Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, I'm John.
Chrissi: And I'm Chrissi.
John: And welcome to Must-Know Greek Sentence Structures, Season 1, Lesson 5. Expressing What You Want.
John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use a sentence pattern for expressing what you want.
PATTERN
John: For example,
John: "I want a new car."
Chrissi: Εγώ θέλω καινούργιο αυτοκίνητο. (Egó thélo kenúrio aftokínito.)
Chrissi: [slow] Εγώ θέλω καινούργιο αυτοκίνητο. (Egó thélo kenúrio aftokínito.)
John: The pattern for expressing what you want has three elements. First, the strong personal pronoun in the nominative, meaning "I", which is optional.
Chrissi: Εγώ (Egó).
John: Second, the verb "to want" in the first person singular, meaning "I want".
Chrissi: θέλω (thélo).
John: Third, a neuter noun phrase in the accusative, meaning "new car".
Chrissi: καινούργιο αυτοκίνητο (kenúrio aftokínito).
John: Altogether, we have... "I want a new car."
Chrissi: Εγώ θέλω καινούργιο αυτοκίνητο. (Egó thélo kenúrio aftokínito.) [slow] Εγώ θέλω καινούργιο αυτοκίνητο. (Egó thélo kenúrio aftokínito.) [normal] Εγώ θέλω καινούργιο αυτοκίνητο. (Egó thélo kenúrio aftokínito.)
John: You can start this pattern with a noun phrase in the nominative case as your subject. This noun phrase can be a pronoun, such as…
Chrissi: εγώ Egó
John: ...meaning "I," although you can use any noun or name with an article to talk about what someone else wants. Remember, you can even omit the subject altogether, if it is understood by the context.
Next, use the verb "to want,"
Chrissi: θέλω (thélo,)
John: in the correct person and number. Continue with a noun phrase in the accusative case if you want to refer to a specific thing that is wanted, or a verb in the subjunctive if you want to refer to a specific action.
The noun phrase needs to be in the accusative case here, because it's the direct object, and direct objects in Greek are usually in the accusative case. As for the verb in the subjunctive, this will be the focus of a later lesson in this series. For the moment, you only need to know that a verb in the subjunctive is usually preceded by this conjunction…
Chrissi: να (na)
John: ...meaning "to", as in "I want to eat."
Chrissi: Εγώ θέλω καινούργιο αυτοκίνητο. (Egó thélo kenúrio aftokínito.)
John: So remember, to express what you want, start with a noun phrase in the nominative case, which can contain a pronoun or any noun or name, with an article depending on whom you are referring to. Then use the verb "to want," θέλω (thélo) in the correct form, followed by what it is that you or someone else wants, which can be either a noun phrase in the accusative case or a verb in the subjunctive.
John: Here is another example meaning, "I want to sleep." First, we have the verb "to want" in the first person singular, meaning "I want".
Chrissi: θέλω (thélo).
John: Second, we have a verb in the first person singular in the subjunctive, meaning "to sleep".
Chrissi: να κοιμηθώ (na kimithó).
John: Altogether we have...
Chrissi: Θέλω να κοιμηθώ. (Thélo na kimithó.) [slow] Θέλω να κοιμηθώ. (Thélo na kimithó.) [normal] Θέλω να κοιμηθώ. (Thélo na kimithó.)
John: "I want to sleep."
[pause]
Chrissi: Θέλω να κοιμηθώ. (Thélo na kimithó.)
John: How do you say - "I want a book." To give you a hint, "a book" is...
Chrissi: ένα βιβλίο (éna vivlío). [slow] ένα βιβλίο (éna vivlío). [normal] ένα βιβλίο (éna vivlío).
John: "I want a book."
[pause]
Chrissi: Θέλω ένα βιβλίο. (Thélo éna vivlío.) [slow] Θέλω ένα βιβλίο. (Thélo éna vivlío.) [normal] Θέλω ένα βιβλίο. (Thélo éna vivlío.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Θέλω ένα βιβλίο. (Thélo éna vivlío.)
REVIEW
John: Let's review the sentences from this lesson. I will tell you the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for shouting it out loud in Greek. Here we go.
John: "I want a new car."
[pause]
Chrissi: Εγώ θέλω καινούργιο αυτοκίνητο. (Egó thélo kenúrio aftokínito.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Εγώ θέλω καινούργιο αυτοκίνητο. (Egó thélo kenúrio aftokínito.)
John: "I want to sleep."
[pause]
Chrissi: Θέλω να κοιμηθώ. (Thélo na kimithó.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Θέλω να κοιμηθώ. (Thélo na kimithó.)
John: "I want a book."
[pause]
Chrissi: Θέλω ένα βιβλίο. (Thélo éna vivlío.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Θέλω ένα βιβλίο. (Thélo éna vivlío.)

Outro

John: Okay. That's all for this lesson. You learned a pattern for expressing what you want, as in...
Chrissi: Εγώ θέλω καινούργιο αυτοκίνητο. (Egó thélo kenúrio aftokínito.)
John: meaning "I want a new car."
John: You can find more vocab or phrases that go with this sentence pattern in the lesson notes. So please be sure to check them out on GreekPod101.com. Thanks everyone, see you next time!
Chrissi: Γεια χαρά!

8 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Listeners, what do you want?

Anton
Thursday at 05:25 PM
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Hello,


This is my question. They learned me on Crete that if I want to order something to say for example: 'Θέλω να μια μπύρα παρακαλό', but I think according to this lesson it's wrong. I think it should be or: 'Θέλω μια μπύρα παρακαλό' or: 'Θέλω να πιω μια μπύρα (παρακαλό)'. Am I right?


Greetings, Anton

GreekPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:55 AM
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Hi Bonnie,


I'll try to help because what the grammar considers a direct or indirect object is not a matter one can agree or disagree with. It's a rule and it should be accepted as is. Also, remember that the rule said "usually" the accusative that expresses person is the direct object. And it's usually and not always like this because it depends on a verb's meaning among other things.


Let's forget the English/dative/foreign structures because they are not helping us here, let's remove σούπα, and let's focus on the meaning of this verb.


Η νοσοκόμα την ταΐζει. The nurse is feeding her.


Την (her) is a direct object (person) because the active verb ταϊζω requires an object, but according to the verb's meaning ("to feed") you can only feed an animal or a person.

So even when you add extra information, like "soup", the person is still the immediate receiver of the action "to feed" (direct object) and the soup is secondary.


If you are still skeptical, the rule said that you can try to replace one of the accusatives with a prepositional phrase. You will see that την is irreplaceable (direct object) and σούπα could be replaced with με σούπα denoting that the feeding is done WITH the help of SOUP:

Η νοσοκόμα την ταΐζει με σούπα.


So it's clear that the accusative that expresses person here is the direct object.


I hope this helps! Let me know if you have other questions :)


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Bonnie Yelverton
Thursday at 04:55 AM
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I disagree with the concept that when there are 2 accusative objects that the person is the direct object.

Η νοσοκόμα την ταΐζει σούπα. → Ποιαν ταΐζει; → Αυτήν. (direct object - person) Τι την ταΐζει; → Σούπα. (indirect object - thing)

"The nurse is feeding her soup." → Whom is she feeding? → Her. (direct object - person) What is she feeding her? →soup

The nurse is feeding the soup TO her. Not: The nurse is feeding her to the soup!

In most languages with a dative, the person would be dative. Or introduced with a "to/for" word, which indicate indirect object. You

GreekPod101.com
Friday at 02:03 AM
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Γεια σου Μπέατ!


Παρακαλώ 😄


And you said it! It is important to understand why and how verbs forms change. If you understand the 'why' (eg. present vs aorist subjunctive: why are there two?) and 'how' (the rules that define how a stem changes) you know the purpose and the patterns of change that makes learning verb conjugation much easier. It's important to have this understanding so it won't become and endless memorization of verbs forms that don't make sense because you don't know why the change the way they do and how they even become all these different forms.


Keep up the good work, Beat! Slow and steady wins the race!


Να 'σαι καλά,


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Beat Koch
Thursday at 06:51 AM
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Thank you very much Stefania for this clear and useful answer. It helps already to understand why and how the verbs appear in different forms. (And yes my German verb book says Konjunktiv...which is surely wrong 😜)

I will study the other material you sent me in due time.


Ευχαριστώ ξανά για την προσπάθειά σου!


Μπέατ


GreekPod101.com
Wednesday at 02:41 PM
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Hi Beat,


Good question!


Yes, it can be in the present tense subjunctive (not conjunctive, but I understand you had German in mind😉): Θέλω να κοιμάμαι. The term "aorist subjunctive" and "present subjunctive" may be a bit misleading because these forms in the subjunctive do not express time (such as past, present, future), instead they express duration. So the present subjunctive in very recent grammar books is called "continuous subjunctive" because it implies that the action is repetitive or that is continuous. The aorist subjunctive is now called "momentary subjunctive" because it implies that the action is not repetitive and is instead momentary or it lasts very little or happens only once.


So θέλω να κοιμάμαι means "I (always) want to sleep." For example: Τα βράδια θέλω να κοιμάμαι νωρίς. "I want to sleep early at nights." This implies a repetitive action. In English the verb form doesn't show this. We understand this from the context, but in Greek, the verb shows us whether the action is continuous (or repetitive) or not.


Θέλω να κοιμηθώ means I want to sleep (now, in this case, tonight). For example: Θέλω να κοιμηθώ νωρίς σήμερα. I want to sleep early today. (we are talking about a specific night,)


The subjunctive always expresses intention, desire, wish, something that is not necessarily a fact. The indicative expresses a fact.


The lessons 19 and 20 of the Sentence Structure series will explain in full detail the use of the subjunctive, however since at the moment I'm writing this the lesson haven't been published yet, I'll provide the notes to you in person through My Teacher.


Read them and let me know if you have any questions!


Τα λέμε :)


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Beat Koch
Wednesday at 06:25 AM
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Για σου Στεφανία!


Θέλω να μάθω σχετικά με αυτή τη φράση: Θέλω να κοιμηθώ. This is in the Aorist tense. (2nd line of the Dialogue)

Could it also be used in conjunctive present, like: Θέλω να κοιμάμαι ? Is this phrase possible, or might it mean something different?

How do I find the use of the proper time or mood?


Τα λέμε σύντομα.

Μπέατ