Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Jenny: Hello everyone and welcome back to GreekPod101.com. This is Intermediate, Season 1, lesson 25, Gossip is a Greek girl's best friend! I’m Jenny.
Stefania: And I’m Stefania.
Jenny: In the last lesson of this series, you’ll learn about conjunctions.
Stefania: The conversation takes place on the terrace of the house where Erato and Natalia live. It's between Erato and Natalia.
Jenny: The characters are sisters, so they'll be using informal Greek.
Stefania: OK, let's listen to the conversation!
DIALOGUE
Ναταλία: Λοιπόν, τώρα που έφυγε και ο Σάκης να πάει να ετοιμαστεί για απόψε, για πες, πώς σου φάνηκε;
Ερατώ: Πώς να μου φανεί δηλαδή; Τι, επειδή χώρισε;
Ναταλία: Ναι, παιδί μου...
Ερατώ: Τι να σου πω... μια χαρά τον είδα. Αφού το είπε και μόνος του, ότι δεν τον νοιάζει.
Ναταλία: Μήπως όμως είναι πληγωμένος και μας το κρύβει, για να μην αισθανθούμε άσχημα ή υπεύθυνες; Γιατί ήταν δικιά μας η ιδέα να πάμε μαζί ταξίδι, βασικά.
Ερατώ: Δεν νομίζω. Ίσως να στενοχωρήθηκε λίγο, αλλά τον ξέρεις τώρα πώς είναι. Ώσπου να φύγει η μία, έχει έρθει η επόμενη. Αν ήταν πραγματικά πληγωμένος, θα μας το έλεγε.
Ναταλία: Τέλος πάντων. Πού σκέφτεσαι να πάμε αργότερα; Για να ξέρω τι θα φορέσω. Σε μερικά κλαμπ ξέρεις πώς είναι οι πορτιέρηδες.
Ερατώ: Προτιμώ να πάμε σ' αυτό που πήγαμε την τελευταία φορά, παρά σε κανένα κλαμπ όπου πηγαίνουν όλες οι ξιπασμένες. Δεν έχω καμία όρεξη να φάμε πόρτα!
Ναταλία: Ναι, δίκιο έχεις. Λοιπόν, κάτσε να του στείλω μήνυμα, για να ξέρει.
Ερατώ: ΟΚ. Στείλε του μήνυμα εσύ. Εγώ θα πάω να τσακίσω την υπόλοιπη καρυδόπιτα! (γέλια)
Jenny: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Ναταλία: Λοιπόν, τώρα που έφυγε και ο Σάκης να πάει να ετοιμαστεί για απόψε, για πες, πώς σου φάνηκε;
Jenny: So, now that Sakis has gone to get ready for tonight, tell me, how did he look to you?
Ερατώ: Πώς να μου φανεί δηλαδή; Τι, επειδή χώρισε;
Jenny: How should he look to me? What, because they broke up?
Ναταλία: Ναι, παιδί μου...
Jenny: Yes, girl...
Ερατώ: Τι να σου πω... μια χαρά τον είδα. Αφού το είπε και μόνος του, ότι δεν τον νοιάζει.
Jenny: What can I say... I think he seemed fine. He even said so himself, he doesn't care.
Ναταλία: Μήπως όμως είναι πληγωμένος και μας το κρύβει, για να μην αισθανθούμε άσχημα ή υπεύθυνες; Γιατί ήταν δικιά μας η ιδέα να πάμε μαζί ταξίδι, βασικά.
Jenny: But do you think he’s hurt and hiding it from us, so we won't feel bad or responsible? Because it was pretty much our idea to go on a trip together.
Ερατώ: Δεν νομίζω. Ίσως να στενοχωρήθηκε λίγο, αλλά τον ξέρεις τώρα πώς είναι. Ώσπου να φύγει η μία, έχει έρθει η επόμενη. Αν ήταν πραγματικά πληγωμένος, θα μας το έλεγε.
Jenny: I don't think so. He might have been a little sad, but you know how he is. By the time one girl goes, the next one is here. If he was truly hurt, he would have told us.
Ναταλία: Τέλος πάντων. Πού σκέφτεσαι να πάμε αργότερα; Για να ξέρω τι θα φορέσω. Σε μερικά κλαμπ ξέρεις πώς είναι οι πορτιέρηδες.
Jenny: Whatever. Where do you think we should go later? I need to know what to wear. In certain clubs you know how the bouncers are.
Ερατώ: Προτιμώ να πάμε σ' αυτό που πήγαμε την τελευταία φορά, παρά σε κανένα κλαμπ όπου πηγαίνουν όλες οι ξιπασμένες. Δεν έχω καμία όρεξη να φάμε πόρτα!
Jenny: I prefer to just go to the place we went last time, rather than going to a club where all those stuck-up girls go. I’m not in the mood to be turned away at the door.
Ναταλία: Ναι, δίκιο έχεις. Λοιπόν, κάτσε να του στείλω μήνυμα, για να ξέρει.
Jenny: Yes, you're right. Let me send him a text message, so he knows.
Ερατώ: ΟΚ. Στείλε του μήνυμα εσύ. Εγώ θα πάω να τσακίσω την υπόλοιπη καρυδόπιτα! (γέλια)
Jenny: OK. You send him the message. I'll go devour the rest of the walnut pie!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Jenny: So Stefania, do Greeks like to gossip?
Stefania: As much as everyone else I think. In Greece we say "Τον κουτσομπόλη πολλοί εμίσησαν, το κουτσομπολιό ουδείς!", which literally means "Many people hate the gossiper, but no one hates gossip!".
Jenny: Is there any social pressure on people because of gossip?
Stefania: In the cities people are relatively isolated, so they don't care much about what goes on next door, but in the villages, where people are closer, everyone cares about everything that happens!
Jenny: So it's more likely you’d have nosy neighbors in a village, right?
Stefania: Yes. Most of the time it's just well-intentioned curiosity, but in more traditional and conservative villages, people might be more judgmental.
Jenny: Just like other places I guess, traditional villages keep to older social standards. So better keep that in mind everyone!
Vocab list
Jenny: Now, let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is:
Stefania: επειδή [natural native speed]
Jenny: because
Stefania: επειδή [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: επειδή [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: πληγωμένος [natural native speed]
Jenny: hurt, wounded
Stefania: πληγωμένος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: πληγωμένος [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: αισθάνομαι άσχημα [natural native speed]
Jenny: to feel bad (guilty), to feel unwell
Stefania: αισθάνομαι άσχημα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: αισθάνομαι άσχημα [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: υπεύθυνος [natural native speed]
Jenny: responsible, person in charge, manager
Stefania: υπεύθυνος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: υπεύθυνος [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: στενοχωριέμαι [natural native speed]
Jenny: to become sad
Stefania: στενοχωριέμαι [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: στενοχωριέμαι [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: ώσπου [natural native speed]
Jenny: till, until
Stefania: ώσπου [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: ώσπου [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: πορτιέρης [natural native speed]
Jenny: doorman, bouncer (in a bar or club)
Stefania: πορτιέρης [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: πορτιέρης [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: ξιπασμένος [natural native speed]
Jenny: pretentious, cocky, stuck-up
Stefania: ξιπασμένος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: ξιπασμένος [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: τρώω πόρτα [natural native speed]
Jenny: being denied entrance
Stefania: τρώω πόρτα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: τρώω πόρτα [natural native speed]
Jenny: And Last:
Stefania: τσακίζω [natural native speed]
Jenny: to crimp, to crush, to devour (metaphorically)
Stefania: τσακίζω [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: τσακίζω [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Jenny: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What's first?
Stefania: First we have Πληγωμένος, which means "hurt,” or “wounded," and ξιπασμένος,
Jenny: Which means "pretentious,” “cocky,” or “stuck-up." Are these adjectives?
Stefania: No. Although they seem to have the -ος ending, which is a common adjective ending, these are actually passive voice participles. We haven't studied participles yet, but just keep in mind that words that end in -μένος, -μένη, -μένο, like πληγωμένος and ξιπασμένος, are most likely passive voice participles that are declined like the normal -ος, -η, -ο adjectives.
Jenny: OK. What's next?
Stefania: Τρώω πόρτα, literally this means "to eat door."
Jenny: It’s used to mean being denied entrance to somewhere. Like a fancy club?
Stefania: Exactly! It's a colloquial idiom using the verb "τρώω," "to eat."
Jenny: It actually makes sense, because when you’re denied entrance it's like the door gets slammed in your face, almost as if you're eating it.
Stefania: We use τρώω in other idioms too like τρώω μπουνιά - "I get punched" or τρώω στη μάπα - "I put up with someone or something."
Jenny: And what's last?
Stefania: The verb τσακίζω meaning "to crimp," "to crush," or "to devour."
Jenny: But this verb has more meanings in Greek right?
Stefania: Yes. For example, it means “to get injured,” “to crash down,” “to defeat,” or “to start looking old,” and it can even be used as a threat.
Jenny: There are more ways to use it in the lesson notes too. Can we hear a few examples?
Stefania: Sure. Tσάκισε πολύ στο πρόσωπο.
Jenny: "His face has gotten really wrinkled."
Stefania: or Έπεσε από τη σκάλα και τσακίστηκε,
Jenny: "He fell on the stairs and got injured."
Stefania: As a threat, you can say Φύγε, γιατί θα σε τσακίσω!
Jenny: "Leave, or I'll hurt you!" Wow, that’s strong! Now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Jenny: In this lesson, you’ll learn about conjunctions.
Stefania: Those are indeclinable words that connect words, phrases or clauses between them.
Jenny: Conjunctions are divided into 2 main categories. Category A is made of subordinate conjunctions that connect a main clause with a subordinate clause...
Stefania: ...and Category B is made of coordinating conjunctions. Those connect grammatically equivalent words, phrases or clauses.
Jenny: For example, two main clauses or two subordinate clauses. Main clauses can stand alone as statements, while subordinate clauses look awkward or incomplete alone.
Stefania: For example, Όταν μιλάει ο καθηγητής, οι μαθητές σωπαίνουν, "When the teacher speaks, the students are quiet."
Jenny: The part "...the students are quiet" makes perfect sense by itself, but the part "When the teacher speaks..." doesn't.
Stefania: Conjunctions are further divided into fifteen groups according to their semantics.
Jenny: Listeners, check the table in your lesson notes and read along as we go through the fifteen conjunction groups.
Stefania: Group one, copulative. These connect words, phrases, or clauses that contain similar ideas or carry on ideas from one part to the other.
Jenny: Two, disjunctive. These indicate that either one of the elements joined by the conjunction is true, or that none of the elements are true.
Stefania: Three, adversative. These express a contrast between the linked elements.
Jenny: Four, inferential or illative. These introduce conclusions.
Stefania: Five, the explanatory conjunction δηλαδή. This connects a word, phrase, or clause with a second element, which explains the meaning of the first more fully.
Jenny: Six, specific. These introduce subordinate clauses after specific verbs, such as speech verbs, in order to express something real and indisputable.
Stefania: Seven, temporal. These help specify another clause in time.
Jenny: Eight, causative. These introduce a cause that justifies what is stated in the main clause.
Stefania: Nine, conditional. These introduce a hypothesis.
Jenny: Ten, final. These help reveal the outcome and the objective of an action described in the main clause.
Stefania: Eleven, consequential. These introduce the consequence of the action expressed on the main clause.
Jenny: Twelve, oppositional and concessional. These introduce an opposition towards what the connected element states, sometimes with a sense of concession.
Stefania: Thirteen, hesitant. These help in expressing hesitation, fear or worry. Number Fourteen is, the comparative conjunction "pará," which helps in distinguishing the second element in a comparison.
Jenny: And fifteen, the volitional conjunction.
Stefania: The volitional conjunction is να. That roughly corresponds to the English "to" when followed by an infinitive. For example, Προτιμώ να πάω.
Jenny: "I prefer to go." In our lesson notes you’ll see we include all of the conjunctions as well as some examples.
Stefania: So please learn them well!

Outro

Jenny: Well, that's it for this lesson and for this series everyone! We hope you enjoyed it and found it useful. If you have any questions or comments, please leave us a message at GreekPod101.com.
Stefania: We’re happy to help!
Jenny: Thank you for listening, and we’ll see you in another series.
Stefania: Γεια χαρά!

5 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! How do you say "gossip" in Greek? 

GreekPod101.com
Friday at 03:35 AM
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Γεια σου Αικατερίνη!


Χαίρομαι που σου άρεσε το μάθημα και σε ευχαριστούμε για την πρότασή σου.


Είναι μια καλή ιδέα που θα μπορούσαμε να τη λάβουμε υπόψη μας πιθανώς για τη δημιουργία κάποιας λίστας λεξιλογίου (vocabulary list) ώστε να είναι όλες οι λέξεις μαζεμένες και να μπορείς να τις προσθέσεις στα Flashcards σου. Επειδή όμως υπάρχουν πάρα πολλοί σύνδεσμοι, η λίστα μπορεί να μην τους περιλαμβάνει όλους και να περιλαμβάνει μόνο τους πιο κύριους.


Θα το προτείνω αυτό στην content team μας και ελπίζω να ληφθεί υπόψη.


Και πάλι σε ευχαριστούμε πολύ!


Φιλικά,


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Αικατερίνη
Thursday at 09:49 AM
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Γειά σας!


Σάς ευχαριστώ για το μάθημα! Θα ήταν πολύ χρήσιμο άμα κάνετε μία λίστα για το flashcards με όλοι οι σύνδεσμοι. Πάντα μπερδέυω αυτές τις μικρές λέξεις.


Αυτό ισχύει ιδιαίτερα για τα βιβλία, όπου τα χρησιμοποιούνται συνεχώς.


GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 09:42 AM
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Γεια σου Κάτι!


Μπράβο σου! Καλή συνέχεια!


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Κατι
Saturday at 04:23 AM
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Gossip in Greek is: το κουτσομπολιό. It is in the lesson notes in the saying: "Τον κουτσομπόλη πολλοί εμίσησαν, το κουτσομπολιό ουδείς!"


So, now I'm finnished with intermediate course, and I continue on the upper intermediate course. Thank you so far, Stefania and Nektarios!


- Kati