Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Iro: Γεια σας, εγώ είμαι η Ηρώ.
Judith: Judith here. Upper Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 16 - Offering congratulations in Greek.
Iro: Hi name is Iro and I am joined here by Judith.
Judith: Hello everyone and welcome back to GreekPod101.com.
Iro: What are we learning today?
Judith: In this lesson you’ll learn how to congratulate someone.
Iro: This conversation takes place at Stefanos and Fortinese wedding reception
Judith: The conversation is between the newlywed couple and the guests.
Iro: The speakers are friends therefore they will be speaking informal Greek.
Judith: Let’s listen to the conversation. Now, this lesson we should talk about Greek well wishes. Iro can you tell me somethings I could say if I want to congratulate a newlywed couple?
DIALOGUE
Ρ, Α: Να ζήσετε!
Στέφανος-Φωτεινή: Ευχαριστούμε! Και στα δικά σας!
Σ: Περάσατε καλά;
Ρ: Ναι, όλα ήταν τέλεια! Χορέψαμε, τραγουδήσαμε...
Φ: Εσύ Αλέξη δε χόρεψες καθόλου, γιατί;
Ρ: Ε, δεν τον ξέρεις τον Αλέξη; Ποτέ δε χορεύει, μόνο τρώει και πίνει.
Φ: Ε, δεν ήπιε πολύ! Ο Νίκος μέθυσε, τον είδατε;
Α: Ναι. Τον πήγε στο σπίτι ο Αντρέας.
Ρ: Λοιπόν, πάμε, μας περιμένει η Ναταλία στο αυτοκίνητο.
...
Ν: Ρέα, είσαι καλά;
Ρ: Όχι, έφαγα πολύ και πονάει το στομάχι μου τώρα.
Ν: Ήπιες σόδα;
Ρ: Ναι, αλλά δεν έκανε τίποτα. Δεν πειράζει, έχω χάπια για το στομάχι στο ξενοδοχείο.
Ν: Αλέξη, δεν ήξερα ότι είσαι φίλος με τον Αντρέα, το Μιχάλη και το Νίκο.
Α: Πρώτα γνώρισα το Στέφανο και μετά τους άλλους. Με το Στέφανο ήμασταν μαζί στο λύκειο για ένα χρόνο αλλά μετά δεν πήγαμε στο ίδιο Πανεπιστήμιο.
Ν: Μάλιστα... Τι σπούδασες;
Α: Σπούδασα interior design στην Αγγλία.
Ν: Πολύ ωραία!
Α: Και εσύ είσαι μουσικός;
Ν: Ναι, παίζω βιολί. Έπαιξα για λίγο καιρό σε μία Ορχήστρα στη Γαλλία αλλά γύρισα στην Ελλάδα. Δούλεψα σε ένα Ωδείο για μερικούς μήνες, αλλά έκλεισε. Τώρα δουλεύω στον "Αυλό", ένα μαγαζί με μουσικά όργανα.
Α: Στον "Αυλό"; Αλήθεια; Εγώ δουλεύω απέναντι από τον "Αυλό", στον αριθμό 55.
Ν: Έλα! Να πάμε για καφέ καμιά φορά.
Α: Οπωσδήποτε.
Ν: Φτάσαμε. Α! Η Ρέα κοιμάται;
Ρ: Τι έγινε; Φτάσαμε; Με πήρε ο ύπνος!
Judith: Now one time slowly.
Ρ, Α: Να ζήσετε!
Στέφανος-Φωτεινή: Ευχαριστούμε! Και στα δικά σας!
Σ: Περάσατε καλά;
Ρ: Ναι, όλα ήταν τέλεια! Χορέψαμε, τραγουδήσαμε...
Φ: Εσύ Αλέξη δε χόρεψες καθόλου, γιατί;
Ρ: Ε, δεν τον ξέρεις τον Αλέξη; Ποτέ δε χορεύει, μόνο τρώει και πίνει.
Φ: Ε, δεν ήπιε πολύ! Ο Νίκος μέθυσε, τον είδατε;
Α: Ναι. Τον πήγε στο σπίτι ο Αντρέας.
Ρ: Λοιπόν, πάμε, μας περιμένει η Ναταλία στο αυτοκίνητο.
...
Ν: Ρέα, είσαι καλά;
Ρ: Όχι, έφαγα πολύ και πονάει το στομάχι μου τώρα.
Ν: Ήπιες σόδα;
Ρ: Ναι, αλλά δεν έκανε τίποτα. Δεν πειράζει, έχω χάπια για το στομάχι στο ξενοδοχείο.
Ν: Αλέξη, δεν ήξερα ότι είσαι φίλος με τον Αντρέα, το Μιχάλη και το Νίκο.
Α: Πρώτα γνώρισα το Στέφανο και μετά τους άλλους. Με το Στέφανο ήμασταν μαζί στο λύκειο για ένα χρόνο αλλά μετά δεν πήγαμε στο ίδιο Πανεπιστήμιο.
Ν: Μάλιστα... Τι σπούδασες;
Α: Σπούδασα interior design στην Αγγλία.
Ν: Πολύ ωραία!
Α: Και εσύ είσαι μουσικός;
Ν: Ναι, παίζω βιολί. Έπαιξα για λίγο καιρό σε μία Ορχήστρα στη Γαλλία αλλά γύρισα στην Ελλάδα. Δούλεψα σε ένα Ωδείο για μερικούς μήνες, αλλά έκλεισε. Τώρα δουλεύω στον "Αυλό", ένα μαγαζί με μουσικά όργανα.
Α: Στον "Αυλό"; Αλήθεια; Εγώ δουλεύω απέναντι από τον "Αυλό", στον αριθμό 55.
Ν: Έλα! Να πάμε για καφέ καμιά φορά.
Α: Οπωσδήποτε.
Ν: Φτάσαμε. Α! Η Ρέα κοιμάται;
Ρ: Τι έγινε; Φτάσαμε; Με πήρε ο ύπνος!
Judith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Ρ, Α: Να ζήσετε!
R, A: May you live!
Στέφανος-Φωτεινή: Ευχαριστούμε! Και στα δικά σας!
Stefanos-Foteini: Thank you! And you, too!
Σ: Περάσατε καλά;
S: Did you have a good time?
Ρ: Ναι, όλα ήταν τέλεια! Χορέψαμε, τραγουδήσαμε…
R: Yes, everything was perfect! We danced, we sang...
Φ: Εσύ Αλέξη δε χόρεψες καθόλου, γιατί;
F: Alexis, you didn't dance at all, why?
Ρ: Ε, δεν τον ξέρεις τον Αλέξη; Ποτέ δε χορεύει, μόνο τρώει και πίνει.
R: Oh, don't you know Alexis? He never dances, he only eats and drinks.
Φ: Ε, δεν ήπιε πολύ! Ο Νίκος μέθυσε, τον είδατε;
F: Oh, he didn't drink very much! Nikos got drunk, did you see him?
Α: Ναι. Τον πήγε στο σπίτι ο Αντρέας.
A: Yes, Antreas took him home.
Ρ: Λοιπόν, πάμε, μας περιμένει η Ναταλία στο αυτοκίνητο.
R: Well, let's go, Natalia is waiting for us at the car.
...
Ν: Ρέα, είσαι καλά;
N: Rea, are you okay?
Ρ: Όχι, έφαγα πολύ και πονάει το στομάχι μου τώρα.
R: No, I ate a lot, and now my stomach is hurting.
Ν: Ήπιες σόδα;
N: Did you drink any soda?
Ρ: Ναι, αλλά δεν έκανε τίποτα. Δεν πειράζει, έχω χάπια για το στομάχι στο ξενοδοχείο.
R: Yes, but it didn't do anything. It doesn't matter, I have pills for my stomach at the hotel.
Ν: Αλέξη, δεν ήξερα ότι είσαι φίλος με τον Αντρέα, το Μιχάλη και το Νίκο.
N: Alexis, I didn't know that you're friends with Antreas, Michalis, and Nikos.
Α: Πρώτα γνώρισα το Στέφανο και μετά τους άλλους. Με το Στέφανο ήμασταν μαζί στο λύκειο για ένα χρόνο αλλά μετά δεν πήγαμε στο ίδιο Πανεπιστήμιο.
A: First I met Stefanos and then the others. I was with Stefanos for a year in high school, but then we didn't go to the same university.
Ν: Μάλιστα... Τι σπούδασες;
N: Yes... What did you study?
Α: Σπούδασα interior design στην Αγγλία.
A: I studied interior design in England.
Ν: Πολύ ωραία!
N: Very nice!
Α: Και εσύ είσαι μουσικός;
A: And you're a musician?
Ν: Ναι, παίζω βιολί. Έπαιξα για λίγο καιρό σε μία Ορχήστρα στη Γαλλία αλλά γύρισα στην Ελλάδα. Δούλεψα σε ένα Ωδείο για μερικούς μήνες, αλλά έκλεισε. Τώρα δουλεύω στον "Αυλό", ένα μαγαζί με μουσικά όργανα.
N: Yes, I play the violin. I played in an orchestra in France for a little while, but I returned to Greece. I worked at a conservatory for a few months, but it closed. Now I work at "The Flute," a store that sells [with] musical instruments.
Α: Στον "Αυλό"; Αλήθεια; Εγώ δουλεύω απέναντι από τον "Αυλό", στον αριθμό 55.
A: At "The Flute"? Really? I work across from "The Flute" at number 55.
Ν: Έλα! Να πάμε για καφέ καμιά φορά.
N: Goodness! We should go for coffee sometime.
Α: Οπωσδήποτε.
A: Anytime.
Ν: Φτάσαμε. Α! Η Ρέα κοιμάται;
N: We've arrived. Ah! Is Rea sleeping?
Ρ: Τι έγινε; Φτάσαμε; Με πήρε ο ύπνος!
R: What happened? We arrived? I fell asleep!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Iro: Well there are three phrases that are really common – Να ζήσετε.
Judith: May you live.
Iro: Να είστε ευτυχισμένοι.
Judith: May you be happy.
Iro: Καλούς απογόνους.
Judith: “Have good descendants.” This is old fashion though.
Iro: Note that you must never say και του χρόνου. This phrase is used to wish someone will celebrate their birthday/name day next year too.
Judith: So if you use this phrase at a wedding, it will be akin to saying that you hope that they celebrate another wedding next year.
Iro: Yes, that’s exactly. In reply to the well wishes, the couple wishes to the men, women who are single και στα δικά σου – this literally means “and to yours too”. But it is used to imply, “we wish to celebrate your wedding too.”
Judith: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Judith: The first word is…
Iro: Χορεύω
Judith: To dance.
Iro: Χορεύω
Judith: Next...
Iro: Τραγουδώ
Judith: To sing.
Iro: Τραγουδώ
Judith: Next...
Iro: Μεθώ
Judith: To get drunk.
Iro: Μεθώ
Judith: Next...
Iro: Πάω κάποιον στο σπίτι
Judith: To take someone home.
Iro: Πάω κάποιον στο σπίτι
Judith: Next...
Iro: Στομάχι
Judith: Stomach.
Iro: Στομάχι
Judith: Next...
Iro: Δεν πειράζει
Judith: “No problem” or “it doesn’t matter”.
Iro: Δεν πειράζει
Judith: Next...
Iro: Χάπι
Judith: Pill.
Iro: Χάπι
Judith: Next...
Iro: Λύκειο
Judith: High school.
Iro: Λύκειο
Judith: Next...
Iro: Αγγλία
Judith: England.
Iro: Αγγλία
Judith: Next...
Iro: Γυρίζω
Judith: To return.
Iro: Γυρίζω
Judith: Next...
Iro: Ελλάδα
Judith: Greece.
Iro: Ελλάδα
Judith: Next...
Iro: Κλείνω
Judith: To close.
Iro: Κλείνω
Judith: Next...
Iro: Όργανο
Judith: Instrument.
Iro: Όργανο
Judith: Next...
Iro: Απέναντι
Judith: Across, opposite.
Iro: Απέναντι
Judith: Let’s have a closer look of the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Iro: The first word we’ll look at is είδα.
Judith: I saw.
Iro: It’s the irregular Aorist past of βλέπω.
Judith: To see.
Iro: Έλα.
Judith: Literally means “come”, but it can also be used to express pleasant surprise.
Iro: Με πήρε ο ύπνος means “I fell asleep”. Literally “the sleep took me”.

Lesson focus

Judith: The focus of this lesson is the Aorist past tense.
Iro: Just like the future tense, there is also an Aorist tense equivalent for the past tense.
Judith: For this, you just take the Aorist stem and you add the regular past tense endings - the same endings that we introduced in the past few lessons. Can you conjugate a verb as an example for us, Iro?
Iro: Yes, σπούδασα. Note that it is not σπούδαζα.
Judith: Yes the “S” sound is sharp “ss” not “zz”. And this means I studied in the Aorist past tense.
Iro: Σπούδασες.
Judith: You studied.
Iro: Σπούδασε.
Judith: He or she studied.
Iro: Σπουδάσαμε.
Judith: We studied.
Iro: Σπουδάσατε.
Judith: You all studied.
Iro: Σπούδασαν.
Judith: “They studied.” So it all looks very familiar, the endings are familiar and the only change to the regular past tense is that the S sound is different. Careful though, if the word is only two syllables, you still have to add the augment ε so that the stress can move to the front. Let’s compare the different forms.
Iro: Πρέπει να γράφω.
Judith: “I must be writing.” It’s the Aorist for long term actions.
Iro: Πρέπει να γράψω.
Judith: “I must write.” With the Aorist for short term actions.
Iro: Έγραφα.
Judith: “I must be writing.” The non-Aorist term for long term action.
Iro: Έγραψα.

Outro

Judith: “I wrote.” The Aorist past tense for short term actions. The Aorist past tense is used more commonly for the non-Aorist past. So, try to understand it now. Well, that just about does it for today. Listeners, do you know the reasons flashcards are also popular?
Iro: It’s because they work.
Judith: We’ve taken this time tested studying tool and modernized it with My Word Bank Flashcards.
Iro: Learn vocabulary using your eyes and ears.
Judith: It’s simple and powerful. Saved difficult and interesting words to your vocabulary list called my word bank
Iro: Master words in your word bank by practicing with flashcards.
Judith: Word in My Word Bank come with audio, so you can learn proper pronunciation.
Iro: While you learn to proper pronounce words by sight
Judith: Go to GreekPod101.com now and try my word bank and flashcards today. We hope you enjoyed this lesson. See you next week.
Iro: Γεια σας, τα λέμε την επόμενη εβδομάδα.

10 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 09:25 PM
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Hi Sanja,


I'm good actually, thank you ❤️️

Also, I'm glad my explanations make sense and help 😄


I totally understand what you mean about passively remembering something! Sometimes it's because you've heard so many times a common structure so you just learn it as a whole expression and can't really explain why it is the way it is.


Happy studying, να 'σαι καλά!


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Sanja
Saturday at 04:45 AM
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Στεφανία,


Once again your explanations are making everything seem more clear, I thank you!


It makes sense, I will keep in mind ACTION vs EVENT and everything that you said. Sometimes I am passively remembering some phrases which are quite frequent and in aorist past tense, but for some I have to think a little before i choose the tense 😄


I hope you are good, best wishes! ❤️️

Sanja

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 07:48 PM
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Hi Sanja,


That's a very good question that requires some conversation. I'll try my best to explain this big topic in a short written comment. I wish you were part of my Premium+ students where I could send you an audio explanation more easily 😅!


The continuous or momentary notion of a verb is, I think, something to be examined on a case by case basis as there can be subtle meanings of a verb that a foreign student may interpret differently from a Greek. For example, what you said about studying being an ACTION that will last a long time is a valid argument that makes perfect sense, however, a Greek in that particular context, will not think of studying as an ACTION that takes a long time, instead, a Greek will think that studying is an EVENT, that you will only do once in your life, similar to other life events such as birth, marriage, divorce, death. Hence the forms να σπουδάσεις and σπούδασα that you mentioned.


This is a typical case where all these different subtle meanings may surge when you have a verb and trying to figure out whether to use the aorist or the non-aorist (i.e. the present tense) stem.


The markers that you also mentioned help indicate whether to use the non-aorist stem. However, when these are absent, and specifically when talking about something you did in the past, you need to first distinguish if the context is that of an ACTION (a long-lasting or momentary one) vs EVENT (a repetitive or single). In case it is an action, keep in mind that both options could be used in some cases. For example, to me, it would still be valid to say χορεύαμε, τραγουδούσαμε when describing what happened at a recent party BUT here in this particular dialogue you do have a small, although not too obvious marker! And that is the question "Περάσατε καλά;" which uses the aorist tense. The speaker shows that the party is seen as a one-off event. Therefore, it makes sense for the answer to be in the same style: χορέψαμε, τραγουδήσαμε, "we danced, we sang

(we had a good time)"... as opposed to:


― Did you have a good time?

― Yes, we were having a good time. We were dancing, we were singing...

See how answering in a continuous way here doesn't feel natural with this question?


I hope all of this makes sense!😅


All the best,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Sanja
Wednesday at 03:11 AM
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Hello,

I am still not sure everytime when to use aorist or non-aorist tense. For example, In the sentence from the test: Δεν πρέπει να σπουδάσεις κάτι που δεν σου αρέσει, i thought we should use σπουδάζεις, because are talking about a future action that will last for a long time (4-5years). Also, in the text Rea says: Χορέψαμε, τραγουδήσαμε for the actions that lasted all night and Alexis says Σπούδασα interior design which also probably lasted for some time.


Are there any other ''markers'' in the sentences that can imply which tense is correct (for example would using ''all day'',''every day'', ''often'' and similar imply that we should use non aorist tense)

Thank you in advance!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 01:29 PM
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Ιουστίνα γεια σου!


Your instinct is right once again! The correct is "Με φιλικούς χαιρετισμούς". It is in accusative.


Γεια,


Stefania,

Team GreekPod101.com

Ιουστίνα
Friday at 09:43 PM
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Thanks for the insight, Stefania!


Με φιλικούς χαιρετισμός (χαιρετισμούς? I copied it into my notes the first way, but now I am wondering if that is correct).


Ιουστίνα

GreekPod101.com Verified
Friday at 02:27 PM
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Hi Ιουστίνα!


Very good questions! I understand what you meant.

To be honest, I wouldn't use “Μην το ψάχνεις...” as "don't sweat it" with anyone else but my close friends, sister and parents.


I must say that this expression is used mostly among younger generations, and older people might feel it's too.... modern and perhaps they wouldn't like it. I can't say it is rude, it is just too casual and modern... The formal "Μην το ψάχνετε..." would not be applicable because it is against the casual nature of the expression... so please don't use it!


Φιλικά,


Stefania,

Team GreekPod101.com

Ιουστίνα
Friday at 04:37 AM
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I didn't state my previous comment well. What I meant to say was that the English "Don't sweat it" is too casual for many settings, but maybe the meaning of "Μην το ψάχνεις" is closer to the English "Don't bother yourself about it" and so would be appropriate in more situations.


Thanks!

.Ιουστίνα
Friday at 01:49 AM
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In the sample sentences is "Μην το ψάχνεις, δεν πειράζει" which is translated to "Don't sweat it, it doesn't matter." Would one say this to, for example, an older relative? "Don't sweat it" is very casual English that I would not use with an older relative, but if the literal translation is actually something like "Don't search for it", I might. What is the usage in Greek? Would you ever use it in the formal (Μην το ψάχνετε, δεν πειράζει"?


Ευχαριστώ!