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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, I'm Michael.
Chrissi: And I'm Chrissi.
Michael: And welcome to Must-Know Greek Sentence Structures, Season 1, Lesson 18. Asking About Time.
Michael: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use a sentence pattern for asking about time.
PATTERN
Michael: For example,
Michael: "When will you arrive in Greece?"
Chrissi: Πότε θα φτάσεις στην Ελλάδα; (Póte tha ftásis stin Eláda?)
Chrissi: [slow] Πότε θα φτάσεις στην Ελλάδα; (Póte tha ftásis stin Eláda?)
Michael: The pattern for asking about time has three elements. First, the interrogative adverb meaning "when".
Chrissi: Πότε (Póte).
Michael: Second, the verb "to arrive" in the 2nd person singular of the simple future tense meaning "you will arrive." But because we're using it in a question, it means "will you arrive".
Chrissi: θα φτάσεις (tha ftásis).
Michael: Third, the feminine prepositional phrase in the accusative meaning "in Greece".
Chrissi: στην Ελλάδα (stin Eláda).
Michael: Altogether, we have... "When will you arrive in Greece?"
Chrissi: Πότε θα φτάσεις στην Ελλάδα; (Póte tha ftásis stin Eláda?) [slow] Πότε θα φτάσεις στην Ελλάδα; (Póte tha ftásis stin Eláda?) [normal] Πότε θα φτάσεις στην Ελλάδα; (Póte tha ftásis stin Eláda?)
Michael: Asking about time in Greek has the same structure as in English.
Chrissi: We start with the interrogative adverb πότε (póte) meaning "when."
Michael: Next is a verb in the form that demonstrates to whom or what you are referring, such as your subject. Next is a complement that contains more details about what you are asking. For example, it can contain the subject, an object, or a prepositional phrase, among other things. Sometimes the adverb "when", plus the verb alone may be enough to ask a question without needing a complement. For example, you can say "When will you arrive?" instead of "When will you arrive in Greece?" if it’s already clear that you mean "in Greece." For example...
Chrissi: Πότε θα φτάσεις; (Póte tha ftásis?)
Michael: So remember, to ask about time, start with the interrogative adverb…
Chrissi: πότε (póte)...
Michael: meaning "when," continue with a verb, and finish with an optional complement that will contain more details about what you are asking about, such as the subject, an object, a prepositional phrase, etc.
Michael: Here is another example meaning, "When was the Athens Olympic Stadium built?" First, we have the interrogative adverb meaning "when".
Chrissi: Πότε (Póte).
Michael: Second, we have the verb "to build" in the 3rd person singular of the aorist tense meaning "was built".
Chrissi: χτίστηκε (htístike).
Michael: Third, we have the neuter noun phrase in the nominative as the subject meaning "Athens Olympic Stadium".
Chrissi: το ΟΑΚΑ (to OÁKA).
Michael: Altogether we have...
Chrissi: Πότε χτίστηκε το ΟΑΚΑ; (Póte htístike to OÁKA?) [slow] Πότε χτίστηκε το ΟΑΚΑ; (Póte htístike to OÁKA?) [normal] Πότε χτίστηκε το ΟΑΚΑ; (Póte htístike to OÁKA?)
Michael: "When was the Athens Olympic Stadium built?"
[pause]
Chrissi: Πότε χτίστηκε το ΟΑΚΑ; (Póte htístike to OÁKA?)
Michael: How do you say — "When will you graduate from university?"? To give you a hint, "will you graduate" is...
Chrissi: θα αποφοιτήσεις (tha apofitísis). [slow] θα αποφοιτήσεις (tha apofitísis). [normal] θα αποφοιτήσεις (tha apofitísis).
Michael: "When will you graduate from university?"
[pause]
Chrissi: Πότε θα αποφοιτήσεις από το πανεπιστήμιο; (Póte tha apofitísis apó to panepistímio?) [slow] Πότε θα αποφοιτήσεις από το πανεπιστήμιο; (Póte tha apofitísis apó to panepistímio?) [normal] Πότε θα αποφοιτήσεις από το πανεπιστήμιο; (Póte tha apofitísis apó to panepistímio?)
[pause]
Chrissi: Πότε θα αποφοιτήσεις από το πανεπιστήμιο; (Póte tha apofitísis apó to panepistímio?)
REVIEW
Michael: Let's review the sentences from this lesson. I will tell you the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for shouting it out loud in Greek. Here we go.
Michael: "When will you arrive in Greece?"
[pause]
Chrissi: Πότε θα φτάσεις στην Ελλάδα; (Póte tha ftásis stin Eláda?)
[pause]
Chrissi: Πότε θα φτάσεις στην Ελλάδα; (Póte tha ftásis stin Eláda?)
Michael: "When was the Athens Olympic Stadium built?"
[pause]
Chrissi: Πότε χτίστηκε το ΟΑΚΑ; (Póte htístike to OÁKA?)
[pause]
Chrissi: Πότε χτίστηκε το ΟΑΚΑ; (Póte htístike to OÁKA?)
Michael: "When will you graduate from university?"
[pause]
Chrissi: Πότε θα αποφοιτήσεις από το πανεπιστήμιο; (Póte tha apofitísis apó to panepistímio?)
[pause]
Chrissi: Πότε θα αποφοιτήσεις από το πανεπιστήμιο; (Póte tha apofitísis apó to panepistímio?)

Outro

Michael: Okay. That's all for this lesson. You learned a pattern for asking about time, as in...
Chrissi: Πότε θα φτάσεις στην Ελλάδα; (Póte tha ftásis stin Eláda?)
Michael: meaning "When will you arrive in Greece?"
Michael: You can find more vocab or phrases that go with this sentence pattern in the lesson notes. So please be sure to check them out on GreekPod101.com. Thanks everyone, see you next time!
Chrissi: Γεια χαρά!

3 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Try translating this question, "When is your birthday?"

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 07:35 AM
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Hi Keith,


Thank you for your feedback!


I understand the confusion about the first person. Sentences like "open a window" supposedly use the infinitive form of a verb, so in reality, this means "to open a window". However, the academic team since the very beginning of GreekPod101, decided not to include "to" in the vocabulary entries or the sample phrases. So since those are infinitives, in Greek we use the dictionary version of a verb which is actually the 1st person singular since we don't use infinitives in the way the English language does.


I can totally understand how this creates confusion at first sight and if it was up to me I would include "to" to be honest. At the moment all I can say is that you should just keep in mind that if there is a verb alone or in a phrase without punctuation, it's probably in the infinitive form which translates to the 1st person singular in Greek.


I hope this helps!


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Keith Craddock
Friday at 09:38 PM
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An excellent analytical piece, particularly the grammar section. One situation, however, I find confusing - you use the first person present tense of the verb (dictionary form) in Greek then translate it as an imperative in English rather than the first person 'I'. An example from the lesson with the given translations:

Άνοιξε το βιβλίο σου. Open your book.

ανοίγω ένα παράθυρο. open a window


The first example is clearly a singular imperative, using the 'second' (non-continuous) stem of the verb, albeit without an exclamation mark. I would translate the second example as 'I am opening a window' since it uses the present (continuous) stem of the verb.

I have noticed this anomaly on a number of occasions, notably 'Word of the Day', which suggests you must have a good reason for it!