Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Jenny: Hello everyone and welcome back to GreekPod101.com. This is Intermediate, Season 1, lesson 22, Making a Delicious Greek Walnut Pie. I’m Jenny.
Stefania: And I’m Stefania.
Jenny: In this lesson we’ll focus on pronouns, and specifically on interrogative and indefinite pronouns.
Stefania: This monologue takes place at the house where Erato and Natalia live.
Jenny: It is just Erató who's thinking out loud, so she’ll be using informal Greek. Let's listen to the monologue!
DIALOGUE
Ερατώ: Λοιπόν, καρυδόπιτα πολίτικη... χρόνος παρασκευής 25 λεπτά. Καλά, εγώ θα χρειαστώ καμιά ώρα, σίγουρα!
Ερατώ: Κατ' αρχάς πρέπει να βρω κάποιο βαθύ μπολ. Όλο και μερικά θα έχει κάπου η μάνα μου.
(ψάχνει)
Ερατώ: Ποιος τα 'χει κάνει όλα άνω κάτω εδώ; Τέλος πάντων. Συστατικά: Μία κούπα ζάχαρη, μία κούπα γάλα, μισή κούπα βούτυρο, δύο κούπες καρύδια χοντροκοπανισμένα... Πόσες; Δύο;
Ερατώ: Για να δω... Χμμ... έχουν μείνει κάμποσα καρύδια στη σακούλα. Νομίζω ότι θα φτάσουν.
Ερατώ: Ελπίζω να βγει κάτι καλό σήμερα. Τα φαγητά μου βγαίνουν καλά, τα γλυκά μου όμως ξεραίνονται συνήθως...
Ερατώ: Λοιπόν, Ερατώ, σήμερα θα κάνεις ακριβώς ό,τι λέει η συνταγή. Δεν θα αφήσω εγώ τον τάδε και τον δείνα να λέει πως κάθε γλυκό που φτιάχνω είναι χάλια!
(...)
Ερατώ: Λοιπόν, τα ανακατέψαμε όλα μαζί. Τι άλλο μας έμεινε; Τίποτε άλλο. Ώρα για ψήσιμο!
Jenny: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Ερατώ: Λοιπόν, καρυδόπιτα πολίτικη... χρόνος παρασκευής 25 λεπτά. Καλά, εγώ θα χρειαστώ καμιά ώρα, σίγουρα!
Ερατώ: Κατ' αρχάς πρέπει να βρω κάποιο βαθύ μπολ. Όλο και μερικά θα έχει κάπου η μάνα μου.
(ψάχνει)
Ερατώ: Ποιος τα 'χει κάνει όλα άνω κάτω εδώ; Τέλος πάντων. Συστατικά
Ερατώ: Για να δω... Χμμ... έχουν μείνει κάμποσα καρύδια στη σακούλα. Νομίζω ότι θα φτάσουν.
Ερατώ: Ελπίζω να βγει κάτι καλό σήμερα. Τα φαγητά μου βγαίνουν καλά, τα γλυκά μου όμως ξεραίνονται συνήθως...
Ερατώ: Λοιπόν, Ερατώ, σήμερα θα κάνεις ακριβώς ό,τι λέει η συνταγή. Δεν θα αφήσω εγώ τον τάδε και τον δείνα να λέει πως κάθε γλυκό που φτιάχνω είναι χάλια!
(...)
Ερατώ: Λοιπόν, τα ανακατέψαμε όλα μαζί. Τι άλλο μας έμεινε; Τίποτε άλλο. Ώρα για ψήσιμο!
Jenny: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Ερατώ: Λοιπόν, καρυδόπιτα πολίτικη... χρόνος παρασκευής 25 λεπτά. Καλά, εγώ θα χρειαστώ καμιά ώρα, σίγουρα!
Jenny: So, "polítiki" walnut pie... preparation time 25 minutes. Well I’ll need about an hour for sure!
Ερατώ: Κατ' αρχάς πρέπει να βρω κάποιο βαθύ μπολ. Όλο και μερικά θα έχει κάπου η μάνα μου.
Jenny: First I need to find a deep bowl. My mom will have one somewhere.
(ψάχνει)
Jenny(searching)
Ερατώ: Ποιος τα 'χει κάνει όλα άνω κάτω εδώ; Τέλος πάντων. Συστατικά
Jenny: Who made this mess here? Anyway. The ingredients are…One cup of sugar, one cup of milk, half a cup butter, two cups of slightly chopped walnuts... How many, two?
Ερατώ: Για να δω... Χμμ... έχουν μείνει κάμποσα καρύδια στη σακούλα. Νομίζω ότι θα φτάσουν.
Jenny: Let me see... Hmm... there's quite a few walnuts left in the bag. I think they’ll be enough.
Ερατώ: Ελπίζω να βγει κάτι καλό σήμερα. Τα φαγητά μου βγαίνουν καλά, τα γλυκά μου όμως ξεραίνονται συνήθως...
Jenny: I hope something good will come out today. My food turns out well, but my sweets usually come out dry...
Ερατώ: Λοιπόν, Ερατώ, σήμερα θα κάνεις ακριβώς ό,τι λέει η συνταγή. Δεν θα αφήσω εγώ τον τάδε και τον δείνα να λέει πως κάθε γλυκό που φτιάχνω είναι χάλια!
Jenny: OK, Erato, today you will do exactly what the recipe says. I am not going to let people say that every sweet I make is bad!
(...)
Jenny(...)
Ερατώ: Λοιπόν, τα ανακατέψαμε όλα μαζί. Τι άλλο μας έμεινε; Τίποτε άλλο. Ώρα για ψήσιμο!
Jenny: So, we mixed everything together. What else is left? Nothing. Time to bake!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Stefania: I’d love to have some of that walnut pie right now!
Jenny: Yeah.. but I have a question. Why is it called polítiki?
Stefania: That's an adjective that refers to something that comes from Istanbul. So the recipe Erato was using is a recipe from politiki cuisine, the cuisine of Istanbul.
Jenny: Is Istanbul’s food popular in Greece?
Stefania: Definitely. You see, in the early 20th century an ethnic cleansing of Greeks took place in Turkey. So the Orthodox Greeks who arrived in Greece as refugees from Istanbul brought their food culture with them.
Jenny: How would you describe it?
Stefania: Hmm… very sophisticated, rich in oriental spices, cured meats, dairy products, stuffed and oily food.
Jenny: Sounds yummy!
Stefania: It’s so good! Listeners, make sure you try it if you have a chance.
Vocab list
Jenny: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Stefania: πολίτικος [natural native speed]
Jenny: from Istanbul (former Constantinople)
Stefania: πολίτικος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: πολίτικος [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: καρυδόπιτα [natural native speed]
Jenny: Greek walnut pie
Stefania: καρυδόπιτα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: καρυδόπιτα [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: μερικοί [natural native speed]
Jenny: some
Stefania: μερικοί [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: μερικοί [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: τέλος πάντων [natural native speed]
Jenny: anyway, anyhow, whatever, anyways (US)
Stefania: τέλος πάντων [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: τέλος πάντων [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: συστατικό [natural native speed]
Jenny: ingredient, part (of a whole)
Stefania: συστατικό [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: συστατικό [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: χοντροκοπανισμένος [natural native speed]
Jenny: slightly chopped, ground
Stefania: χοντροκοπανισμένος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: χοντροκοπανισμένος [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: κάμποσος [natural native speed]
Jenny: quite a few, lot, many
Stefania: κάμποσος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: κάμποσος [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: καρυδιά [natural native speed]
Jenny: walnut, Adam's apple, walnut tree
Stefania: καρυδιά [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: καρυδιά [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: δείνα [natural native speed]
Jenny: such and such, a way to refer to people or things vaguely
Stefania: δείνα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: δείνα [natural native speed]
: And Last:
Stefania: τάδε [natural native speed]
Jenny: such and such, a way to refer to people or things vaguely
Stefania: τάδε [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: τάδε [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Jenny: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What's first?
Stefania: First we have the indefinite pronouns μερικοί, -ές, -ά, meaning "some." As you can tell, these have only plural forms.
Jenny: You use these to refer to a limited but unknown number of people or things either as a noun...
Stefania: ...for example, μερικοί συμφώνησαν, "some agreed,"
Jenny: ...or as an adjective...
Stefania: …μερικά βιβλία, "some books." Careful though! Don't confuse it with the adjective μερικός, -ή, -ό meaning "partial." For example, μερική έκλειψη ηλίου means "partial solar eclipse."
Jenny: OK. What’s next?
Stefania: The noun "καρύδι", meaning "walnut", “walnut tree”, or "Adam's apple."
Jenny: So, What's so special about this noun?
Stefania: It is used in a few idiomatic phrases. For example, Αυτός ο τύπος είναι σκληρό καρύδι, "That guy is a tough nut."
Jenny: This can be used for a person who is tough at negotiations and does not compromise easily. Any other examples?
Stefania: A common one is Στο πάρτι μαζεύτηκε κάθε καρυδιάς καρύδι, literally meaning "In the party there were walnuts gathered from any type of walnut tree."
Jenny: But the true meaning is "Any type of person you could imagine was at the party."
Stefania: Exactly!
Jenny: There are a few more examples in our lesson notes, but now let's see our last words.
Stefania: They’re the indeclinable, indefinite pronouns δείνα and τάδε.
Jenny: You always use them as nouns or adjectives, with a definite article of any gender, but usually only in singular, in order to refer vaguely to a thing or a person whose name we don't know, or we don't want to mention.
Stefania: For example Μου έλεγε ότι ο τάδε έκανε αυτό, ο δείνα έκανε το άλλο…, "She was saying to me that this person did this, this person did that…".
Jenny: I see. Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Stefania: In this lesson, you’ll learn about interrogative and indefinite pronouns.
Jenny: We use interrogative pronouns in both direct and indirect questions. There are three types here.
Stefania: Type A is the indeclinable τι;, meaning “what?" For example Τι ώρα είναι;
Jenny: "What time is it?"
Stefania: Type B is ποιος; ποια; ποιο;, meaning "Who? Whose? Whom? Which? or What?". For example, Ποιοι έρχονται;.
Jenny: "Who's coming?"
Stefania: Don't confuse the neuter form ποιο with the quantitative adverb πιο, used in the comparative and superlative degree of adjectives. For example, Ποιο βιβλίο θέλεις; Αυτό, το πιο μικρό.
Jenny: "Which book do you want? This one, the smallest one." And last?
Stefania: Type C, πόσος; πόση; πόσο;, meaning "how, how much/many?" For example Πόσες γυναίκες υπάρχουν εδώ;
Jenny: "How many women are there here?" Next we have the indefinite pronouns. Those refer to a thing or a person whose name we don't know or we don't want to mention. There are 11 groups here.
Stefania: First we have the familiar ένας, μια (μία) and ένα, meaning "one".
Next κανένας (κανείς), καμιά (καμία) and κανένα.
Jenny: These are tricky because they have two meanings. They can mean "no one, nobody", when there's a negation in the sentence...
Stefania: … for example, Δεν το πήρε κανείς.
Jenny: ..."No one took it." Or they can mean "some, someone, somebody, anyone or anybody" when there's no negation.
Stefania: Είναι κανείς εκεί;, "Is anybody there?" Next we have κάποιος, κάποια, κάποιο, meaning "someone, some." For example, Κάποια μέρα θα φύγω.
Jenny: "Some day I'll leave."
Stefania: Next we have μερικοί, μερικές, μερικά, which we discussed in our vocabulary explanation, and the indeclinable κάτι and κατιτί, meaning "something, some." For example, Δώσε μου κατιτί.
Jenny: "Give me something."
Stefania: Next is the indeclinable τίποτε/τίποτα,
Jenny: meaning "nothing, anything, something, any."
Stefania: For example, "Πες μας τίποτα."
Jenny: "Tell us something." Next?
Stefania: Kαθένας, καθεμιά (καθεμία), καθένα and κάθε,
Jenny: meaning "every single one, each" and "every."
Stefania: For example, "Κάθε εβδομάδα."
Jenny: "Every week."
Stefania: Next is the indeclinable καθετί, meaning "any/every single thing." For example, Ακούω το καθετί που λες.
Jenny: "I'm listening to everything you say.". Here we can omit the article "toh."
Stefania: Next are δείνα and τάδε, which we discussed previously, and last is άλλος, άλλη, άλλο,
Jenny: They mean "other" or "another," but the meaning depends on context.
Stefania: For example, Το άλλο γάντι χάθηκε means "The other glove is lost" but Βάλε κι άλλο means "Add more."
Jenny: That was a lot! Listeners, make sure to check our lesson notes for more examples and declension details.

Outro

Jenny: Well that's all for this lesson everyone! Thank you for listening, and we’ll see you next time.
Stefania: Γεια χαρά!

9 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Hi Listeners! Have you ever tried a Greek walnut pie?

GreekPod101.com
Tuesday at 01:25 PM
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Hi Dirk,


You are very welcome!


Cheers,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Dirk Janssens
Tuesday at 02:09 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Stefania,


Thank you for the clear explanation!

Kind regards,


Dirk

GreekPod101.com
Monday at 02:06 PM
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Hi Dirk,


Nice question!


Χοντρός indeed means "fat" but in that particular word, it refers to the bits that we chop (big fat bits) rather than the manner that we chop which is "light" in English. Κοπανισμένος is a participle meaning "(to be) pounded" (from the verb κοπανάω = "to hit/pound/slam").


So χοντροκοπανισμένος = something that has been pounded in a way that it is turned into fat pieces (pounded just a little = slightly chopped).


I hope this makes this word clearer :)


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Dirk Janssens
Saturday at 07:48 PM
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Hello,


I wonder if the translation of the word “χοντροκοπανισμένος” as “slightly chopped” (in the dialogue and in the vocabulary) is correct, since the word “χοντρός” means “fat”.


Kind regards,


Dirk

GreekPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 11:04 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Jeff,


Good questions! The thing with the indefinite pronoun κάποιος is that it tends to be slightly less indefinite than the indefinite pronoun κανένας. For example, in some contexts, you could put after κάποιος the adjective συγκεκριμένος meaning "specific" and say:


Αν έχεις κάποιο συγκεκριμένο πρόβλημα, ρώτησέ με.

If you have any specific problem, ask me.


But with κανένας, when used in the sense of "some", it doesn't sound right to add that adjective after it. it's just too indefinite. So, since the context here is also very indefinite (an indefinite day/child, not any specific day/child) it's better to use that one here.


I hope this clears up things a little bit!


Regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Jeff
Saturday at 09:56 AM
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Why is it

Πέρασε από το σπίτι καμιά μέρα

and not

Πέρασε από το σπίτι κάποια μέρα ?


And

Αν δεις κανένα παιδί, ρώτησέ το.

instead of

Αν δεις κάποιο παιδί, ρώτησέ το?

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:12 AM
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Γεια σου Κάτι,


There's no exact translation but it's a way of expressing the concept of "some/a few". The character is looking for a bowl so it has been translated as "one" in the dialogue.


Cheers,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Κατι
Tuesday at 11:37 PM
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Γεια σου!

What is the translation for the phrase: "Όλο και μερικά"?

It is on the second line of dialogue.


- Kati