Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, I'm John.
Chrissi: And I'm Chrissi.
John: And welcome to Must-Know Greek Sentence Structures, Season 1, Lesson 16. Using the Verb "To Like".
John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use a sentence pattern for discussing likes.
PATTERN
John: For example,
John: "(As for me) I like my job a lot."
Chrissi: (Εμένα) μου αρέσει η δουλειά μου πολύ. ((Eména) mu arési i duliá mu polí.)
Chrissi: [slow] (Εμένα) μου αρέσει η δουλειά μου πολύ. ((Eména) mu arési i duliá mu polí.)
John: The pattern for discussing likes has four elements. First, the 1st person singular strong personal pronoun in the genitive meaning "as for me".
Chrissi: (Εμένα) ((Eména)).
John: Second, the 1st person singular weak personal pronoun in the genitive meaning "I" here in this sentence.
Chrissi: μου (mu).
John: Third, the verb "to like" in the 3rd person singular meaning "like" here.
Chrissi: αρέσει (arési).
John: And last, a complement consisting of a noun phrase in the nominative and a possessive pronoun meaning "my job" + an adverb meaning "a lot".
Chrissi: η δουλειά μου πολύ (i duliá mu polí).
John: Altogether, we have... "(As for me) I like my job a lot."
Chrissi: (Εμένα) μου αρέσει η δουλειά μου πολύ. ((Eména) mu arési i duliá mu polí.) [slow] (Εμένα) μου αρέσει η δουλειά μου πολύ. ((Eména) mu arési i duliá mu polí.) [normal] (Εμένα) μου αρέσει η δουλειά μου πολύ. ((Eména) mu arési i duliá mu polí.)
John: Unlike most sentences that we've seen so far, this sentence doesn't follow the typical SVO structure which is the subject first, then the verb, and finally the object. It follows the OVS structure which is the exact opposite order, with the object coming first, followed by the verb, and lastly by the subject. With that in mind, let's see the elements of this sentence one by one.
Chrissi: The first element is a strong form personal pronoun in the genitive such as the pronoun εμένα (eména) meaning "me" in general or "as for me" in this structure.
John: This element is optional, however. When used in a sentence like this, it just adds more emphasis to the second element and is a weak form personal pronoun in the genitive.
Chrissi: This element denotes the object of the verb which is the element that comes next and is the verb αρέσω (aréso), meaning "to like," in the 3rd person when talking about something we like.
John: This verb is one of the few verbs in Greek that requires the direct object to be in the genitive case. Another peculiarity of this verb is that the person who likes something is not expressed by the subject of the sentence as in English, instead it is expressed by the object. So the first two elements, the two pronouns, indicate who it is that likes something.
John: That something that is being liked is the sentence's subject and it is mentioned in the 4th element which is the complement that comes right after the verb "to like." This complement might include other words too apart from the subject which will usually be either a noun phrase in the nominative case if we are talking about a thing, an animal or a person we like, or it can be a whole phrase with another verb in the subjunctive if we are talking about an action. We'll study the subjunctive at a later lesson.
Chrissi: (Εμένα) μου αρέσει η δουλειά μου πολύ. ((Eména) mu arési i duliá mu polí.)
John: So remember, to discuss likes, you can start with an optional strong form personal pronoun in the genitive followed by a weak form personal pronoun in the genitive. After the pronoun or the pronouns, use the verb "to like" in the 3rd person followed by a complement that will include the subject as either a noun phrase in the nominative case or as a whole phrase.
John: Here is another example meaning, "You (guys) like to cook." First, we have the 2nd person plural strong personal pronoun in the genitive case meaning "you (guys)" as in "as for you (guys)".
Chrissi: Εσάς (Esás).
John: Second, we have the 2nd person plural weak personal pronoun in the genitive case meaning "you" as in "you guys".
Chrissi: σας (sas).
John: Third, we have the verb "to like" in the 3rd person singular meaning "like".
Chrissi: αρέσει (arési).
John: And last, we have a complement consisting of a verb in the subjunctive meaning "to cook".
Chrissi: να μαγειρεύετε (na mayirévete).
John: Altogether we have...
Chrissi: Εσάς σας αρέσει να μαγειρεύετε. (Esás sas arési na mayirévete.) [slow] Εσάς σας αρέσει να μαγειρεύετε. (Esás sas arési na mayirévete.) [normal] Εσάς σας αρέσει να μαγειρεύετε. (Esás sas arési na mayirévete.)
John: "You (guys) like to cook."
[pause]
Chrissi: Εσάς σας αρέσει να μαγειρεύετε. (Esás sas arési na mayirévete.)
John: How do you say — "He likes school."? To give you a hint, "school" is...
Chrissi: το σχολείο (to scholío). [slow] το σχολείο (to scholío). [normal] το σχολείο (to scholío).
John: "He likes school."
[pause]
Chrissi: Του αρέσει το σχολείο. (Tu arési to scholío.) [slow] Του αρέσει το σχολείο. (Tu arési to scholío.) [normal] Του αρέσει το σχολείο. (Tu arési to scholío.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Του αρέσει το σχολείο. (Tu arési to scholío.)
REVIEW
John: Let's review the sentences from this lesson. I will tell you the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for shouting it out loud in Greek. Here we go.
John: "(As for me) I like my job a lot."
[pause]
Chrissi: (Εμένα) μου αρέσει η δουλειά μου πολύ. ((Eména) mu arési i duliá mu polí.)
[pause]
Chrissi: (Εμένα) μου αρέσει η δουλειά μου πολύ. ((Eména) mu arési i duliá mu polí.)
John: "You (guys) like to cook."
[pause]
Chrissi: Εσάς σας αρέσει να μαγειρεύετε. (Esás sas arési na mayirévete.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Εσάς σας αρέσει να μαγειρεύετε. (Esás sas arési na mayirévete.)
John: "He likes school."
[pause]
Chrissi: Του αρέσει το σχολείο. (Tu arési to scholío.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Του αρέσει το σχολείο. (Tu arési to scholío.)

Outro

John: Okay. That's all for this lesson. You learned a pattern for discussing likes, as in...
Chrissi: (Εμένα) μου αρέσει η δουλειά μου πολύ. ((Eména) mu arési i duliá mu polí.)
John: meaning "(As for me) I like my job a lot."
John: You can find more vocab or phrases that go with this sentence pattern in the lesson notes. So be sure to check them out on GreekPod101.com. Thanks everyone, see you next time!
Chrissi: Γεια χαρά!

5 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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What do you like the most?

GreekPod101.com Verified
Friday at 03:28 PM
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Γεια σου Alain!


Πολύ καλά! 😄


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Alain Côté
Wednesday at 10:25 AM
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Thanks, Stefania.


Μου αρέσει αυτή η δασκάλα 😄

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:27 AM
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Hi Alain,


Thank you for contacting us.


Saying "The ice cream pleases me" would be one way to try to explain this. I think in lesson 17 of the Absolute Beginner series it is explained like that by the lesson writer, however, note that the verb "to please" is a different verb from the verb "to like" in Greek. In Greek, it would be "ευχαριστώ" (Το παγωτό με ευχαριστεί) which in turn might create some confusion because ευχαριστώ can also mean "to thank/thank you".


In this lesson, we tried to stick to the same verb "to like" and create a structure that is roughly similar ("The ice cream is of my liking"). Also, since we use English to teach Greek, an example such as the Spanish "me gusta" or the Italian "mi piace" might not make sense to most.


In the end, it all boils down to:

"...with αρέσω (aréso), the subject in English is the object in Greek and the English object is the Greek subject."

Rather than focusing on the cases, such as nominative and genitive.


To be honest, below is the original lesson in video form, regarding this verb, that later the academic team turned into an audio lesson. I hope the video lesson more helpful:

https://bit.ly/3agSvhh


Nonetheless, thank you for your feedback.


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Alain Côté
Tuesday at 08:18 AM
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Hi there! It is hard to understand why you dont just explain the sentence structure and the use of the nominative and genitive cases in the typical μου αρεσει το παγοτοώ type of sentence by simply indicating that the litteral translation to English is "Ice cream pleases me", same as the Spanish Me gusto helado is explained to English speaking students of Spanish. It would avoid all the awkward explanations of why "I" is in the genitive and "ice cream" is in the nominative, and the verb is in the third person when you translate it as "I like ice cream".