Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Jenny: Hello everyone and welcome back to GreekPod101.com. This is Intermediate, Season 1, lesson 23, This Greek Lunch Was a Success! I’m Jenny.
Stefania: And I’m Stefania.
Jenny: In this lesson, you’ll learn about adverbs and specifically how we categorize them according to their semantics.
Stefania: The conversation takes place on the terrace of the house where Erato and Natalia live, and it’s between Erato, Natalia and Sakis.
Jenny: The characters are good friends, so they'll be using informal Greek. Let's listen to the conversation!
DIALOGUE
Σάκης: Κορίτσια, σας ευχαριστώ για το γεύμα. Κάθε φορά που τρώω εδώ, είναι όλα νοστιμότατα.
Ναταλία: Μη βιάζεσαι να βγάλεις συμπεράσματα! Ως επιδόρπιο έχουμε την καρυδόπιτα που έφτιαξε η Ερατώ.
Ερατώ: Δοκίμασέ την αν θες και πες μου αν σ' αρέσει.
Σάκης: Βεβαίως.
Ερατώ: Την έφτιαξα χτες. Βάλε όμως και παγωτό καϊμάκι μαζί. Κάτσε να σου φέρω από το ψυγείο...
(...)
Σάκης: Μμμ... πολύ καλή! Τόσο νόστιμη καρυδόπιτα δεν έχω ξαναφάει ποτέ! Είναι μαλακιά σαν σφουγγάρι.
Ναταλία: Ίσως έτυχε...
Ερατώ: ...Αλλά πέτυχε! (γέλια)
Σάκης: Τελικά, καλά φάγαμε και σήμερα. Γεια στα χέρια σου Ερατώ!
Jenny: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Σάκης: Κορίτσια, σας ευχαριστώ για το γεύμα. Κάθε φορά που τρώω εδώ, είναι όλα νοστιμότατα.
Jenny: Girls, thank you for the meal. Every time I eat here, everything is delicious.
Ναταλία: Μη βιάζεσαι να βγάλεις συμπεράσματα! Ως επιδόρπιο έχουμε την καρυδόπιτα που έφτιαξε η Ερατώ.
Jenny: Don’t jump to conclusions so quick! For dessert we have the walnut pie that Erato made.
Ερατώ: Δοκίμασέ την αν θες και πες μου αν σ' αρέσει.
Jenny: Try it if you want, and tell me if you like it.
Σάκης: Βεβαίως.
Jenny: Certainly.
Ερατώ: Την έφτιαξα χτες. Βάλε όμως και παγωτό καϊμάκι μαζί. Κάτσε να σου φέρω από το ψυγείο...
Jenny: I made it yesterday. But put some "kaimaki" ice cream on it too. Let me get you some from the fridge...
(...)
Jenny(...)
Σάκης: Μμμ... πολύ καλή! Τόσο νόστιμη καρυδόπιτα δεν έχω ξαναφάει ποτέ! Είναι μαλακιά σαν σφουγγάρι.
Jenny: Mmm... very good! I've never had such a delicious walnut pie before! It's soft as a sponge.
Ναταλία: Ίσως έτυχε...
Jenny: Maybe it's just pure luck...
Ερατώ: ...Αλλά πέτυχε! (γέλια)
Jenny: ... but it was a success! (laughs)
Σάκης: Τελικά, καλά φάγαμε και σήμερα. Γεια στα χέρια σου Ερατώ!
Jenny: So we had good food today too. Well done Erato!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Jenny: What's that ice cream that was mentioned in the dialogue?
Stefania: The "kaimaki" ice cream. It's white and it has a very elastic texture because it has salep in it. Salep is a thickening agent that looks like flour and comes from purple orchid root.
Jenny: What's it taste like?
Stefania: Sweet, creamy and very aromatic. The ingredients are milk, sugar, salep, clotted cream and mastic resin from Chios island, which gives it a distinct aroma. Trust me, it tastes like heaven!
Jenny: Is it commonly served with Greek walnut pie?
Stefania: Yes. Basically you can either eat "kaimaki" ice cream alone, with some toppings like sour cherry syrup, or a “spoon sweet” and pistachio or roasted almond slices, or alongside desserts such as Greek walnut pie and κανταΐφι, a dessert that looks like very thin noodles, soaked in syrup and wrapped around ground nuts.
Jenny: All of that sounds delicious!
Vocab list
Jenny: Now let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is:
Stefania: γεύμα [natural native speed]
Jenny: lunch, meal
Stefania: γεύμα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: γεύμα [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: βιάζομαι [natural native speed]
Jenny: to be in a hurry
Stefania: βιάζομαι [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: βιάζομαι [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: βγάζω συμπέρασμα [natural native speed]
Jenny: to reach a conclusion/to jump to a conclusion
Stefania: βγάζω συμπέρασμα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: βγάζω συμπέρασμα [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: επιδόρπιο [natural native speed]
Jenny: dessert
Stefania: επιδόρπιο [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: επιδόρπιο [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: καϊμάκι [natural native speed]
Jenny: foam on freshly prepared Greek coffee, clotted cream
Stefania: καϊμάκι [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: καϊμάκι [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: μαλακός [natural native speed]
Jenny: soft, squishy, gentle (for people)
Stefania: μαλακός [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: μαλακός [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: σφουγγάρι [natural native speed]
Jenny: sponge
Stefania: σφουγγάρι [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: σφουγγάρι [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: Δεν έτυχε, πέτυχε! [natural native speed]
Jenny: motto from a popular Greek commercial denoting that something was very successful
Stefania: Δεν έτυχε, πέτυχε! [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: Δεν έτυχε, πέτυχε! [natural native speed]
Jenny: Next:
Stefania: τρώω καλά [natural native speed]
Jenny: to eat well in terms of quantity and quality, to be well-fed
Stefania: τρώω καλά [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: τρώω καλά [natural native speed]
Jenny: And Last:
Stefania: γεια στα χέρια σου [natural native speed]
Jenny: compliment to a cook for a good meal, roughly "bless your hands"
Stefania: γεια στα χέρια σου [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: γεια στα χέρια σου [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Jenny: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What's first?
Stefania: First we have the noun καϊμάκι.
Jenny: By itself this refers to either the thick and foamy top layer of the traditional Greek coffee, or to clotted cream.
Stefania: The plural form is καϊμάκια. But keep in mind that we never use the genitive form of this noun.
Jenny: Why not?
Stefania: The forms καϊμακιού and καϊμακιών sound just.... horrible.
Jenny: So a Greek person would use a phrase instead?
Stefania: Right. For example, η υφή που έχει το καϊμάκι,
Jenny: "the texture that kaimaki has,"
Stefania: instead of η υφή του καϊμακιού,
Jenny: "kaimaki's texture.” The first one definitely sounded better!
Stefania: Exactly! Next we have a motto from a popular old Greek commercial. The commercial quickly showed the total preparation of a traditional baked food, ending with the line "...δεν έτυχε, πέτυχε." This means that something was very successful.
Jenny: And do Greeks use this line a lot?
Stefania: Yes, quite often! Πέτυχε means "it was successful." Έτυχε comes from the verb τυχαίνω, meaning "to occur," or to "happen." This word comes from τύχη, meaning "luck."
Jenny: So the phrase basically means that something didn't just happen because of pure luck, and it didn't just occur, it was actually the successful result of study or effort. What’s last?
Stefania: We have the expression γεια στα χέρια σου, which we use as a "thank you" or a "well done" to a person who prepared a great meal. Γεια comes from υγεία meaning "health," so this is like saying literally "health to your hands."
Jenny: I think a natural way to say it in English would be “bless your hands.” That's a nice compliment actually!
Stefania: Oh, and when speaking in formal Greek, you can replace σου with σας and say γεια στα χέρια σας.
Jenny: Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Stefania: In this lesson, you’ll learn about adverbs and specifically how we categorize them according to their semantics.
Jenny: So first of all, Greek adverbs are indeclinable words that usually modify a verb, hence the name "adverb," although they can also modify adjectives, nouns, numerals, other adverbs and even whole phrases. Adverbs are divided into 5 main categories.
Stefania: First, we have τοπικά επιρρήματα. These denote location and answer the question πού;...
Jenny: ...meaning "where?" They are “locative adverbs.”
Stefania: For example εκεί meaning "there," κάπου meaning "somewhere," or μέσα meaning "in/inside" and so on. Second are χρονικά επιρρήματα, that denote time and answer the question πότε;...
Jenny: ...meaning "when?" They are “temporal adverbs.”
Stefania: For example, αργά meaning "late," τώρα meaning "now" or ποτέ meaning "never," and so on. Third, we have τροπικά επιρρήματα, which denote manner. These answer the question πώς;...
Jenny: ...meaning "how?" These are “qualitative adverbs.”
Stefania: For example, κάπως meaning "somehow", έτσι meaning "like this," or ωραία meaning "nicely."
Jenny: The fourth category is quantitative adverbs...
Stefania: ...ποσοτικά επιρρήματα.
Jenny: These denote degree and answer the question "how much?"...
Stefania: Πόσο; For example τόσο - "that much," λίγο - "a little" or πολύ - "a lot."
Jenny: Finally, we have the modal adverbs that denote how certain we are about something through confirmation, hesitation or negation.
Stefania: Hence their Greek names βεβαιωτικά, διστακτικά and αρνητικά επιρρήματα.
Jenny: Can we have some examples?
Stefania: Here we have words like "yes/no" which are ναι/όχι, βεβαίως meaning “certainly," ίσως meaning “maybe,” σωστά meaning “right," and so on.
Jenny: There are countless Greek adverbs, but of course your goal shouldn't be to learn all of them at once. In our lesson notes we include tables with the most useful ones, organized according to their adverb category.
Stefania: In addition to the five main categories, all adverbs except the modal ones can be further categorized into interrogative, indefinite, demonstrative, and relative adverbs.
Jenny: There are also many adverbs that don't belong to any of these subcategories. Those fall under the "various" subcategory. As a final note, keep in mind that the questions asked using the interrogative adverbs, like "where?" or "when?" for example, can always be answered by using some of the indefinite, demonstrative and relative adverbs.
Stefania: These four groups are called συσχετικά επιρρήματα in Greek, because they correlate.
Jenny: As always, check out our lesson notes for more details.

Outro

Jenny: And that's all for this lesson everyone! Thank you for listening, and we’ll see you next time.
Stefania: Γεια χαρά!

13 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Hi Listeners! Have you ever tried the καϊμάκι? *Let us know in Greek! 

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 04:16 AM
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Γεια Στίβεν,


Χαχα! Ε μα ναι! Στα ελληνικά λέμε «αψού» όταν φταρνιζόμαστε και μετά «γείτσες»... τώρα θυμήθηκα αυτή εδώ τη σκηνή από τον αξέχαστο Κώστα Βουτσά:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-5-sqRbIWg


Χαίρομαι που σου άρεσε το μάθημα 😄


Γεια χαρά,


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Stephen
Wednesday at 03:20 AM
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Έχεις δίκιο Στεφανία! ‘Καϊμακιού’ sounds like what you’d get if you sneezed before the κ!


Μου αρέσει πολύ αυτό το μάθημα! Έμαθα πολλές λέξεις που μπορώ να χρησιμοποιήσω να μιλήσω ακόμα καλύτερα. Ένα ακόμη μάθημα και τελείωσα!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Friday at 07:26 AM
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Hi Ontran,


It seems you liked this lesson!


Let us know if you have any questions.


Cheers,

Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Ontran Le Phan
Thursday at 11:47 PM
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😄😄😄😄😄😄

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:17 AM
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Γεια σου Κάτι!


Στα ελληνικά λέμε επίσης: σκύλος που γαβγίζει δεν δαγκώνει?

Not a good advice for children, like you said!


Glad you enjoyed Εύβοια! Where are you off to next? :)


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Κατι
Wednesday at 02:20 AM
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Haha :)

"Haukkuva koira ei pure." Indeed!

(Actually, that is not true literally, and not a good advice for children :)

So, this saying is Finnish and means, "A barking dog won't bite." In use, it means that someone with big words does not actually have the guts to act on it. - "His bark is worse than his bite."

Or, it can mean that you don't need to be scared of something just because it looks scary. Like Greek grammar...


It was lovely on Evia!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:47 AM
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Hey Kati,


I didn't know you are from Finland.

As you have understood until now, Greek language has many difficulties. Haukkuva koira ei pure. ?? However, you have proved that if you try you can learn it easily.


Keep up the good work.

We are hear to help you.


All the best,

Nektarios

Team GreekPod101.com

Κατι
Monday at 07:03 PM
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Ναι, είναι λίγο δύσκολο, επειδή δεν έχουμε άρθρα στην γλώσσα μου, Φινλανδικά.

Yes, it's a bit difficult, because in my language, Finnish, we don't have articles.


Ευχαριστώ!

Kati

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 08:34 AM
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Γεια σου Κάτι,


παγωτό is a countable noun in Greek (παγωτό, παγωτά). Whether you'll use a definite article or not depends on the context and use. For example:


Μου αρέσει το παγωτό (defining what kind of food I like to eat). Τρώω πολλά παγωτά. (not defining, talking in general)


I know that sometimes it's not easy to tell the fine line between when to define (use the articles) and when not, but it's something that takes practice.


Keep up the good work :)


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Κατι
Sunday at 11:21 PM
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Yes, I understood your explanations! Thank you very much! It is important to know the difference between γιατί and επειδή.


The reason I thought παγωτό doesn't need article is because it's not "one" ice cream but like water, it is fluid(-ish). Would you also say: "σου αρέσει _το_ νερό;"?