Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, I'm Michael.
Chrissi: And I'm Chrissi.
Michael: And welcome to Must-Know Greek Sentence Structures, Season 1, Lesson 21. Making Negative Commands.
Michael: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use a sentence pattern for requesting someone to refrain from doing something.
PATTERN
Michael: For example,
Michael: "Don't make noise, please!"
Chrissi: Μην κάνεις φασαρία, παρακαλώ! (Min kánis fasaría, parakaló!)
Chrissi: [slow] Μην κάνεις φασαρία, παρακαλώ! (Min kánis fasaría, parakaló!)
Michael: The pattern for requesting someone to refrain from doing something has three elements. First, the negation particle meaning "Don't".
Chrissi: Μην (Min).
Michael: Second, the verb "to make" in the 2nd person singular of the subjunctive mood present tense meaning "make".
Chrissi: κάνεις (kánis).
Michael: Third, a complement that consists of a feminine noun in the accusative as an object, and the verb "to plead," all together meaning "noise, please".
Chrissi: φασαρία, παρακαλώ (fasaría, parakaló).
Michael: Altogether, we have... "Don't make noise, please!"
Chrissi: Μην κάνεις φασαρία, παρακαλώ! (Min kánis fasaría, parakaló!) [slow] Μην κάνεις φασαρία, παρακαλώ! (Min kánis fasaría, parakaló!) [normal] Μην κάνεις φασαρία, παρακαλώ! (Min kánis fasaría, parakaló!)
Michael: The simplest way to request someone not to do something is to use the negation particle…
Chrissi: μη(ν) (mi(n))...
Michael: meaning "don't" followed by a verb in the subjunctive.
Chrissi: Sometimes this could be enough for simple commands such as "Don't speak." Μη μιλάς. (Mi milás.)
Michael: However, you can always add a complement after the subjunctive if you need to include more information, such as the object or the expression "please"...
Chrissi: which in Greek is παρακαλώ (parakaló), if you want to make your command or request sound more polite.
Chrissi: Μην κάνεις φασαρία, παρακαλώ! (Min kánis fasaría, parakaló!)
Michael: So remember, the simplest way to request someone to refrain from doing something is to use the negation particle "don't,"...
Chrissi: μη(ν) (mi(n))...
Michael: followed by a verb in the subjunctive and add a complement, if needed, to include more information or say "please,"...
Chrissi: παρακαλώ (parakaló,)...
Michael: ...if you want to make your command or request sound more polite.
Michael: Here is another example meaning, "Don't worry about this." First, we have the negation particle meaning "Don't".
Chrissi: Μην (Min).
Michael: Second, we have the verb "to worry" in the 2nd person plural of the subjunctive mood present tense meaning "worry".
Chrissi: ανησυχείτε (anisihíte).
Michael: Third, we have a complement that is a neuter prepositional phrase in the accusative meaning "about this".
Chrissi: για αυτό (ya aftó).
Michael: Altogether we have...
Chrissi: Μην ανησυχείτε για αυτό. (Min anisihíte ya aftó.) [slow] Μην ανησυχείτε για αυτό. (Min anisihíte ya aftó.) [normal] Μην ανησυχείτε για αυτό. (Min anisihíte ya aftó.)
Michael: "Don't worry about this."
[pause]
Chrissi: Μην ανησυχείτε για αυτό. (Min anisihíte ya aftó.)
Michael: How do you say — "Don't feed the animals."? To give you a hint, "feed" here is...
Chrissi: ταΐζετε (taízete). [slow] ταΐζετε (taízete). [normal] ταΐζετε (taízete).
Michael: "Don't feed the animals."
[pause]
Chrissi: Μην ταΐζετε τα ζώα. (Min taízete ta zóa.) [slow] Μην ταΐζετε τα ζώα. (Min taízete ta zóa.) [normal] Μην ταΐζετε τα ζώα. (Min taízete ta zóa.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Μην ταΐζετε τα ζώα. (Min taízete ta zóa.)
REVIEW
Michael: Let's review the sentences from this lesson. I will tell you the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for shouting it out loud in Greek. Here we go.
Michael: "Don't make noise, please!"
[pause]
Chrissi: Μην κάνεις φασαρία, παρακαλώ! (Min kánis fasaría, parakaló!)
[pause]
Chrissi: Μην κάνεις φασαρία, παρακαλώ! (Min kánis fasaría, parakaló!)
Michael: "Don't worry about this."
[pause]
Chrissi: Μην ανησυχείτε για αυτό. (Min anisihíte ya aftó.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Μην ανησυχείτε για αυτό. (Min anisihíte ya aftó.)
Michael: "Don't feed the animals."
[pause]
Chrissi: Μην ταΐζετε τα ζώα. (Min taízete ta zóa.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Μην ταΐζετε τα ζώα. (Min taízete ta zóa.)

Outro

Michael: Okay. That's all for this lesson. You learned a pattern for requesting someone to refrain from doing something, as in...
Chrissi: Μην κάνεις φασαρία, παρακαλώ! (Min kánis fasaría, parakaló!)
Michael: meaning "Don't make noise, please!"
Michael: You can find more vocab or phrases that go with this sentence pattern in the lesson notes. So please be sure to check them out on GreekPod101.com. Thanks everyone, see you next time!
Chrissi: Γεια χαρά!

3 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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How would you tell someone "don't run in the hallway"?

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:12 PM
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Hi John!


Almost nailed it!


τρέχε > τρέχεις/τρέχετε


In Greek, the imperative does not have a negation. Instead, it uses the subjunctive mood with negation, hence μην + τρέχεις instead of μην + τρέχα (imperative).


So for affirmative commands, we use the imperative.

For negative commands, we use the subjunctive with the negation μη(ν)


I hope this helps!


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

John
Thursday at 11:43 PM
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Μην τρέχε στο χολ!