Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Jenny: Hello everyone and welcome back to GreekPod101.com. This is Intermediate, Season 1, lesson 24, A Greek Relationship Comes to an End. I’m Jenny.
Stefania: And I’m Stefania.
Jenny: In this lesson, we’ll focus on adverbs and specifically on their derivation, their endings and their degrees.
Stefania: The conversation takes place on the terrace of the house where Erato and Natalia live. It's between Erato, Natalia and Sakis.
Jenny: The characters are good friends, so they’ll be using informal Greek.
Stefania: OK, let's listen to the conversation!
DIALOGUE
Ερατώ: Λοιπόν Σάκη. Πες μας τα νέα σου. Τι έγινε με τη Φιλιώ τελικά; Είναι πιο ήρεμη τώρα;
Σάκης: Τι έγινε; Τα χαλάσαμε...
Ναταλία: Σοβαρά;
Σάκης: Ε, ναι. Δεν γινότανε άλλο πια. Μετά το ταξίδι τσακωθήκαμε άσχημα. Τι να πω... ήταν επιεικώς απαράδεκτη με τη συμπεριφορά της τώρα τελευταία.
Ερατώ: Ωραιότατα! Χίλιες φορές καλύτερα έτσι. Εμείς βέβαια σου το είχαμε πει αρχύτερα, αλλά δεν μας άκουγες! Αυτή δεν ήταν για σένα. Δεν σε άφηνε να βγαίνεις και πολύ έξω συχνά, ούτε καν μαζί μας όπως παλιά.
Ναταλία: Τουλάχιστον θα έχεις λιγότερες σκοτούρες από 'δω και στο εξής. Όσο το γρηγορότερο την ξεχάσεις, τόσο το καλύτερο.
Σάκης: Παιδιά, ειλικρινά ελάχιστα με νοιάζει. Το μόνο που έχω μετανιώσει είναι που δεν χωρίσαμε νωρίτερα. Θα είχα περάσει πολύ καλύτερα στη Σαντορίνη.
Ερατώ: Ε, μη σκέφτεσαι τώρα έτσι. Ό,τι έγινε, έγινε. Εγώ μάλιστα προτείνω να βγούμε έξω απόψε, να ξεσκάσεις κι εσύ.
Σάκης: Συμφωνώ! Λοιπόν, πάμε κάπου παραλιακή;
Ναταλία: Μέσα!
Jenny: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Ερατώ: Λοιπόν Σάκη. Πες μας τα νέα σου. Τι έγινε με τη Φιλιώ τελικά; Είναι πιο ήρεμη τώρα;
Jenny: So, Saki. Tell us your news. What happened with Filio in the end? Has she calmed down?
Σάκης: Τι έγινε; Τα χαλάσαμε...
Jenny: What happened? We broke up....
Ναταλία: Σοβαρά;
Jenny: Seriously?
Σάκης: Ε, ναι. Δεν γινότανε άλλο πια. Μετά το ταξίδι τσακωθήκαμε άσχημα. Τι να πω... ήταν επιεικώς απαράδεκτη με τη συμπεριφορά της τώρα τελευταία.
Jenny: Oh, yes. I couldn't go on anymore. After the trip we had an ugly fight. What can I say... her behavior has been unacceptable lately, to say the least.
Ερατώ: Ωραιότατα! Χίλιες φορές καλύτερα έτσι. Εμείς βέβαια σου το είχαμε πει αρχύτερα, αλλά δεν μας άκουγες! Αυτή δεν ήταν για σένα. Δεν σε άφηνε να βγαίνεις και πολύ έξω συχνά, ούτε καν μαζί μας όπως παλιά.
Jenny: Great! It's a thousand times better this way. We told you before of course, but you wouldn't listen to us! She wasn't for you. She wouldn't even let you go out very often, not even with us like in the old days.
Ναταλία: Τουλάχιστον θα έχεις λιγότερες σκοτούρες από 'δω και στο εξής. Όσο το γρηγορότερο την ξεχάσεις, τόσο το καλύτερο.
Jenny: At least you'll have less to worry about from now on. The quicker you forget about her, the better.
Σάκης: Παιδιά, ειλικρινά ελάχιστα με νοιάζει. Το μόνο που έχω μετανιώσει είναι που δεν χωρίσαμε νωρίτερα. Θα είχα περάσει πολύ καλύτερα στη Σαντορίνη.
Jenny: Girls, honestly, I barely even care. The only thing I regret is that we didn't break up earlier. I would have had a much better time in Santorini.
Ερατώ: Ε, μη σκέφτεσαι τώρα έτσι. Ό,τι έγινε, έγινε. Εγώ μάλιστα προτείνω να βγούμε έξω απόψε, να ξεσκάσεις κι εσύ.
Jenny: Oh, don't think like that. What's done is done. In fact, I suggest we go out tonight, so you can blow off some steam.
Σάκης: Συμφωνώ! Λοιπόν, πάμε κάπου παραλιακή;
Jenny: I agree! So, should we go somewhere along the coastal avenue?
Ναταλία: Μέσα!
Jenny: I'm in!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Jenny: What's this coastal avenue they mentioned?
Stefania: They were talking about Poseidonos Avenue. It runs through the southern coastal suburbs of Athens. There are lots of clubs, bars and restaurants there.
Jenny: So, what’s the nightlife like in Greece?
Stefania: It's very lively. People go out for dinner and then usually go for drinks or clubbing.
Jenny: Are these the only options for entertainment at night?
Stefania: There are more options of course, for example there are places where they feature Greek urban folk singing, called "bouzoukia," or places that play much older Greek urban folk music, called "rebetadika." The first look more like big nightclubs with tables, while the latter are more like a taverna with space for a small orchestra. There's even Cretan entertainment venues, where people dance to Cretan folk music.
Jenny: Those are some good tips, listeners! Now let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
Vocab list
Jenny: The first phrase we shall see is:
Stefania: τα χαλάω (με) [natural native speed]
Jenny: to break up
Stefania: τα χαλάω (με) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: τα χαλάω (με) [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: τσακώνομαι [natural native speed]
Jenny: to fight, to quarrel
Stefania: τσακώνομαι [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: τσακώνομαι [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: επιεικώς [natural native speed]
Jenny: indulgently, leniently
Stefania: επιεικώς [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: επιεικώς [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: απαράδεκτος [natural native speed]
Jenny: unacceptable, disgraceful, out of line
Stefania: απαράδεκτος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: απαράδεκτος [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: τώρα τελευταία [natural native speed]
Jenny: lately
Stefania: τώρα τελευταία [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: τώρα τελευταία [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: ούτε καν [natural native speed]
Jenny: not even
Stefania: ούτε καν [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: ούτε καν [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: παλιά [natural native speed]
Jenny: in the old days
Stefania: παλιά [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: παλιά [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: σκοτούρα [natural native speed]
Jenny: trouble, worry
Stefania: σκοτούρα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: σκοτούρα [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: ξεσκάω [natural native speed]
Jenny: to blow off steam
Stefania: ξεσκάω [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: ξεσκάω [natural native speed]
Jenny: And Last:
Stefania: παραλιακή [natural native speed]
Jenny: coastal road, street or avenue
Stefania: παραλιακή [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: παραλιακή [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Jenny: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What's first?
Stefania: The expression τα χαλάω (με), meaning "to break up." The verb χαλάω means "to break down" or "to spoil."
Jenny: It's easy to see why this idiom means "to break up!" What you need to remember here is that we always use the article "ta" before the verb in this idiom.
Stefania: When we need to say that "someone broke up WITH someone," "with" is expressed by using "με" after the verb.
Jenny: If it's not important to mention who broke up with whom, you can omit "me" and use the verb in the first person plural.
Stefania: For example, "Τα χαλάσαμε."
Jenny: "We broke up." OK. Next?
Stefania: We have the adverb επιεικώς, meaning "indulgently" or "leniently." It derives from the adjective επιεικής, meaning "lenient."
Jenny: As in “not strict with somebody.” In our dialogue it’s translated differently though.
Stefania: Yes. There, επιεικώς is used to modify the adjective απαράδεκτη, meaning "unacceptable." The character is talking about a certain unacceptable behavior, and uses επιεικώς to imply that απαράδεκτη is a milder term than the one he feels he should be using.
Jenny: So that's why we translated it as "to say the least."
Stefania: Exactly! Lastly we have the feminine noun "παραλιακή,"
Jenny: Which means "coastal road, street or avenue."
Stefania: This feminine noun derives from the adjective "παραλιακός", meaning "coastal."
Jenny: Like we mentioned before, in the dialogue this word refers to a very specific Avenue.
Stefania: Right, it refers to Poseidonos Avenue in the southern coastal suburbs of Athens.
Jenny: It's a busy road with a ton of beaches and entertainment options, so the area around Poseidonos Avenue is an upscale place to live. Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Stefania: In this lesson, you’ll learn about adverbs and specifically about how they are derived, endings, and degrees.
Jenny: Greek adverbs may derive from verbs, nouns, adjectives, passive voice participles, other adverbs or even phrases. However, not all adverbs are derivatives.
Stefania: There are some true adverbs as well, for example χθες, "yesterday."
Jenny: Luckily, although there are thousands of Greek adverbs, many of them can be categorized according to the type of word they derive from.
Stefania: We also see some common endings in each category. For example, many adverbs that derive from -ος adjectives or passive voice participles end in -α, for example, γλυκός becomes γλυκά...
Jenny: … meaning "sweet” and “sweetly"...
Stefania: … or they end in -ως, for example, κύριος becomes κυρίως...
Jenny: … meaning "main” and “mainly"...
Stefania: There are also adjectives that produce both -α and -ως adverbs. For example άδικος, meaning "unfair," gives us "αδίκως" and "άδικα."
Jenny: They both mean “unfairly.” These pairs might have the same meaning, like we just saw, but sometimes they don't. That’s because sometimes the adjectives these pairs of adverbs derive from, are actually different.
Stefania: For example ακριβά, meaning "expensively" comes from ακριβός, "expensive", while ακριβώς with ωμέγα, meaning "exactly," comes from ακριβής, "exact." This doesn't always happen though!
Jenny: Listeners, check our lesson notes for a more detailed explanation of all the derivative categories and the common adverb endings. Now, let's move on to the adverb degrees.
Stefania: Just like adjectives, adverbs form comparative and superlative forms as well.
Jenny: Here too, depending on the type of word each adverb derives from AND the adverb's ending, we have a few categories that define the formation of the adverb's degrees. Basically, we may have phrasal forms, monolectic – or one-word – forms, or both.
Stefania: The phrasal comparative forms follow the pattern πιο meaning”more,” plus the adverb in the positive degree which is the normal adverb, while the phrasal superlative forms use the pattern πολύ, “very,” plus the adverb in the positive degree.
Jenny: And the monolectic forms?
Stefania: For the monolectic comparative and superlative forms sometimes we have the endings -τερα and -τατα respectively. For example ωραία, meaning "nicely," becomes ωραιότερα and ωραιότατα. Sometimes we have the endings -έστερα and -έστατα, for example αγενώς meaning "rudely," becomes αγενέστερα and αγενέστατα in the comparative and superlative degrees respectively.
Jenny: Just keep in mind that aside from all the categories we have here, there are also many exceptions.
Stefania: So make sure to check out our lesson notes!

Outro

Jenny: And that's it for this lesson everyone! Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time.
Stefania: Γεια χαρά!

6 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Hi Listeners! Let's practice here!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 11:31 AM
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Hi Elias,


That's a good question.


The second way is correct actually:

beautiful, more beautiful, VERY beautiful


To say "the most beautiful" we say τα πιο ωραία not ωραιότατα.


Cheers,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Elias
Friday at 12:52 AM
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Hi Stefania,

Can i translate these in English like these:

ωραίος, ωραιό-τερα / πιο ωραία, ωραιό-τατα / πολύ ωραία = beautiful, more beautiful, MOST beautiful


or its better to translate like these:

ωραίος, ωραιό-τερα / πιο ωραία, ωραιό-τατα / πολύ ωραία = beautiful, more beautiful, VERY beautiful


Thank you.

Κατι
Friday at 10:36 PM
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Ευχαριστώ πολύ, Στεφανία!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Friday at 05:43 PM
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Γεια σου Κάτι!


μέχρι το ύψος του = literally "up to the height", meaning "up to the point" (it's like a horizontal height!)


When talking about a specific point on a street, usually a long street, avenue or highway, we use this expression.


I hope it helps!

Καλά να περάσεις στην Εύβοια και καλό καλοκαίρι και σε σένα!


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Κατι
Friday at 04:10 AM
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Γειά!


Can you explain the phrase "μέχρι το ύψος του" in the example sentence:


Θα ακολουθήσεις την παραλιακή μέχρι το ύψος του ξενοδοχείου «Όασις».

"You are going to follow the coastal road until you reach the "Oasis" hotel.


Ευχαριστώ!

Μεθαύριο θα ταξιδέψαμε στην Έυβοια!

Κάλο καλοκαίρι!!

- Kati