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Lesson Transcript

Hi everybody, this is Stefania! Welcome to Greekpod101.com’s Alfaveeto made easy.
The fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn the Greek alphabet: the alfaveeto!
This lesson is also a landmark: after you finish it, you will have covered more than half of this series and two thirds of the Greek alphabet! What do you think of Greek letters now? Do they seem as hard as they did when you started? You know quite a lot by now, so a few more won’t make a difference, will they? On one hand they won’t. But on the other, of course they will since you can’t really write Greek without them!
The first letter today is a consonant, “Nee” –yes, pronounced just like the knee on your leg. Its sound in Greek is “n”, and its shape will seem very familiar.
Notice something a little off? Let’s first look at the uppercase “Nee”.
It is handwritten like this:
Ν
And this is what the lowercase “Nee” looks like.
It is handwritten like this:
v
So what do we notice? The uppercase is identical to the English “n” but the lowercase looks exactly like a “v”. This might prove a bit tricky, but since “Nee” is such a common letter, you’ll get used to it in no time.
Let’s do it again- Here’s the uppercase form:
And here’s the lowercase form:
And now for something completely different from English. Even though we haven’t finished our lessons yet, here’s the last letter of the Greek alphabet. Have you heard its name before? It’s “Omega”. The sound it makes is “oh” -- yes, just like “Omikron”.
Here is an uppercase “Omega”.
It is handwritten like this, or this:
Ω (both ways)
And this is what the lowercase “Omega” looks like.
It is handwritten like this:
ω
As you can see there is a similarity between the uppercase “Omega” and “Omikron” when they’re handwritten, right?
Let’s do it again- Here’s the uppercase form:
And here’s the lowercase form:
Think of “Omega” as a big “Omikron” Actually, this is what its name means: Omega: “Big Oh”, while “Omikron” means “Small Oh”.
Now let’s see what new words we can make. So adding “Pee” and “Yota”, we get something we do every day, that is the verb “to drink”. In Greek this is “πίνω” and it’s written this way:
πίνω
There is something in this word which shows why “Omega” is one of the most important letters of the Greek language: it is the ending letter for the dictionary form of verbs; A good example is the verb, “έχω”, “to have”. Lets write it together:
Έχω
16 letters down, 8 to go! Not bad, huh? Let’s put them all together and see what we have! “Alpha”, “Mee”, “Taf”, “Yota”, “Kappa”, “Omikron”, “Pee”, “Sigma”, “Eeta”, “Psee”, “Gama”, “Epseelon”, “Ro”, “Hee”, “Nee” and “Omega”.
Now it's time for Stefania’s insights
In our first lesson, we started with the letter “Alfa” and in this lesson we learned “Omega” -these are the first and the last letters of the Greek alphabet.
In Greek, as in English, saying that something is “To Alfa kai to Omega” or “The Alfa and the Omega”, means that something is “very important”, that if you have this, you also have everything in between.
So, “The Alfa and the Omega of writing Greek is practice!” -it’s a cliche but it’s true!
Do you know what “Greece” is called in Greek? Many people might think it is, well, “Greece”. It isn’t and in the next lesson, we will learn how to write it!
See you in the next Alfaveeto made easy lesson!
Ya hara!

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:46 PM
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Hi Maral,


That's because πίνω is an active voice verb and as such, these verbs end in ω in the first person and never in ο. That's a grammar rule. I hope the lessons I've suggested in a previous similar comment of yours will help answer your questions regarding spelling rules.


All the best,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Maral
Wednesday at 03:09 AM
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οκ ... ηιατι πινω και οχι πινο ?

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 05:48 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Penelope,


Thank you for your question. It's good that you asked!

Both ways are OK. As you can see even the computer font has hee above the line, just like the other letters:

http://screencast.com/t/t2J23Rrks


When I was writing the example on the video I had no line, so it looked more neat, symmetrical and easier to write it that way. And that way is OK too.

Of course, when you are writing in a notebook, for example, where there's lines you can extend the legs of hee just like I marked here:

http://screencast.com/t/DaYSitGW


The shape of hee in a computer font varies a lot, but I'd say the most standard way is the way wikipedia has it. Hee is actually not perfectly symmetrical, although it looks like it, instead the lower part is slightly more elongated (http://screencast.com/t/8iQulZ6u4zX ), that's why it looks better if the legs go beyond the line. My tip is to keep the join point slightly above the line if you go for that version or just make it like I did it in the video which is easier. Choose whichever you like! There's flexibility here :smile:


Let me know if you have any other letter-related questions.


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Penelope
Saturday at 03:45 AM
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when you wrote the "hee" in "έχω ", why was the 'hee' all above the line and not half under? thank you.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 03:16 PM
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Hi Alexandra,


It depends on the word you are writing. There are no set rules concerning their use. However omega is used in the ending of the active voice, indicative mood verbs when in present tense and in first person singular (dictionary form).

Omikron is used in many masculine and neuter adjective endings. These are not the only cases though. You will learn the patterns as you learn more and more grammar. You shouldn't worry about this right now. Just focus on reading and writing :smile:


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Alexandra
Wednesday at 07:02 AM
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hi, I have a doubt, when do you use omega and when do you use omikron? or it just depends on the word you are writing? and is it the same with eeta and yota?

thanks!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 05:26 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Jared,


It seems like the problem is with the internet speed that you have on your iPod device. Did you try to watch the video on a computer with a high speed connection?


I watched the video, but I couldn't reproduce the issue you are describing. Perhaps hitting "play" and then "pause" until it loads will improve the playback quality.


I hope this helps!


Stefania,

Team GreekPod101.com

Jared
Tuesday at 12:00 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I am having video issues, it is egging choppy and will stay on the same screen for a long time any help would be appreciated. I have already tried restarting my iPod touch and reconnecting to the Internet... - Jared

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 11:35 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Roula,


I tried to playback the video, but unfortunately I couldn't recreate the problem.


Do you still have audio problems? If yes, I guess there must be something going on with your browser. If restarting the browser or even the computer does not work, please send an email at contactus@GreekPod101.com describing the problem in details. Our technical team should be able to guide you.


Thank you.


Kind regards,

Stefania,

Team GreekPod101.com

Roula
Thursday at 05:19 AM
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Hi, why this vedio is with no sound? All previous videos have sounds!

I checked all my system setting and all is in order... except this one.

Coukd you pls help?


Thanks in advance...


B.Rgds

Roula