Λέω, ~. = Do you think he didn't go to the bank yet? I am just saying.

>> Here it translated as "I am just saying", as in I am just making an assumption.... PERHAPS he didn't go to the bank yet.


6. As a noun (uncommon though):

Xιλιάδες ~ ταράζουν την ηρεμία του. A thousand of "WHAT IFS" disturb his tranquility

____________________________________________________________________________

ίσως:hesitation adverb.


1. It expresses something possible, something that might or could happen:

Aς προσπαθήσουμε ακόμα λίγο· ~ βρούμε μια καλύτερη λύση. Let's try some more; perhaps we can find a better solution (MAYBE)

Σε ρωτώ, γιατί ~ (να) έχεις ακούσει κάτι. I am asking you, because maybe you've heard something.

~ ναι, ~ όχι. Maybe yes, maybe no.


2. Used with όταν ~ / αν ~, when the speaker wants to make clear that he thinks something is likely impossible or even completely impossible:

Όταν ~ γίνουν όλα αυτά, τότε τα ξαναλέμε. Whenever these things MIGHT happen, then we can talk again.

__________________________________________________________________________


It is hard to explain the difference between these two, so I thought that maybe showing you many examples, you can easily realize their correct usage. Let me know if you need more clarification about something specific στα παραπάνω (on the above:wink: - this is what I meant on a previous message about the above/below reference)


Γεια!


Stefania,

Team GreekPod101.com

Ιουστίνα
Monday at 05:28 AM
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Σε παρακαλώ, θα μπορούσες να εξηγείς την διαφορά μεταξύ "μήπως" και "ίσως"΄;


Please, would you explain the difference between "μήπως" and "ίσως"?


Ευχαριστώ.