Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Iro: Γεια σας, εγώ είμαι η Ηρώ.
Judith: Judith here. Upper Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 22 - Getting Tired of the Greek Tour.
Iro: Hello, everyone. I’m Iro and welcome to GreekPod101.com.
Judith: With us, you’ll learn to speak Greek with fun and effective lessons.
Iro: We also provide you with cultural insights
Judith: And tips you won’t find in a textbook. In this lesson, you will learn how to understand more of a visit to the museum.
Iro: This conversation takes place at a museum in Crete.
Judith: The conversation is between the tour guide, Rhea and Alexis.
Iro: Rhea and Alexis are siblings therefore they will be speaking informal Greek.
Judith: Let’s listen to the conversation. Iro, I heard that Icarus was a famous person from Crete.
DIALOGUE
Ξεναγός: Και τώρα περνάμε στην επόμενη αίθουσα όπου βρίσκονται διάφορα αντικείμενα. Εδώ βλέπετε εργαλεία, τα οποία δείχνουν ότι οι κάτοικοι ασχολούνται με τη γεωργία. Οι αγρότες έχουν επίσης ζώα, όπως καταλαβαίνουμε από τα εκθέματα.
Ρ: Περπατάμε πολλές ώρες. Είμαι κουρασμένη.
Α: Κι εγώ. Είναι αδύνατο να δει κανείς το μουσείο μέσα σε μια μέρα.
Ρ: Πάμε στο μαγαζί με τα σουβενίρ πρώτα; Θέλω να αγοράσω κάρτες για να στείλω στην Ελπίδα και στη μαμά.
Α: Δεν είσαι κουρασμένη;
Ρ: Είμαι λίγο αλλά δεν πειράζει. Θα κάνω γρήγορα.
Α: Εντάξει, αλλά μετά να πάμε για φαγητό γιατί πεινάω!
Ρ: Φυσικά πεινάς, αφού δεν τρως ποτέ πρωινό!
Α: Έλα, μην αρχίζεις πάλι!
Judith: Now one time slowly.
Ξεναγός: Και τώρα περνάμε στην επόμενη αίθουσα όπου βρίσκονται διάφορα αντικείμενα. Εδώ βλέπετε εργαλεία, τα οποία δείχνουν ότι οι κάτοικοι ασχολούνται με τη γεωργία. Οι αγρότες έχουν επίσης ζώα, όπως καταλαβαίνουμε από τα εκθέματα.
Ρ: Περπατάμε πολλές ώρες. Είμαι κουρασμένη.
Α: Κι εγώ. Είναι αδύνατο να δει κανείς το μουσείο μέσα σε μια μέρα.
Ρ: Πάμε στο μαγαζί με τα σουβενίρ πρώτα; Θέλω να αγοράσω κάρτες για να στείλω στην Ελπίδα και στη μαμά.
Α: Δεν είσαι κουρασμένη;
Ρ: Είμαι λίγο αλλά δεν πειράζει. Θα κάνω γρήγορα.
Α: Εντάξει, αλλά μετά να πάμε για φαγητό γιατί πεινάω!
Ρ: Φυσικά πεινάς, αφού δεν τρως ποτέ πρωινό!
Α: Έλα, μην αρχίζεις πάλι!
Judith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Ξεναγός: Και τώρα περνάμε στην επόμενη αίθουσα όπου βρίσκονται διάφορα αντικείμενα. Εδώ βλέπετε εργαλεία, τα οποία δείχνουν ότι οι κάτοικοι ασχολούνται με τη γεωργία. Οι αγρότες έχουν επίσης ζώα, όπως καταλαβαίνουμε από τα εκθέματα.
Guide: And now we're going into the next room where various objects can be found. Here you see tools, which show that the inhabitants are concerned with agriculture. The farmers also have animals, as we understand from the exhibits.
Ρ: Περπατάμε πολλές ώρες. Είμαι κουρασμένη.
R: We've been walking [we walk] for many hours. I'm tired.
Α: Κι εγώ. Είναι αδύνατο να δει κανείς το μουσείο μέσα σε μια μέρα.
A: Me too. It's impossible for anyone to see the museum in one day.
Ρ: Πάμε στο μαγαζί με τα σουβενίρ πρώτα; Θέλω να αγοράσω κάρτες για να στείλω στην Ελπίδα και στη μαμά.
R: Shall we go to the souvenir shop [shop with the souvenirs] first? I want to buy postcards to send to Elpida and to Mom.
Α: Δεν είσαι κουρασμένη;
A: Aren't you tired?
Ρ: Είμαι λίγο αλλά δεν πειράζει. Θα κάνω γρήγορα.
R: I'm a little, but it doesn't matter. I'll do [it] quickly.
Α: Εντάξει, αλλά μετά να πάμε για φαγητό γιατί πεινάω!
A: Okay, but then we'll go for food because I'm hungry!
Ρ: Φυσικά πεινάς, αφού δεν τρως ποτέ πρωινό!
R: Naturally you're hungry, since you never eat breakfast!
Α: Έλα, μην αρχίζεις πάλι!
A: Come on, don't start again!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Judith: Iro, I heard that Icarus was a famous person from Crete.
Iro: Yes, his father, Daedalus, was a famous Athenian artisan. King Minos of Crete called Daedalus in order to build a great labyrinth in which they imprisoned the Minotaur.
Judith: The Minotaur was a monster with a bull’s head and a man’s body. Supposedly, this monster was born from the union of Minos’ wife and a bull.
Iro: Minos was ashamed of the birth of this monster so he kept it hidden in the labyrinth. To feed it, he forced Aegaeus, the king of Athens, to send young man as tribute each year, and the monster would eat them.
Judith: Theseus, the son of Aegaeus, decided to go to Crete in order to put an end to this. He wanted to slay the Minotaur once and for all.
Iro: Then, Ariadne, Minos’ daughter, immediately fell in love with the handsome hero and with Daedalus' help and a ball of string helped him kill the Minotaur and escape the labyrinth.
Judith: Minos was very angry when he heard of this and imprisoned Daedalus and his son, Icarus, in the labyrinth.
Iro: That’s when Daedalus fashioned two pairs of wings out of wax and feathers in order to fly away from Crete. Once in the sky, he warned Icarus not to fly too low because the wings would get wet and not too high because the sun would melt the wax.
Judith: However, because Icarus was too excited, he flew too close to the sun. His wings melted and he plummeted to his death in the sea.
Iro: Everyone knows this story in Greece and it has inspired many artists.
Judith: Now, let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Judith: The first word we shall see is?
Iro: Όπου
Judith: Where.
Iro: ‘Οπου
Judith: Next...
Iro: Βρίσκομαι
Judith: To be found.
Iro: Βρίσκομαι
Judith: Next...
Iro: Διάφορος
Judith: Various.
Iro: Διάφορος
Judith: Next...
Iro: Εργαλείο
Judith: Tool.
Iro: Εργαλείο
Judith: Next...
Iro: Κάτοικος
Judith: Inhabitant.
Iro: Κάτοικος
Judith: Next...
Iro: Γεωργία
Judith: Agriculture.
Iro: Γεωργία
Judith: Next...
Iro: Γεωργία
Judith: Next...
Iro: Αγρότης
Judith: Farmer.
Iro: Αγρότης
Judith: Next...
Iro: Ζώο
Judith: Animal.
Iro: Ζώο
Judith: Next...
Iro: Όπως
Judith: As.
Iro: Όπως
Judith: Next...
Iro: Αδύνατον
Judith: Impossible.
Iro: Αδύνατον
Judith: Next...
Iro: Κανείς
Judith: Nobody.
Iro: Κανείς
Judith: Next...
Iro: Σουβενίρ
Judith: Souvenir.
Iro: Σουβενίρ
Judith: Next...
Iro: Αφού
Judith: Since.
Iro: Αφού
Judith: Let’s take a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases of this lesson.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Iro: The first word we’ll look at is: βρίσκομαι.
Judith: This is the reflexive form of βρίσκω. So far, we’ve seen reflexive verbs and we’ve seen normal verbs but they were not related.
Iro: Now, βρίσκω and βρίσκομαι is an example of pair-related verbs. Just replace the ω with ομαι. Just replace the ω with ομαι. Βρίσκω means “to find”, and βρίσκομαι could be translated as “to be found” or “to find oneself”.
Judith: Be careful when it comes to the word κανείς – “nobody”. It looks and sounds almost the same as κάνεις – “you do”. Only the stress is different. Only the stress is different.
Iro: If the stress is on the first syllable, κάνεις means “you do”. And if the stress is on the last syllable, κανείς means “nobody”.

Lesson focus

Judith: The focus of this lesson are sub clauses. In this lesson, we have seen several types of sub clauses in Greek. Sub clauses can help you express yourself better. So let’s look at some words to form sub clauses. Then, see if you can indicate the words into your next Greek conversation.
Iro: Όπου
Judith: “Where”. Can you give us an example?
Iro: Περνάμε στην επόμενη αίθουσα, όπου βρίσκονται διάφορα αντικείμενα.
Judith: We are going into the next room, where various objects can be found.
Iro: Ότι
Judith: That.
Iro: Αυτό δείχνει ότι είναι σωστό.
Judith: “This shows that it’s right.” ότι is also used after verbs like “to think”, “to say”, “to believe” and so on.
Iro: Να ή για να.
Judith: So that.
Iro: Πάω στο κέντρο για να αγοράσω ένα βιβλίο.
Judith: “I’m going to the city center in order to buy a book.” The για is optional. You could say για να or να.
Iro: Γιατί.
Judith: Because.
Iro: Πάμε στο μαγαζί, γιατί έχω ανάγκη από ένα βιβλίο.
Judith: “Let’s go to the shop because I need a book.”
Iro: Αλλά.
Judith: But.
Iro: Πάμε στο μαγαζί, αλλά να κάνουμε γρήγορα.
Judith: Let’s go to the shop, but let’s be quick.
Iro: Αφού.
Judith: Since.
Iro: Φυσικά πεινάς, αφού δεν τρως ποτέ πρωινό.
Judith: Of course you are hungry since you never eat your breakfast.

Outro

Iro: That just does it for today.
Judith: Attention, perfectionists. You’re about to learn how to perfect you pronunciation.
Iro: Listen Review Audio Tracks.
Judith: Increase fluency and vocabulary fast with these short, effective audio tracks.
Iro: Super simple to use. Listen to the Greek word or phrase.
Judith: Then repeat it out loud, clear voice.
Iro: You’ll speak with confidence knowing that you’re speaking Greek like the locals.
Judith: Go to GreekPod101.com and download the Review Audio Tracks right on the lessons’ page, today. We hope you enjoyed this lesson. See you next week.
Iro: Γεια σας, τα λέμε την επόμενη φορά.

21 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 10:23 PM
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Hi Alain,


It's true! I'm really sorry Greek is such a complex language to learn 😅


But should you have any questions, feel free to ask. I'll be glad to help.


Cheers,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Alain Côté
Friday at 08:45 AM
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Εντάξει Στεφανία, ευχαριστώ. That's one complicated set of declensions and separate forms to learn for one word!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Friday at 01:23 AM
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Hi Alain,


Thank you for your compliment! I always try my best to provide detailed and clear explanations. I'm really happy to know those are really helpful :)


Very good follow up question.


The pronouns κανείς/κανένας, καμία/καμιά, κανένα seem quite tricky because of all the different ways we translate them but there's a simple way to know what they mean. We just need to look at the verb they are used with.


These have two meanings, and their translations depend on the context.


"no one, nobody (not even one)" >> when there is a negation in the verb

Κανένας δεν με καταλαβαίνει.

"Nobody understands me."

Δεν το πήρε κανείς.

"No one took it."

"some, someone, somebody, anyone, anybody" >> when there's no negation in the verb

Είναι κανείς εκεί;

"Is anybody there?"

Πέρασε από το σπίτι καμιά μέρα.

"Pass by the house some day."

Αν δεις κανένα παιδί, ρώτησέ το.

"If you see a kid, ask him."


The first scenario creates a double negative. You can learn more about double negatives in this lesson right here where these pronouns are also mentioned around the end of the lesson. I figured it might help:

https://www.greekpod101.com/lesson/absolute-beginner-questions-answered-by-stefania-22-do-two-negatives-make-a-positive/?lp=96


Let me know if you have any more questions.


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Alain Côté
Thursday at 08:10 AM
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Στεφανία,


Wow, what a clear and complete answer, you are the best! Of course I now have a follow-up question, but it doesn't relate to the same subject. In one of your examples, Το να αγοράζει κανείς σουβενίρ είναι μπελάς, κανείς gets translated as "someone", whereas we were just shown recently that it can mean "nobody": Φώναξα βοήθεια, αλλά κανείς δεν έτρεξε. In this example, does "κανείς" get litterally translated as "someone", as well (I screamed help, but someone did not come)? Also in this example: Είναι αδύνατο να δει κανείς το μουσείο μέσα σε μια μέρα, it gets translated as "anyone". Compare to Κανένας δεν ξέρει τη σημασία των σχημάτων, where κανένας is "nobody". Can you help me understand the use differences between the two words?


Ευχαριστώ

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 01:43 AM
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Γεια σου Alain,


This structure in the second person is impersonal. We use it often when we talk about a specific action in general without wanting to define a specific person, animal, or thing as a subject. The 3rd person can also be used in impersonal speech.


I'm glad you mentioned English gerunds and French infinitives (the grammar buff in me wakes up)! I'll analyze everything below:


A gerund in English functions like a verb and a noun:


As a noun:

- Buying souvenirs is such a hassle.

(The) buying / (The action of) buying souvenirs is such a hassle. (The gerund is the answer to "What (is a hassle)?" and is a subject here)


- I like dancing.

I like (the) dancing. (The gerund is the answer to "What (do I like)?" and it can be replaced by a noun such as "apples")


Among its various uses, a gerund can express manner sometimes as an adverbial determiner. For example:

Do the test without talking. (manner, answering the question How (to do the test)?).


Now, in Greek, we don't have gerunds, although some teachers of Greek mistakenly use the term "gerund" when referring to the Greek active voice particles ending in -οντας and -ώντας. The truth is, these active voice participles do NOT function as a noun at all, they only express manner, so they only have an adverbial function, not a noun function like gerunds do as well.


Περπατάει χαμογελώντας. = He walks smiling. (How is he walking? > Smiling)


Now let's do some reverse engineering here 😄 with our sentence "Buying souvenirs is such a hassle."


How do we render "buying" in Greek since it's a gerund functioning like a noun in the position of a subject but at the same time expresses an action like a verb?


(light bulb emoji) We nominalize a verb and use that as a fake "noun" in the position of a subject!👍


And how do we do that😳?


We add the neuter article το in front of a verb in the subjunctive (either momentary or continuous depending on the context) and the whole phrase starts functioning as a noun, so you can use it as a subject, object, or predicate 😎.


Ok, great, but what person should the verb in the subjunctive be😒?


Like I mentioned at the beginning, when talking impersonally, about something in general, you can use either the second or third person. Most of the impersonal speech in Greek uses the third person, for example, βρέχει, χιονίζει, φυσάει, φαίνεται, etc. (it's raining, it's snowing, it's windy, it seems, etc.)


In this particular sentence using the second person instead of the third one makes the sentence sound more like advice to our listener.


Το να αγοράζεις σουβενίρ είναι μπελάς.

This feels like "Be careful. If YOU buy souvenirs, it will probably be a hassle).


If we render this for the third person, we will need the help of the indefinite pronoun κανείς (meaning "someone" in the following structure):


Το να αγοράζει κανείς σουβενίρ είναι μπελάς.

("It's a hassle for someone to buy souvenirs)

This doesn't feel like a piece of advice. We are just talking in general.


Now, regarding the French infinitives, when they are used as an English gerund in the position of a noun, just follow the same nominalization procedure I described above to render them in Greek keeping in mind whether you need to use the second or third person singular. So although there's no direct equivalent of French infinitives in Greek, you can always find a way to express them appropriately.


Now check out these examples (sorry if I make a mistake, I studied French back in middle school and high school):


[Manger] du chocolat est délicieux!

[Το να τρως σοκολάτα] είναι πολύ νόστιμο! (nominalized subjunctive)


J' aime [manger] du chocolat.

Μου αρέσει [να τρώω] σοκολάτα. (subjunctive only)


As you can see, you'll need the subjunctive to express a French infinitive, either nominalized or by itself, usually after a verb in the indicative.


And finally, what is considered as an infinitive in Greek, is equivalent to the past participle in English:


I have [eaten].

Έχω [φάει].


The Greek infinitive is merely a formation element of the perfective tenses of a verb: present perfect, past perfect, future perfect. It can never be used by itself (φάει) and it doesn't express person as it remains the same during the conjugation.

έχω φάει

έχεις φάει

έχει φάει

etc.


If you want to know more about impersonal verbs, check out this lesson here:

https://www.greekpod101.com/lesson/upper-intermediate-12-planning-a-night-of-dancing-in-greece/?lp=40


I hope everything is more clear now.


All the best,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Alain Côté
Wednesday at 04:16 AM
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Γεια Στεφανία.


"Το να αγοράζεις σουβενίρ είναι μπελάς." I am wondering why, in this sentence, the verb is conjugated in the second person of the present tense, rather than some form similar to the English gerund ("buying"). In French, we would use the infintive here ("Acheter des souvenirs est emmerdant."), but I guess there is no equivalent to the infinitive in Greek. Can you explain the choice in grammatical terms?


Ευχαριρτώ


Alain

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:14 AM
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Γεια σου Johannes,


σε ευχαριστώ για το σχόλιό σου και για την εκτίμηση που μου δείχνεις.

Χαρά μου είναι να απαντώ και να λύνω απορίες! Γι' αυτό είμαι εδώ! 😄


Να 'σαι καλά,

Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Johannes
Wednesday at 06:38 AM
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Γεια Στεφανία,


είναι υπέροχο πού απαντάς κι εξηγείς πάντα τόσο λεπτομεριακά. Ευχαριστώ πολύ.


Γεια χαρά

Johannes

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 05:26 AM
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Γεια σου Johannes,


ναι, μου φαίνονται σωστά όλα όσα είπες.


«Τι βιβλίο διαβάζεις;» είναι πιο πολύ σαν «Τι είδος βιβλίου διαβάζεις». Η απάντηση μπορεί να είναι «Διαβάζω ένα βιβλίο για νεράιδες.» Μπορώ επίσης αν θέλω να απαντήσω και με τον τίτλο του βιβλίου. Δεν θα ήταν λάθος, όμως αυτή η ερώτηση δείχνει ότι ο ομιλητής δεν ενδιαφέρεται τόσο πολύ για τον τίτλο όσο για το ποιόν* (essence or qualities) του βιβλίου, οπότε πρέπει να περιγράψω λίγο το βιβλίο που διαβάζω.


*ποιόν: https://bit.ly/2JW7vqH


Αντιθέτως, με την ερώτηση «Ποιο βιβλίο διαβάζεις;» ο ομιλητής ενδιαφέρεται καθαρά για τον τίτλο του βιβλίου.

Αν απαντήσω «Ένα βιβλίο για νεράιδες.» θα ήταν λάθος! Θα μου πει μετά «Πώς το λένε εννοώ!» ίσως λίγο εκνευρισμένα!


Και ναι, αν είσαι σε ένα κατάστημα και πρέπει να αποφασίσεις μεταξύ μίας κόκκινης και μίας μαύρης γραβάτας, τότε λες «ποια». Όταν θα μπεις στο κατάστημα για γραβάτες, η πωλήτρια ίσως σε ρωτήσει «Τι γραβάτα ψάχνετε;» που σημαίνει «τι είδους γραβάτα». Δηλαδή «μία γραβάτα με ρίγες» ή «μία γραβάτα με βούλες», ή «μία γραβάτα που να ταιριάζει με ένα μπλε κουστούμι» κ.τ.λ.


Μην ανησυχείς, το 'χεις! (slang-ish expression for "you got this")


Γεια χαρά!


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Johannes
Friday at 07:27 AM
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Γεια Στεφανία,


Σε ευχαριστώ πολύ. Νομίζω πως κατάλαβα τη διαφορά. Προσπαθώ να κάνω δύο παραδείγματα:


Αν ρωτά κανείς "Τι βιβλίο διαβάζεις;", θέλει να μάθει αν είναι αστείο ή σοβαρό ή συναρπαστικό βιβλίο. Αλλά αν ρωτά "Ποιο βιβλίο διαβάζεις;", θέλει να μάθει τον τίτλο του βιβλίου που διαβάζω.


Και αν βλέπω δύο γραβάτες σε ένα κατάστημα, μία κόκκινη και μία μαύρη, πρέπει να αποφασίσω ποια (which one of these two) γραβάτα θα αγοράσω.


Σου φαίνεται αυτό σωστό;


Γεια

Johannes