Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hello everyone and welcome back to GreekPod101.com. This is Intermediate, Season 1, lesson 5, A Bit of Greek Girlie Gossip. I’m Brandon.
Stefania: And I’m Stefania.
Brandon: In this lesson, we'll focus on the present tense stem of verbs.
Stefania: This conversation takes place at the house where Erató and Natalía live, and the conversation is between the two of them.
Brandon: The characters are sisters, so they'll be using informal Greek. Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Ναταλία Α, ήρθες κιόλας από το κομμωτήριο; Καλέ, άλλος άνθρωπος έγινες!
Ερατώ Αχ, πολύ μου αρέσουν τα μαλλιά μου ίσια! Μακάρι να ήταν έτσι πάντα!
Ναταλία Τότε γιατί κάθε φορά που θέλω να σ' τα ισιώσω μου λες όχι;
Ερατώ Γιατί δεν θέλω να κάνω ψαλίδα.
Ναταλία Καλά. Έλα να σε βάψω τώρα. Εγώ είμαι έτοιμη.
Ερατώ Η μαμά τελικά σου έφτιαξε το φερμουάρ;
Ναταλία Ναι. Έκανε εκεί μια πατέντα και τουλάχιστον δεν θα ανοίγει.
Ερατώ Πήρα επίσης και τις ψεύτικες βλεφαρίδες. Η κυρία Ελπίδα είπε ότι θα κάνει τα μάτια μας να φαίνονται καλύτερα και μεγαλύτερα στους θεατές.
Ναταλία Ναι, το άκουσα κι εγώ αυτό. Λοιπόν, θα σ' τις βάλω μετά.
Brandon: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Ναταλία Α, ήρθες κιόλας από το κομμωτήριο; Καλέ, άλλος άνθρωπος έγινες!
Brandon: Oh, you are back already from the hair salon? Well, well, you look like a different person!
Ερατώ Αχ, πολύ μου αρέσουν τα μαλλιά μου ίσια! Μακάρι να ήταν έτσι πάντα!
Brandon: Oh, I like my hair straight so much! If only it were always so!
Ναταλία Τότε γιατί κάθε φορά που θέλω να στα ισιώσω μου λες όχι;
Brandon: Then why do you say no every time I want to straighten your hair?
Ερατώ Γιατί δεν θέλω να κάνω ψαλίδα.
Brandon: Because I don't want to have split ends.
Ναταλία Καλά. Έλα να σε βάψω τώρα. Εγώ είμαι έτοιμη.
Brandon: Alright. Now let me do your make-up. I'm ready.
Ερατώ Η μαμά τελικά σου έφτιαξε το φερμουάρ;
Brandon: Did mom fix your zipper in the end?
Ναταλία Ναι. Έκανε εκεί μια πατέντα και τουλάχιστον δεν θα ανοίγει.
Brandon: Yes. She did a trick there and at least it won't be opening.
Ερατώ Πήρα επίσης και τις ψεύτικες βλεφαρίδες. Η κυρία Ελπίδα είπε ότι θα κάνει τα μάτια μας να φαίνονται καλύτερα και μεγαλύτερα στους θεατές.
Brandon: I also got the fake eyelashes. Mrs. Elpida said it will make our eyes look better and wider to the audience.
Ναταλία Ναι, το άκουσα κι εγώ αυτό. Λοιπόν, θα σ' τις βάλω μετά.
Brandon: Yeah, I heard that too. Well, I'll apply them on you later.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Brandon: Now this is a very girlie conversation! Actually, I'm wondering… Do men in Greece go to the same hair salons that women do?
Stefania: Most hair salons are for both men and women and some even offer nail services, but that's a new trend. There are, however, some hair salons that are men-only.
Brandon: What about barbershops?
Stefania: There are some, although with time they are becoming more rare. These are men's only places, just like the Greek traditional coffee houses the "καφενείο". Men go there to socialize and chat while getting their hair trimmed.
Brandon: Do young people go there too?
Stefania: Not really. Usually, it's older men that go – they are more used to a basic style of service.
Brandon: Well, I hope this tradition doesn’t die out! Okay, now let’s move on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Stefania: κομμωτήριο [natural native speed]
Brandon: hair salon
Stefania: κομμωτήριο [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: κομμωτήριο [natural native speed]
Next:
Stefania: μαλλί [natural native speed]
Brandon: hair, wool
Stefania: μαλλί [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: μαλλί [natural native speed]
Next:
Stefania: μακάρι [natural native speed]
Brandon: hopefully, if only (expression for wish)
Stefania: μακάρι [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: μακάρι [natural native speed]
Next:
Stefania: φορά [natural native speed]
Brandon: time (to count instances), direction that something is moving
Stefania: φορά [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: φορά [natural native speed]
Next:
Stefania: ισιώνω [natural native speed]
Brandon: to straighten
Stefania: ισιώνω [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: ισιώνω [natural native speed]
Next:
Stefania: ψαλίδα [natural native speed]
Brandon: split end, shears, a big difference between the highest and lowest price or value (economics)
Stefania: ψαλίδα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: ψαλίδα [natural native speed]
Next:
Stefania: πατέντα [natural native speed]
Brandon: patent, gimmick, trick
Stefania: πατέντα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: πατέντα [natural native speed]
Next:
Stefania: βλεφαρίδα [natural native speed]
Brandon: eyelash
Stefania: βλεφαρίδα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: βλεφαρίδα [natural native speed]
Next:
Stefania: θεατής [natural native speed]
Brandon: viewer, spectator, casual observer, witness (fig.)
Stefania: θεατής [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: θεατής [natural native speed]
And Last:
Stefania: λοιπόν [natural native speed]
Brandon: so, well (indignation, surprise)
Stefania: λοιπόν [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: λοιπόν [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What's our first word?
Stefania: We have "Μαλλί", meaning "hair" or "wool". We also use this word in many idioms that don't make much sense in English if you translate them word for word.
Brandon: Can we have an example?
Stefania: OK, how about "έβγαλε μαλλιά η γλώσσα μου"? Literally "my tongue grew hair"!
Brandon: "My tongue grew hair"? What does that actually mean?
Stefania: Imagine that you're talking-talking-talking to someone trying to convince him of something, but you can't. When you get tired of talking and you want to make that clear to the other person, you can say "Έβγαλε μαλλιά η γλώσσα μου!"
Brandon: ΟΚ! Any other examples?
Stefania: An easy one, "μαλλί της γριάς".
Brandon: Oh I know that one! Cotton candy! Literally "old lady's hair".
Stefania: Yes! There are some extra examples in our notes for our listeners, but for now, let's see the next word. "Μακάρι".
Brandon: This means "hopefully" or "if only".
Stefania: Yes. So this interjection expresses a strong wish or desire and we usually use the "if only" translation when the wish is not realistic, like in our dialogue.
Brandon: Oh, the part where Erató wishes she had straight hair.
Stefania: Yes.
Brandon: So, how do we use this interjection in a sentence?
Stefania: Usually with the subjunctive mood of a verb, that is the "να + verb" form.
Brandon: Ok. Now, what's our last word?
Stefania: "Πατέντα", which means "patent".
Brandon: But in our dialogue, it's used differently.
Stefania: That’s right. It's used casually as a word for "trick" or "gimmick". We use "πατέντα" when someone comes up with a non-sophisticated but smart idea to temporarily solve a mechanical problem or fix a faulty object.
Brandon: Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the present tense stem of verbs and all of the stem categories. Firstly, how do we get the stem from a verb?
Stefania: From the dictionary form of a verb we remove the endings -ω, -άω, -ομαι, -ιέμαι, ούμαι, -άμαι and ώμαι with ωμέγα.
Brandon: And how many stem categories do we have?
Stefania: Depending on the present stem character, that is the final letter or double letter of the stem, we have five stem categories for the first conjugation group of verbs and one for the second group.
Brandon: OK. Let's hear them!
Stefania: So, for the 1st conjugation we have the stems whose character is a vowel or a double vowel, for example, the verb "ακούω", "to hear". But listeners, please note... the double vowels αυ and ευ are an exception.
Brandon: That makes sense. They end in a "v" or an "f" sound when pronounced.
Stefania: Correct! Next, we have the stems ending in a labial consonant, like π, β, φ, and also the double letters αυ, ευ, πτ and φτ.
Brandon: We call them labial because we pronounce them with our lips.
Stefania: Yes, for example, "βάφω", "to paint". Next, we have the stems ending in velar consonants – κ, γ, χ and the double σκ, γγ and χν.
Brandon: We call those velar because we pronounce them with our throat. What’s an example?
Stefania: Έρχομαι, meaning "to come". For the fourth category, we have verbs whose stem ends in a dental consonant, such as τ(τ), δ, θ, or a sibilant consonant such as σ(σ) and ζ. For example "βάζω", "to put".
Brandon: And the last category for the first conjugation is...
Stefania: The stems that end in a liquid or nasal consonant, such as λ(λ), ρ, μ, ν, and the double λν and ρν. For example "θέλω".
Brandon: For our second conjugation group, there's only one category and this includes stems that end in any consonant.
Stefania: Yes.
Brandon: Ok, so is this theory useful?
Stefania: It is! Because depending on the character there is a set of rules, that we'll see in the next two lessons, that apply to it and force it to change in a specific way in order to form the aorist stem...
Brandon: ...And knowing the present and aorist stem of a verb, we can produce all of its forms!
Stefania: That's right! Listeners, please study our lesson notes because verb conjugation is not about memorizing endless verb tables, but about knowing a few rules.

Outro

Brandon: Well, that’s all for this lesson, everyone! Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time.
Stefania: Γεια χαρά!
MARKETING PIECE
Stefania: Listeners, do you know the powerful secret behind rapid progress?
Brandon: Using the entire system.
Stefania: Lesson notes are an important part of this system.
Brandon: They include a transcript and a translation of the conversation...
Stefania: ...key lesson vocabulary...
Brandon: and detailed grammar explanations.
Stefania: Lesson notes accompany every audio or video lesson.
Brandon: Use them on the site or mobile device or print them out.
Stefania: Using the lesson notes with audio and video media, will rapidly increase your learning speed.
Brandon: Go to GreekPod101.com, and download the lesson notes for this lesson right now.

20 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hello Listeners! How would you like to cut your hair? *Try answering in Greek!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:32 AM
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Γεια σου Στίβεν!


I'm really glad you like this series. I wrote it, hehe :)


Actually, you'll be surprised to know the Italian "magari" derived from μακάρι which derived from the ancient μακάριος ("happy", "blessed")😎

https://bit.ly/2YKQfLG


Μπράβο does come from Italian though😅!


Ciao!


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Stephen
Tuesday at 12:55 PM
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Γεια σου!


Another very helpful and interesting lesson. I really like this series!


Also, when the word 'μακάρι' was used, I instantly thought of how it sounds very similar to the Italian word 'magari,' meaning, 'I wish,' or 'I hope so.' It makes me wonder, is μακάρι, like μπράβο, also derived from Italian?


Γεια!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 10:41 AM
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Hi Dale,


Oops! Another typo there. I fixed it. It's like you said: "I will put them (tis) on you (sou)".


Thank you for letting me know and also thank you for the compliment😄


Καλή μελέτη!


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Dale
Tuesday at 08:16 PM
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Thanks!


Does this also explain the stis in the last line?


The translation would be I will put them (tis) on you (sou)?


I remember the first time I saw the expression sto lew. It drove me crazy until I matched it up with the translation, which was, I say it to you.


Again, thanks for the lessons and for the fantastic grammatical notes!


Dale

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 10:43 AM
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Hi Dale,


Thank you for your question. Actually this brought to my attention a typo I have fixed.


It's σ' τα not στα. And yes, it is a contraction of σου in the genitive (indirect object) and the pronoun τα (direct object). Very good!


Let me know if you still have any more questions.


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Dale
Sunday at 02:43 AM
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Staphania,


I think I have it!


Is the contraction really sou + ta, where sou is the dative case and ta is the accusative direct object of the verb?


Dg

Dale
Saturday at 05:58 PM
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Hello Stephania,


I have a question about the sta after the verb va isiwsw.


I recognize the contraction between se and ta, but what I can't make out is why the preposition se is used at all. It seems to me that the verb is transitive, and so should take its object in the accusative case. If I were to try to say something like this I would have just said na ta isiwsw.


Is there a simple explanation for this?


Thanks as always!


Dale

GreekPod101.com
Monday at 11:13 AM
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Παρακαλώ, Denise!


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Denise
Sunday at 12:41 PM
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Thanks, Stefania!


Denise

GreekPod101.com
Thursday at 04:01 AM
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Hi Denise,


Yes, that's what it is. A contraction of the pronoun σου + and the pronoun τις. It's similar to the contraction that happens with the preposition σε + definite article: σε + τις = στις (ex. στις τρεις η ώρα, "at three o'clock"). This is due to a phonological phenomenon called 'apocope'.


More on apocope here:

https://www.greekpod101.com/learningcenter/reference/grammar/21?


More on the contraction of the preposition σε here:

https://www.greekpod101.com/lesson/mustknow-greek-sentence-structures-8-using-prepositions-of-place/?lp=97


I hope this helps!


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com