Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, I'm John.
Chrissi: And I'm Chrissi.
John: And welcome to Must-Know Greek Sentence Structures, Season 1, Lesson 1. Talking About Your Profession.
John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use a sentence pattern for talking about your profession.
PATTERN
John: For example,
John: "I am a cardiologist."
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι καρδιολόγος. (Egó íme kardiológos.)
Chrissi: [slow] Εγώ είμαι καρδιολόγος. (Egó íme kardiológos.)
John: The pattern for talking about your profession has three elements. First, the strong personal pronoun in the nominative, meaning "I".
Chrissi: Εγώ (Egó).
John: Second, the verb "to be" in the first person singular, meaning "am".
Chrissi: είμαι (íme).
John: Third, the masculine and feminine profession noun in the nominative, meaning "cardiologist".
Chrissi: καρδιολόγος (kardiológos).
John: Altogether, we have... "I am a cardiologist."
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι καρδιολόγος. (Egó íme kardiológos.) [slow] Εγώ είμαι καρδιολόγος. (Egó íme kardiológos.) [normal] Εγώ είμαι καρδιολόγος. (Egó íme kardiológos.)
John: Just like in English, Greek usually follows an SVO structure when it comes to word order of sentences. SVO stands for Subject-Verb-Object. If the verb is a linking verb, such as the verb "to be," then instead of an object, we might have a predicate.
When the verb's subject is a personal pronoun, Greeks usually omit it because the verb itself indicates whether we are talking about the first, second, or third person in either the singular or the plural.
The personal pronoun is used only to make the context clear or for emphasis; for example, to say "It is I who is a cardiologist," instead of saying "I am a cardiologist."
In that case, you can start the sentence with the personal pronoun in the nominative case, followed by the verb "to be" in the first person singular of the present tense.
The subject, in this case the pronoun, and the verb need to always "agree" in person and number. Then at the end of the sentence comes the profession, which is usually a noun in the nominative, but it can also be a noun phrase that describes a profession. A noun phrase may consist of an adjective and a noun, among other types of words.
Finally, note that in Greek, unlike English, the indefinite article "a or an" is not needed before the profession noun or noun phrase.
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι καρδιολόγος. (Egó íme kardiológos.)
John: So remember, to talk about your profession just say "I" in Greek…
Chrissi: Εγώ (Egó)...
John: ...plus the verb "to be," plus your profession. Make sure the profession's gender matches yours or the subject's gender, if you are talking about someone else.
John: Here is another example meaning, "I'm a cashier." First, the strong personal pronoun in the nominative, meaning "I".
Chrissi: Εγώ (Egó).
John: Second, the verb "to be" in the first person singular, meaning "am".
Chrissi: είμαι (íme).
John: Third, the masculine and feminine profession noun in the nominative, meaning "cashier".
Chrissi: ταμίας (tamías).
John: Altogether we have...
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι ταμίας. (Egó íme tamías.) [slow] Εγώ είμαι ταμίας. (Egó íme tamías.) [normal] Εγώ είμαι ταμίας. (Egó íme tamías.)
John: "I'm a cashier."
[pause]
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι ταμίας. (Egó íme tamías.)
John: How do you say - "I'm an engineer." To give you a hint, "engineer" is...
Chrissi: μηχανικός (mihanikós).
John: "I'm an engineer."
[pause]
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι μηχανικός. (Egó íme mihanikós.) [slow] Εγώ είμαι μηχανικός. (Egó íme mihanikós.) [normal] Εγώ είμαι μηχανικός. (Egó íme mihanikós.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι μηχανικός. (Egó íme mihanikós.)
REVIEW
John: Let's review the sentences from this lesson. I will tell you the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for shouting it out loud in Greek. Here we go.
John: "I am a cardiologist."
[pause]
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι καρδιολόγος. (Egó íme kardiológos.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι καρδιολόγος. (Egó íme kardiológos.)
John: "I'm a cashier."
[pause]
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι ταμίας. (Egó íme tamías.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι ταμίας. (Egó íme tamías.)
John: "I'm an engineer."
[pause]
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι μηχανικός. (Egó íme mihanikós.)
[pause]
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι μηχανικός. (Egó íme mihanikós.)

Outro

John: Okay. That's all for this lesson. You learned a pattern for talking about your profession, as in...
Chrissi: Εγώ είμαι καρδιολόγος. (Egó íme kardiológos.)
John: meaning "I am a cardiologist."
John: You can find more vocab or phrases that go with this sentence pattern in the lesson notes. So please be sure to check them out on GreekPod101.com. Thanks everyone, see you next time!
Chrissi: Γεια χαρά!

9 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

What do you do for a living?

GreekPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 01:33 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Ron!


I'm so glad to hear that :)

May I ask what your native language is and what other languages you speak, if any? Just curious :)


Cheers,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

ron casselman
Friday at 05:37 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

❤️️❤️️❤️️❤️️❤️️ greek is so easy for me

GreekPod101.com
Thursday at 02:27 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Γεια σου Μάρντι!


Χαίρομαι πολύ με το σχόλιό σου :)


Ναι, σίγουρα θα σου φανεί εύκολη αυτή η σειρά στην αρχή, όμως είμαι σίγουρη ότι σύντομα θα έχει πράγματα να σου δώσει, γιατί αυτό που θέλεις να βελτιώσεις είναι το να έχουν δομή (structure) οι προτάσεις σου. Πρέπει όμως να κάνουμε ασκήσεις για αυτό! Θα περιμένω 10 προτάσεις για κάθε μάθημα στο My Teacher :).


Όσο για τα άρθρα, εννοείς ότι κάνεις λάθη με την χρήση ("use", not παρακμή = decadence) τους; Τότε ίσως το βίντεο αυτό να σε βοηθήσει με τη χρήση του οριστικού άρθρου γιατί είναι από τις ερωτήσεις που δέχομαι συχνά:

https://www.greekpod101.com/lesson/absolute-beginner-questions-answered-by-stefania-4-how-do-you-use-the-definite-articles/?lp=96


Να 'σαι καλά,


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Mardie Holton-Cleave
Wednesday at 09:40 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Γεια σου Στεφανία,

Μου άρεσε αυτό το μάθημα. Αν και είναι λίγο εύκολο για μένα, εξακολουθώ να κάνω λάθη με την παρακμή του οριστικού και αόριστου άρθρου! I will keep studying! Μάρντι

GreekPod101.com
Wednesday at 02:44 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Γεια σου Μπέατ!


Χαχαχα! Ακριβώς αυτό σκεφτόμουν, ότι είναι σαν μαθηματικά!😅


Να 'σαι καλά,


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Beat Koch
Tuesday at 07:01 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Γεια σου Στεφανία

Σωστά! 123, 132, 213, 231, 312, 321, δεν ήξερα ότι είστε επίσης μαθηματικός :)

Σας ευχαριστώ πολύ για την εξήγηση!

Μπέατ

GreekPod101.com
Monday at 11:12 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Γεια σου Μπέατ!


Ναι, μπορείς να πεις:


Είστε εσείς καθηγήτρια;

ή

Είστε καθηγήτρια εσείς;

ή

Εσείς είστε καθηγήτρια;

ή

Εσείς καθηγήτρια είστε;

ή

Καθηγήτρια είστε εσείς;

ή

Καθηγήτρια εσείς είστε;

ή...

...χεχε, δεν έχει άλλο! Just kidding, there are no more options!


Greek is very flexible because of the declension system and because there are no strict structure rules like in German or Japanese, for example. So... enjoy this flexibility :) In more complex sentences though, it's better to stick to a Subject-Verb-Object structure to be safe.


Τα λέμε!


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Beat Koch
Monday at 04:57 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Όπως ξέρεις ήδη: στη σύνταξη :)


I understand that: Εσείς είστε καθηγήτρια; is a normal phrase becoming a question by the ?-mark. Can you also say: Είστε εσείς καθηγήτρια; as you would render it in English?


Γεια χαρά

Μπέατ