Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Jenny: Hello everyone and welcome back to GreekPod101.com. This is Intermediate, Season 1, lesson 18, How Many Glasses of Greek Wine Have You Had? I’m Jenny.
Stefania: And I’m Stefania.
Jenny: In this lesson, you’ll learn about numeral nouns as well as other general details of numerals and numbers.
Stefania: This conversation takes place at a traditional taverna in Santorini. It's between Erato, Natalia, and Sakis.
Jenny: The characters are good friends, so they’ll be using informal Greek.
Stefania: OK, let's listen to the conversation!
DIALOGUE
Όλοι μαζί: Γεια μας! (ποτήρια τσουγκρίζουν)
Ερατώ: Αχ, σε καλό να μας βγει βρε παιδιά! Ποπό, έχω να ρίξω τόσο γέλιο εδώ και πολύ καιρό!
Σάκης: Όπα παιδιά, με το μαλακό το κρασί! Έχουμε πιει καμιά δεκαριά ποτήρια μέχρι τώρα.
Ερατώ: Σιγά τα ποτήρια! Μικρά ποτηράκια είναι, δεν βλέπεις;
Ναταλία: Πάντως είναι εξαιρετικό το κρασί που πήραμε παιδιά. Πριν φύγουμε να πάρουμε μερικά μπουκάλια όλοι μαζί να έχουμε, τώρα που θα πάμε πίσω.
Σάκης: Ίσως αν πάρουμε καμιά εξάδα όλοι μαζί, να μας κάνουν και καλύτερη τιμή. Ε, τι λέτε;
Ναταλία: Αυτή που είναι καλή στα παζάρια είναι η Ερατώ. Άμα θες να πας για σουβενίρ, να την πάρεις μαζί σου!
Σάκης: Τελικά πότε θα πάμε για σουβενίρ βρε κορίτσια;
Ερατώ: Ααα, μη με ρωτάς τέτοια. Ειλικρινά, δεν μπορώ να σκεφτώ αυτή τη στιγμή! Να σας πω καλύτερα μια μαντινάδα να γελάσουμε;
Ναταλία: Α, καλά... πάει αυτή! Τη χάσαμε!
Jenny: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Όλοι μαζί: Γεια μας! (ποτήρια τσουγκρίζουν)
Ερατώ: Αχ, σε καλό να μας βγει βρε παιδιά! Ποπό, έχω να ρίξω τόσο γέλιο εδώ και πολύ καιρό!
Σάκης: Όπα παιδιά, με το μαλακό το κρασί! Έχουμε πιει καμιά δεκαριά ποτήρια μέχρι τώρα.
Ερατώ: Σιγά τα ποτήρια! Μικρά ποτηράκια είναι, δεν βλέπεις;
Ναταλία: Πάντως είναι εξαιρετικό το κρασί που πήραμε παιδιά. Πριν φύγουμε να πάρουμε μερικά μπουκάλια όλοι μαζί να έχουμε, τώρα που θα πάμε πίσω.
Σάκης: Ίσως αν πάρουμε καμιά εξάδα όλοι μαζί, να μας κάνουν και καλύτερη τιμή. Ε, τι λέτε;
Ναταλία: Αυτή που είναι καλή στα παζάρια είναι η Ερατώ. Άμα θες να πας για σουβενίρ, να την πάρεις μαζί σου!
Σάκης: Τελικά πότε θα πάμε για σουβενίρ βρε κορίτσια;
Ερατώ: Ααα, μη με ρωτάς τέτοια. Ειλικρινά, δεν μπορώ να σκεφτώ αυτή τη στιγμή! Να σας πω καλύτερα μια μαντινάδα να γελάσουμε;
Ναταλία: Α, καλά... πάει αυτή! Τη χάσαμε!
:
Jenny: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Όλοι μαζί: Γεια μας! (ποτήρια τσουγκρίζουν)
Jenny: Cheers! (glasses clink)
Ερατώ: Αχ, σε καλό να μας βγει βρε παιδιά! Ποπό, έχω να ρίξω τόσο γέλιο εδώ και πολύ καιρό!
Jenny: Ah, may this lead us to good you guys! Oh my, I haven't laughed so much in a long time!
Σάκης: Όπα παιδιά, με το μαλακό το κρασί! Έχουμε πιει καμιά δεκαριά ποτήρια μέχρι τώρα.
Jenny: Whoa guys, take it easy on the wine! We’ve drunk over ten glasses so far.
Ερατώ: Σιγά τα ποτήρια! Μικρά ποτηράκια είναι, δεν βλέπεις;
Jenny: You call those glasses? Those are little glasses, can't you see?
Ναταλία: Πάντως είναι εξαιρετικό το κρασί που πήραμε παιδιά. Πριν φύγουμε να πάρουμε μερικά μπουκάλια όλοι μαζί να έχουμε, τώρα που θα πάμε πίσω.
Jenny: Still, guys, the wine that we got is excellent. Before we leave we should all buy a few bottles and have them as a stock, now that we’re going back.
Σάκης: Ίσως αν πάρουμε καμιά εξάδα όλοι μαζί, να μας κάνουν και καλύτερη τιμή. Ε, τι λέτε;
Jenny: Maybe if we buy a pack of six they could give us a better price. So, what do you say?
Ναταλία: Αυτή που είναι καλή στα παζάρια είναι η Ερατώ. Άμα θες να πας για σουβενίρ, να την πάρεις μαζί σου!
Jenny: Erato is the one who's good at bargaining. If you want to go for souvenirs, take her with you!
Σάκης: Τελικά πότε θα πάμε για σουβενίρ βρε κορίτσια;
Jenny: So girls, when are we going to get around to souvenir shopping?
Ερατώ: Ααα, μη με ρωτάς τέτοια. Ειλικρινά, δεν μπορώ να σκεφτώ αυτή τη στιγμή! Να σας πω καλύτερα μια μαντινάδα να γελάσουμε;
Jenny: Oh, don't ask me stuff like that. Honestly, I can't think right now! Can I tell you guys a Cretan "mantinada" instead and make us all laugh?
Ναταλία: Α, καλά... πάει αυτή! Τη χάσαμε!
Jenny: Oh, well... there she goes! We lost her!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Jenny: Well, our characters sound very cheerful!
Stefania: After a few glasses of that Santorini wine, who wouldn't be?
Jenny: Is Santorini a wine area in Greece?
Stefania: Yes. The grapes cultivated there are native and they have a very special mineral-like taste because of the volcanic soil, at least in my experience.
Jenny: I hear that even though not a lot of wine is produced there, experts consider its quality to be first-rate. Are there any wines you would recommend, Stefania?
Stefania: The most popular wines come from white grapes like Assyrtiko, Athiri and Aidani. A mix of those three can result in Nykteri or Vinsanto, a dessert wine. I always suggest that visitors to Santorini who love wine should try a wine tasting in one of the local vineyards.
Jenny: That’s a great tip, listeners! Okay, now let’s move on to the vocab.
Vocab list
Jenny: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Stefania: Γεια μας! [natural native speed]
Jenny: Cheers!
Stefania: Γεια μας! [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: Γεια μας! [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: σε καλό να μας βγει [natural native speed]
Jenny: may this lead us to good
Stefania: σε καλό να μας βγει [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: σε καλό να μας βγει [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: με το μαλακό [natural native speed]
Jenny: easy on the…, take it easy, gently
Stefania: με το μαλακό [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: με το μαλακό [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: καμιά δεκαριά [natural native speed]
Jenny: over ten, about ten
Stefania: καμιά δεκαριά [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: καμιά δεκαριά [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: σιγά [natural native speed]
Jenny: slowly/gently/noiselessly
Stefania: σιγά [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: σιγά [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: να έχουμε [natural native speed]
Jenny: to have as a stock, for our stock
Stefania: να έχουμε [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: να έχουμε [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: εξάδα [natural native speed]
Jenny: pack of six
Stefania: εξάδα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: εξάδα [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: παζάρι [natural native speed]
Jenny: bargaining, flea market, marketplace, souk (Middle Eastern marketplace)
Stefania: παζάρι [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: παζάρι [natural native speed]
: Next:
Stefania: τέτοιος [natural native speed]
Jenny: such, like that
Stefania: τέτοιος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: τέτοιος [natural native speed]
: And Last:
Stefania: μαντινάδα [natural native speed]
Jenny: mantinada, a traditional rhyming couplet, popular in Crete
Stefania: μαντινάδα [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Stefania: μαντινάδα [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Jenny: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What do we have first?
Stefania: First is the expression "σε καλό να μας βγει."
Jenny: Which literally means "may this lead us to good."
Stefania: It's something we say when there is excessive or even unreasonable cheerfulness.
Jenny: For example, after a very funny or extremely happy situation that makes everyone laugh their heads off. So at exactly which point do you say this?
Stefania: We say this when the laughs and excitement start to slowly calm down, in order to prevent something bad from happening.
Jenny: Is it because of some superstition?
Stefania: No, not really. It's more of a logical thing to say since whatever goes up comes right back down!
Jenny: Ah, that makes sense.
Stefania: Next we have the adverb "σιγά."
Jenny: It means "not strongly" in terms of force,
sound volume, speed, or other things like that. So it's like saying "slowly", "gently," or "quietly," right?
Stefania: Yes. But it can also be used in interjectional phrases.
Jenny: In those cases it expresses worry, discontent, disapproval, empathy or irony. Stefania, can you give us an example?
Stefania: The famous idiom "Σιγά τα λάχανα!" or "Σιγά τον πολυέλαιο!", meaning "big deal" in an ironic way.
Jenny: Listeners, check out the lesson notes for more examples. What's the last word?
Stefania: The neuter noun παζάρι, meaning "bargaining." "To bargain" is κάνω παζάρια. Παζάρι also refers to a market.
Jenny: I know it refers to markets where new and old things are sold, or to the Middle Eastern markets that are called souks, It’s very similar to a flea market. But can it also be used for a food market?
Stefania: No. For those we use the term αγορά. More specifically, we have λαχαναγορά,
Jenny: Which means "fruit and vegetable market,"
Stefania: ψαραγορά,
Jenny: Meaning "fish market,"
Stefania: and "κρεαταγορά,"
Jenny: Meaning "meat market." What about the Greek weekly local markets?
Stefania: They’re called λαϊκή αγορά, or simply λαϊκή.
Jenny: Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Stefania: In this lesson, you’ll learn about numeral nouns and other general details of numerals and numbers.
Jenny: Ιn the previous lesson we learned about the numeral adjectives, so now it's time to talk about the numeral nouns and close the chapter on "Greek numerals."
Stefania: Numeral nouns are called "collective numbers" in Greek, περιληπτικά αριθμητικά.
Jenny: They’re actually abstract nouns. They’re formed from the cardinal numbers by using two specific feminine endings.
Stefania: These endings are -αριά or -ριά and -άδα. The -αριά or -ριά -ending nouns express the concept of "approximately" and they are almost always accompanied by the word καμιά.
Jenny: Listeners, you’ll notice that that word doesn't get translated, and just emphasizes the concept of "approximately."
Stefania: An example from the dialogue is δεκαριά, meaning "over ten."
Jenny: We usually form these nouns from round numbers from 10-900, like 10, 15, 20, 25, 50, 200, 350, 400 etc. For numbers over 1000, we don't use this ending.
Stefania: Next we have the -άδα-ending nouns.
Jenny: These denote a number of units that form a group.
Stefania: For more than one group of units, we use the plural ending -άδες. An example from the dialogue is εξάδα meaning "set/group of six."
Jenny: And this concludes the categories of Greek numerals! To review all the Greek numeral categories, check the collective table in our lesson notes. Now it's time for something extra!
Stefania: Yes, let’s talk about the concept of "half." To say "half" we use the adjective μισός, -ή, -ό, which is not considered a numeral in Greek.
Jenny: In combination with cardinal numbers, we have two options. First is to make a phrase, for example “one and a half.”
Stefania: Ένας και μισός, μία και μισή or ένα και μισό, depending on the gender. The second option is to make a compound adjective, sometimes declinable, by using the suffix -ήμισι after a consonant or -μισι after a vowel, for example, τεσσερισήμισι and πεντέμισι.
Jenny: Those would be “four and a half” and “five and a half.” Here you need to be careful of the spelling and declension, so check out the lesson notes for more details. We also included some tips that will help you read basic mathematical symbols correctly, like the negative numbers, percentages, decimals, fractions, and more.
Stefania: After this lesson you'll be able to read and write numbers and numerals in Greek perfectly!
Jenny: Yup, so study those notes hard!

Outro

Jenny: Well, that's all for this lesson everyone! Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time.
Stefania: Γεια χαρά!

3 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Listeners! Have you ever tried Greek wine? *Did you like it? 

GreekPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 03:42 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Elias,


The first one sounds more correct because the sentence uses θα + past continuous tense which is a form of making a hypothesis in Greek (conditional form). So the speaker is only assuming how many people there were, (s)he is not sure. Rendering this in English, "There must have been.." sounds more correct.


Γεια χαρά,


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Elias
Saturday at 12:32 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi there,

Is this correct:

Θα ήταν καμιά εικοσαριά άνθρωποι. - "There must have been over twenty people."

or it should have been translated like this:

Θα ήταν καμιά εικοσαριά άνθρωποι. - "There would be over twenty people."