Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Jenny: Hello everyone and welcome back to GreekPod101.com. This is Intermediate, Season 1, lesson 19, Charming Your Way Into a Bargain in Greece. I’m Jenny.
Stefania: And I’m Stefania.
Jenny: In this lesson, you’ll learn about pronouns, especially personal and possessive pronouns.
Stefania: The conversation takes place at a food souvenir store in Santorini. It's between Erato, Natalia and Sakis.
Jenny: The characters are good friends, so they’ll be using informal Greek.
Stefania: OK, let's listen to the conversation!
DIALOGUE
Ερατώ: Καλέ, πώς θα τα κουβαλήσουμε τόσα κρασιά πίσω στο ξενοδοχείο;
Ναταλία: Έννοια σου. Τον Σάκη τι τον έχουμε, κοτζάμ άντρα;
Σάκης: Δεν κατάλαβα. Τι είμαι εγώ, γαϊδούρι σαν απ' αυτά που έχουν εδώ στη Σαντορίνη;
Ναταλία: Βρε κοπλιμέντο σου έκανα. Ότι είσαι δυνατός ήθελα να πω...
Σάκης: Καλά, άσ' τα αυτά τώρα και φέρτε μου εδώ και τα δικά σας μπουκάλια να πάμε να πληρώσουμε.
Ερατώ: Ορίστε. Λοιπόν αυτά μαζί με το βιβλίο μαγειρικής που πήρα βγαίνουν στα 67 ευρώ. Πόσο βγαίνουν τα δικά σου;
Σάκης: Εμένα τα πράγματά μου όλα είναι στα 46 ευρώ.
Ερατώ: 67 και 46... Έξι και τέσσερα δέκα, εφτά και έξι δεκατρία, άρα σύνολο 113 ευρώ. Θα της πω της κοπέλας εδώ αν μπορεί να μας τα αφήσει όλα 100 ευρώ.
Σάκης: Θέλεις να της πω εγώ, που μπορώ να της κάνω και τα γλυκά μάτια;
Ναταλία: Αα, πουλάκι μου... ξύπνησε ο Kαζανόβας μέσα σου, ε; Εμπρός λοιπόν... για να σε δούμε εν δράσει!
Jenny: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Ερατώ: Καλέ, πώς θα τα κουβαλήσουμε τόσα κρασιά πίσω στο ξενοδοχείο;
Ναταλία: Έννοια σου. Τον Σάκη τι τον έχουμε, κοτζάμ άντρα;
Σάκης: Δεν κατάλαβα. Τι είμαι εγώ, γαϊδούρι σαν απ' αυτά που έχουν εδώ στη Σαντορίνη;
Ναταλία: Βρε κοπλιμέντο σου έκανα. Ότι είσαι δυνατός ήθελα να πω...
Σάκης: Καλά, άσ' τα αυτά τώρα και φέρτε μου εδώ και τα δικά σας μπουκάλια να πάμε να πληρώσουμε.
Ερατώ: Ορίστε. Λοιπόν αυτά μαζί με το βιβλίο μαγειρικής που πήρα βγαίνουν στα 67 ευρώ. Πόσο βγαίνουν τα δικά σου;
Σάκης: Εμένα τα πράγματά μου όλα είναι στα 46 ευρώ.
Ερατώ: 67 και 46... Έξι και τέσσερα δέκα, εφτά και έξι δεκατρία, άρα σύνολο 113 ευρώ. Θα της πω της κοπέλας εδώ αν μπορεί να μας τα αφήσει όλα 100 ευρώ.
Σάκης: Θέλεις να της πω εγώ, που μπορώ να της κάνω και τα γλυκά μάτια;
Ναταλία: Αα, πουλάκι μου... ξύπνησε ο Kαζανόβας μέσα σου, ε; Εμπρός λοιπόν... για να σε δούμε εν δράσει!
Jenny: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Ερατώ: Καλέ, πώς θα τα κουβαλήσουμε τόσα κρασιά πίσω στο ξενοδοχείο;
Jenny: Hey, how on earth are we going to carry all those wine bottles back to the hotel?
Ναταλία: Έννοια σου. Τον Σάκη τι τον έχουμε, κοτζάμ άντρα;
Jenny: Worry not! What else do we have our man Saki here for?
Σάκης: Δεν κατάλαβα. Τι είμαι εγώ, γαϊδούρι σαν απ' αυτά που έχουν εδώ στη Σαντορίνη;
Jenny: Uh… what? What am I, a donkey like the ones they have here in Santorini?
Ναταλία: Βρε κοπλιμέντο σου έκανα. Ότι είσαι δυνατός ήθελα να πω...
Jenny: Come on, it was a compliment. What I meant to say is that you’re strong...
Σάκης: Καλά, άσ' τα αυτά τώρα και φέρτε μου εδώ και τα δικά σας μπουκάλια να πάμε να πληρώσουμε.
Jenny: Yeah, right. Just give me your bottles too, so we can go and pay.
Ερατώ: Ορίστε. Λοιπόν αυτά μαζί με το βιβλίο μαγειρικής που πήρα βγαίνουν στα 67 ευρώ. Πόσο βγαίνουν τα δικά σου;
Jenny: Here you go. So, this stuff and the cookbook I got cost 67 euros. How much is your stuff?
Σάκης: Εμένα τα πράγματά μου όλα είναι στα 46 ευρώ.
Jenny: All together it costs 46 euros.
Ερατώ: 67 και 46... Έξι και τέσσερα δέκα, εφτά και έξι δεκατρία, άρα σύνολο 113 ευρώ. Θα της πω της κοπέλας εδώ αν μπορεί να μας τα αφήσει όλα 100 ευρώ.
Jenny: 67 and 46... Six plus four equals ten, seven plus six equals thirteen, so total 113 euros. I’ll ask the girl here if she can give us everything for 100 euros.
Σάκης: Θέλεις να της πω εγώ, που μπορώ να της κάνω και τα γλυκά μάτια;
Jenny: Do you want me to ask her? I can turn on my charm.
Ναταλία: Αα, πουλάκι μου... ξύπνησε ο Kαζανόβας μέσα σου, ε; Εμπρός λοιπόν... για να σε δούμε εν δράσει!
Jenny: Well, well... the Casanova in you woke up, huh? Go ahead then, so we can see you in action!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Jenny: Bargaining with flirting, huh?
Stefania: Well, you know… whatever it takes to save some money!
Jenny: Do you have any other tips for successful bargaining in Greece?
Stefania: Sure. First of all, be friendly, nice and polite, and say "Γεια σας!" while smiling when you enter a shop. Then you can ask whether there's a similar but cheaper item to the one you’re interested in.
Jenny: That sounds nice and discreet, because they'll get the point and either offer you a better price or show you something cheaper.
Stefania: Or when you want to buy many things, you can ask beforehand whether they could lower or round the price for you. Just don't pretend to walk away after hearing a price, waiting for them to call you back and negotiate.
Jenny: I guess it might not work and you’ll be out of luck! That was useful! Okay, now let’s move on to the vocab.
Vocab list
Jenny: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Stefania: κουβαλάω [natural native speed]
Jenny: to carry
Stefania: κουβαλάω [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: κουβαλάω [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: τόσος [natural native speed]
Jenny: such, all this/that, that much/big, that many (when in plural)
Stefania: τόσος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: τόσος [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: κοτζάμ [natural native speed]
Jenny: big, large, of great importance
Stefania: κοτζάμ [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: κοτζάμ [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: γαϊδούρι [natural native speed]
Jenny: donkey
Stefania: γαϊδούρι [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: γαϊδούρι [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: κοπλιμέντο [natural native speed]
Jenny: compliment
Stefania: κοπλιμέντο [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: κοπλιμέντο [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: άσ' τα αυτά [natural native speed]
Jenny: yeah right, drop it, stop the talk
Stefania: άσ' τα αυτά [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: άσ' τα αυτά [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: σύνολο [natural native speed]
Jenny: total, set (matching outfit), whole, ensemble, sum
Stefania: σύνολο [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: σύνολο [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: κάνω τα γλυκά μάτια [natural native speed]
Jenny: to give someone the eye, to ogle, to flirt
Stefania: κάνω τα γλυκά μάτια [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: κάνω τα γλυκά μάτια [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: πουλάκι μου [natural native speed]
Jenny: well well, dear
Stefania: πουλάκι μου [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: πουλάκι μου [natural native speed]
: And Last:
Stefania: εν δράσει [natural native speed]
Jenny: in action, in the act
Stefania: εν δράσει [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: εν δράσει [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Jenny: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What's first?
Stefania: First we have the indeclinable adjective κοτζάμ or κοτζαμάν, which comes from the Turkish word kocaman meaning "huge."
Jenny: In Greek it’s always placed in front of the noun it defines, giving the notion of great volume, size, or importance. It can’t stand alone like other adjectives do.
Stefania: For example, you can say Είναι όμορφος!, "He is beautiful!", but not Είναι κοτζάμ.
Jenny: That just means “He is a big...” and that will make people think “a big what?” This word is also used to contrast the size or importance of someone or something, with a specific action or situation.
Stefania: For example, Kοτζαμάν μαντράχαλος και δεν πάει να δουλέψει,
Jenny: which means "He is a hulking grown up man, and he doesn't go to work." OK. Next?
Stefania: Κάνω τα γλυκά μάτια is an expression that means "to give someone the eye," "to ogle," or "to flirt." It can be used just like the expression κάνω γλύκες, literally meaning "I do sweetnesses."
Jenny: The latter can be also used when you’re trying to persuade someone by using flattery. For example...
Stefania: Σταμάτα να μου κάνεις γλύκες και απλά πες μου τι θες.
Jenny: "Stop buttering me up and just tell me what you want."
Stefania: Last we have the expression πουλάκι μου.
Jenny: Literally it means "my little birdie," but when it’s used to address someone it can express irony, like when we discover that someone did, is doing, or will do something bad or unexpected. It can be used affectionately too.
Stefania: In the first case we sometimes add "α" in front of it, and use a descending tone of voice. Αα, πουλάκι μου…, meaning "Well, well…".
Jenny: When you’re expressing affection, usually when you’re talking to children or people much younger than you, it doesn't need to go at the beginning of the sentence.
Stefania: For example, Έλα εδώ πουλάκι μου, ποιος σε πείραξε;
Jenny: Meaning "Come here dear, who teased you?" Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Stefania: In this lesson, you’ll learn about personal and possessive pronouns.
Jenny: It's a back-to-basics lesson, but with this and the next lessons we’ll fully cover the topic of pronouns. First of all, a pronoun is a word that we use in place of a name, a noun or an adjective.
Stefania: In Greek there are 8 different pronoun groups.
Jenny: They are Personal, Possessive, Reflexive, Definite, Demonstrative, Relative, Interrogative, and Indefinite. Let's start with the personal pronouns. They denote the 1st, 2nd or 3rd person. They’re split into emphatic or strong forms when we want to put emphasis on something or someone, and into clitic or weak forms when we aren’t emphasizing anything.
Stefania: The strong forms εγώ and εσύ are like the English "I," and "you," and the weak forms τον and την are like "him" and "her," and are actually used more often.
Jenny: You can review their declension in the useful tables in our lesson notes, and you should keep those notes out while you’re listening to us. Now let’s talk about their spelling...
Stefania: The forms that start with ε might lose that initial ε if the previous word ends with an α, ο, ω, or an accented έ. For example, Από μένα για σας instead of Από εμένα για εσάς, meaning "From me to you."
Jenny: However, when you have two "eh" sounds meeting, you can replace the first one with an apostrophe.
Stefania: For example, ούτ’ εγώ instead of ούτε εγώ, meaning "me neither." Sometimes the word και meaning "and" or "also" becomes "κι" in front of personal pronouns starting with "ε."
Jenny: These spelling changes are very common in both literature and colloquial speech. Sometimes the monosyllabic weak forms might also need an accent mark. Check out when that happens in the lesson notes. Now let’s move on to our next group, the possessive nouns.
Stefania: Those denote to whom something belongs, so, the owner. There are two subgroups.
Jenny: The first one is actually the non-accented genitive case weak forms of the personal pronouns. It's just their meaning that changes here, so they're easy to remember.
Stefania: The 2nd group, called the emphatic possessive pronouns, uses the same weak forms as the first, but with the adjective δικός, -ή, -ό in front of them. These emphasize the owner more. It's like saying "mine" instead of "my." For example, το βιβλίο είναι δικό μου.
Jenny: Which means "the book is mine."

Outro

Jenny: Well, that's all for this lesson everyone! Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time.
Stefania: Γεια χαρά!

6 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Hi Listeners! Let's practice the Greek Pronouns here!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:49 AM
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Hi Toni,


“I will give him his phone” = Θα του δώσω το τηλέφωνο του. (Εγώ and other personal pronouns as subjects are optional because the verb shows us the person. So we don't use them most of the times. Here it wouldn't sound natural.)


You are correct:

“το τηλέφωνο” is the direct object in accusative.


“του (δώσω)” is the indirect object in genitive. it is a personal pronoun, not an article because it means "him."


The last “του” (meaning "his") is the personal pronoun in genitive which completes the meaning of the noun τηλέφωνο as a nominal determiner (ονοματικός προσδιορισμός - onomatikós prosdiorismós) expressing "ownership." The corresponding grammar bank about the genitive case mentions the following:


When a noun in the genitive case defines a different noun or an adjective that is not in the genitive case, then the noun in genitive is called γενική προσδιοριστική (yenikí prozdioristikí) in Greek, meaning "determiner in genitive." Such a determiner might denote a lot of things:


1. Ownership: Possessive genitive (γενική του κτήτορα - yenikí tu ktítora)

Πήγα στο σπίτι της Θωμαής.

Píga sto spíti this Thomaís.

"I went to the house of Thomais." (the house belongs to Thomais)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


I hope it's clearer now.


Regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Toni
Tuesday at 06:32 AM
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Hello,

I have a small grammar question =)

I hope you can help me. I'm trying to distinguish between the direct and indirect objects and it gets a bit confusing with the pronouns =P

As an example. If I want to say "I will give him his phone". How would I say that in greek?

I'm thinking: "Εγώ θα του δώσω το τηλέφωνο του". But I am not sure this is correct.

I'm thinking that "το τηλέφωνο" is the direct object in accusative. That "του (δώσω)" is the indirect object in genitive and the last "του" is the personal pronoun in genitive also. But I'm not sure if perhaps "του (δώσω)" also should count as a personal pronoun or if it's just the definite article in genitive form? I'm confused. Hope you can help me out =)

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:46 PM
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Hi Kati!


The τι in such a sentence structure and context means "what for" as in "for what reason/purpose something is the way it is or is there for". Such a question requires no answer (rhetorical).


Saying "Τον Σάκη γιατί τον έχουμε;" makes think of it more like "WHY do we have Sakis here for?" Is he useful?" a question requiring an answer. "We have him here because...."


Here are some ways you can use τι in a sentence:

https://screencast.com/t/PerxeeYFABYx


Regards,

Stefania

Κατι
Monday at 08:55 PM
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Now I found a similar structure in the vocabulary expansion:

Tόσο μεγάλο σπίτι τι το χρειάζεσαι;

Κατι
Monday at 08:52 PM
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Hi Stefania!

A nice lesson, but the dialogue was not easy to understand!

I have a question: On line two, it says: "Τον Σάκη τι τον έχουμε"

It is translated: "What else do we have our man Saki here for?" I would translate it "Τον Σάκη γιατί τον έχουμε;" or something along those lines...

So is the original sentence a phrase of some kind?


Thanks,

Kati