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Lesson Transcript

Hi everyone.
Welcome to The Ultimate Greek Pronunciation Guide.
In this lesson, you'll learn 13 Greek consonant sounds that are produced by double consonant combinations.
γγ (as in γγαστρώνω)
γγ (as in φεγγάρι)
γγ (as in έγγραφο)
γκ (as in γκολ)
γκ (as in εγκοπή)
μπ (as in μπάνιο)
μπ (as in αμπέλι)
μπ (as in σαμπουάν)
ντ (as in ντουλάπα)
ντ (as in ένταλμα)
ντ (as in ίντερνετ)
τσ (as in τσά2)
τζ (as in τζάκι)
These combinations might seem intimidating at first, but you'll be surprised at how easy they are to tackle.
Are you ready?
Then let's get started!
We will be examining the first four double consonant combinations together. That's because those have pronunciation variations that luckily follow similar patterns or rules, so to make things easier for you we have grouped them according to those rules.
When these four double consonant combinations are at the beginning of a word or within a word but after a consonant, then we pronounce them like this...
"γγ
γγαστρώνω
γκ
γκολ
αργκό
μπ
μπάνιο
μπάρμπας
ντ
ντουλάπα
καλντερίμι"
The first two sounds are like the G in the word 'goggles', while the next two are like the B from 'buy' and D from 'dad'.
γγ/γκ, γγ/γκ (slowly)
γγ/γκ, γγ/γκ (slowly)
μπ, μπ (slowly)
μπ, μπ (slowly)
ντ, ντ (slowly)
ντ, ντ (slowly)
When these double consonant combinations are within a word and after a vowel, they are usually pronounced with nazalization and they sound like this...
"γγ
φεγγάρι
γκ
εγκοπή
μπ
αμπέλι
ντ
ένταλμα"
The first two sounds are like the NG in the word 'finger', while the next two are like the MB in 'amber' and ND in 'end'.
γγ/γκ, γγ/γκ (slowly)
γγ/γκ, γγ/γκ (slowly)
μπ, μπ (slowly)
μπ, μπ (slowly)
ντ, ντ (slowly)
ντ, ντ (slowly)
Many Greeks, especially when they speak casually, might pronounce these double consonant combination as a "dry" G B and D sounds respectively even within a word and after a vowel. But the standard and more refined pronunciation is the way we showed you just now.
Another thing to keep in mind is that the above rule does not always apply to these consonant combinations. Some words, usually foreign or loan words but some native Greek words as well, might behave unexpectedly.
For example the combination of M and P in Greek, are never pronounced as B when followed by a T sound. Every letter in this case is pronounced separately. For example...
"μπτ
Πέμπτη
μεμπτός
σύμπτυξη"
Other exceptions include...
"γγ
έγγραφο
γκ
αλέγκρο
μπ
σαμπουάν
ντ
ίντερνετ"
For the first word, it's like the NG sound in the word 'finger', but instead of a hard G like before, it's with a very loosely held G sound. You should feel a slight buzzing sensation. For the second word, we have a sound that is the familiar G sound of 'goggles'. And in the third and fourth words the double consonant combinations are actually pronounced separately resulting in a M-P sound, like in 'Imperial', and an N-T sound like 'internet'. Let's hear them again.
γγ / γκ (slowly)
γγ / γκ (slowly)
μπ, μπ (slowly)
μπ, μπ (slowly)
ντ, ντ (slowly)
ντ, ντ (slowly)
The next consonant sound is...
"τσ
τσέλο
Τσιτσάνης
τσούζω"
Like the TS in the word 'cats' or 'tsunami'.
τσ, τσ (slowly)
τσ, τσ (slowly)
The final consonant sound is...
"τζ
τζάκι
τζίφος
ατζέντα"
"When these two letters are paired together, they'll create a DZ sound.
It starts off as a d sound, but ends with a z sound.
Here's a great tip. You can produce this sound by saying the word 'dads'."
τζ, τζ (slowly)
τζ, τζ (slowly)
Well done! You just learned 13 Greek consonant sounds.
"γγ (as in γγαστρώνω)
γγ (as in φεγγάρι)
γγ (as in έγγραφο)
γκ (as in γκολ)
γκ (as in εγκοπή)
μπ (as in μπάνιο)
μπ (as in αμπέλι)
μπ (as in σαμπουάν)
ντ (as in ντουλάπα)
ντ (as in ένταλμα)
ντ (as in ίντερνετ)
τσ (as in τσάι)
τζ (as in τζάκι)"
We've now covered every single sound you need to know in order to speak Greek properly. Isn't that great?
In the next lesson, you'll learn about Greek accents.
How difficult were they to learn? Please comment and share your thoughts.
See you in the next Ultimate Greek Pronunciation Guide lesson!

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7 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

GreekPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Feel free to let us know if you have any questions.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 05:10 AM
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Hi Bassant,


The last part that mentions that rule about the T only applies to the ΜΠ combination. In all other combinations, I don't think there are cases where a T sound would follow. So no worries, it's just μπτ > μτ (sound).


I hope this helps,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Bassant G.
Monday at 06:23 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

The last part in the exceptions of ΥΥ ΥΚ ΝΤ ΜΠ after the (t) rule

is there not a rule for it or when to use them exactly ?

I just can't get it :((

GreekPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 04:45 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi George,


Don't worry! Practice makes perfect!


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

George W
Saturday at 12:40 PM
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difficult to wrap my American tongue around some of these sounds. I think the biggest challenge is remembering when and where they are used.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 08:34 AM
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Hi Marco,


With time and practice (by listening a lot of Greek carefully) I'm sure you will get better and better.:thumbsup:

Also, don't worry about the many pronunciation options some clusters might have, because many Greeks often ignore them and pronounce all words in the same way. The above video is for really, really proper pronunciation, like the one journalists must have on the TV. I suggest you keep coming back to this series as you advance in Greek. It's good to know the basics at the very beginning and later when you are more advanced, can go back and "polish" your accent.


Happy studying!


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Marco
Wednesday at 07:34 PM
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Wow, this make it complicated :smile:

so many combinations and different pronunciations