Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Fay: Hello, and welcome back to GreekPod101.com – the fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn Greek. This is Beginner Season 1, Lesson 8 - Any Greek Calls? Thanks for joining us for this Beginner series. I’m Fay.
Chrissi: This is Chrissy.
Fay: What are we learning in this lesson?
Chrissi: We are looking at the cases of nouns, especially the genitive case.
Fay: The conversation takes place at Petra Gordon’s office in Athens.
Chrissi: It’s between the main character, Petra and the office secretary.
Fay: Since the characters are co-workers of different rank, the conversation is in polite language.
Chrissi: Let’s listen.

Lesson conversation

Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Πήρε κανείς τηλέφωνο την ώρα του φαγητού;
Γραμματέας: Πήραν από το γραφείο του πελάτη που είδατε το πρωί. Είναι για κάτι σχετικό με κάποια λεπτομέρεια της προσφοράς μας.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Άφησαν κάποιο τηλέφωνο;
Γραμματέας: Όχι, είπαν να καλέσετε στο τηλεφωνικό κέντρο της εταιρείας.
Fay: Now the slow version.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Πήρε κανείς τηλέφωνο την ώρα του φαγητού;
Γραμματέας: Πήραν από το γραφείο του πελάτη που είδατε το πρωί. Είναι για κάτι σχετικό με κάποια λεπτομέρεια της προσφοράς μας.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Άφησαν κάποιο τηλέφωνο;
Γραμματέας: Όχι, είπαν να καλέσετε στο τηλεφωνικό κέντρο της εταιρείας.
Fay: Now with the translation.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Πήρε κανείς τηλέφωνο την ώρα του φαγητού;
Fay: Did anyone call during lunch?
Γραμματέας: Πήραν από το γραφείο του πελάτη που είδατε το πρωί. Είναι για κάτι σχετικό με κάποια λεπτομέρεια της προσφοράς μας.
Fay: They called from this morning's client's office. It's about some detail from our offer.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Άφησαν κάποιο τηλέφωνο;
Fay: Did they leave a number?
Γραμματέας: Όχι, είπαν να καλέσετε στο τηλεφωνικό κέντρο της εταιρείας.
Fay: No, they said you should use the company's telephone center.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Fay: From the dialogue it seems Greeks take big lunch breaks. Is this true?
Chrissi: Well, we are exaggerating a little! It would be more accurate to say that in many offices, there is not much work done after lunch, though.
Fay: Why is that?
Chrissi: Up until maybe 20 years ago, working in an office in Greece mostly meant working in the public sector. And the public sector kept different business hours; still does, actually.
Fay: What are their hours?
Chrissi: Seven-thirty A.M. to 3:00 P.M. This means that Greek office culture is build around the assumption that 3:00 is punching out time.
Fay: Even in the private sector?
Chrissi: Yes, it is quite common.
Fay: But they still stay in the office until 5:00 P.M., right?
Chrissi: Yes. And sometimes until later. Being productive during those hours is another story, though!
Fay: Let’s be productive—and go to our vocabulary!
Chrissi: Right!
VOCAB LIST
Fay: First, we have…
Chrissi: τηλέφωνο [natural native speed].
Fay: Telephone.
Chrissi: τηλέφωνο [slowly - broken down by syllable]. τηλέφωνο [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: πελάτης [natural native speed].
Fay: Client, customer.
Chrissi: πελάτης [slowly - broken down by syllable]. πελάτης [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: γραφείο [natural native speed].
Fay: Office.
Chrissi: γραφείο [slowly - broken down by syllable]. γραφείο [natural native speed].
Fay: Next.
Chrissi: πρωί [natural native speed].
Fay: Morning.
Chrissi: πρωί [slowly - broken down by syllable]. πρωί [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: λεπτομέρεια [natural native speed].
Fay: Detail.
Chrissi: λεπτομέρεια [slowly - broken down by syllable]. λεπτομέρεια [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: προσφορά [natural native speed].
Fay: Offer.
Chrissi: προσφορά [slowly - broken down by syllable]. προσφορά [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: αριθμός [natural native speed].
Fay: Number.
Chrissi: αριθμός [slowly - broken down by syllable]. αριθμός [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: εταιρεία [natural native speed].
Fay: Company.
Chrissi: εταιρεία [slowly - broken down by syllable]. εταιρεία [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: παίρνω [natural native speed].
Fay: To take; call on the telephone.
Chrissi: παίρνω [slowly - broken down by syllable]. παίρνω [natural native speed].
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Fay: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What’s the word for “telephone number” in Greek?
Chrissi: We use two words. The most “proper” one is αριθμός (arithmos), but we also use νούμερο (noumero). So “telephone number” would be αριθμός τηλεφώνου (arithmos tilefonou) or νούμερο τηλεφώνου (noumero tilefonou). Try to repeat these two—they are very useful! Αριθμός τηλεφώνου (Arithmos tilefonou) or νούμερο τηλεφώνου (noumero tilefonou).
Fay: And how do we ask “What is your telephone number?”? That’s a handy phrase!
Chrissi: We usually say Ποιο είναι το τηλέφωνό σου; (Poio einai to tilefono sou?), which literally translates to “Which is your telephone?”. If you want to be more polite, you can say Θα μου δώσετε το τηλέφωνό σας; (Tha mou dosete to tilefono sas?), which means “Will you give me your phone number?”.
Fay: Can we hear those again? First the informal one.
Chrissi: Ποιο είναι το τηλέφωνό σου; (Poio einai to tilefono sou?).
Fay: And the more polite one?
Chrissi: Θα μου δώσετε το τηλέφωνό σας; (Tha mou dosete to tilefono sas?)
Fay: OK. And how do we say “I call” someone?
Chrissi: We use the verb παίρνω (pairno), which actually means “take.”
Fay: So “I’ll call you” is...?
Chrissi: Θα σε πάρω τηλέφωνο (Tha se paro tilefono). Literally “I will take you telephone.”
Fay: Sounds a little strange when you translate it like that!
Chrissi: Might help you remember it, though!
Fay: And how do we say “Call me”?
Chrissi: Πάρε τηλέφωνο (Pare me tilefono). Try repeating that. Πάρε με τηλέφωνο (Pare me tilefono).
Fay: This is informal, right?
Chrissi: Yes. The polite version would be Πάρτε με τηλέφωνο (Parte me tilefono) or, even more formal, Καλέστε με (Kaleste me).
Fay: Καλέστε; (Kaleste)? This is another verb?
Chrissi: Yes. Καλό (Kalo) is a Greek word that comes from the English “call.” But we don’t use it very much; it sounds too formal.
Fay: I see. Finally, what does γραφείο (grafeio) mean?
Chrissi: Γραφείο (Grafeio) means both “office” and “desk.” Beyond that, many Greeks who work in an office use it broadly to mean “work.”
Fay: For example?
Chrissi: Πάω στο γραφείο (Pao sto grafeio) literally means “I go to the office,” but it can also mean “I go to work.”
Fay: Great! Shall we move on to our main Grammar Point?
Chrissi: Sure!

Lesson focus

Fay: So what do we have for this lesson?
Chrissi: A concept that might seem a little strange to English speakers.
Fay: Cases, right?
Chrissi: Yes. You see, in Greek, articles, nouns, adjectives, pronouns, and participles are all declinable.
Fay: Which means they change according to their use in a sentence.
Chrissi: Exactly! The different forms they take are called “cases.” In Greek we call them πτώσεις (ptoseis).
Fay: How many cases are there in Greek?
Chrissi: Four—nominative, genitive, accusative, and vocative.
Fay: And how do we know when to use each?
Chrissi: The simplest way to remember that is to associating them with certain questions. For example, the nominative case answers the question “Who?”.
Fay: For example?
Chrissi: Ποιος είναι αυτός; (Poios einai autos?) “Who is he?”. Είναι ο Γιάννης (Einai o Yannis) “He is Yannis”.
Fay: OK. And the genitive?
Chrissi: It answers the question “Whose?”. Ποιανού είναι αυτό το αυτοκίνητο; (Poianou einai auto to autokinito?) “Whose car is this?”. Είναι της Μαρίας (Einai tis Marias) “It is Maria’s”.
Fay: And the other two cases, accusative and vocative?
Chrissi: Let’s stay on the genitive for now. You can read more in the PDF!
Fay: OK. How can we tell whether a noun is in the nominative or genitive case?
Chrissi: Besides context, the articles are different: the masculine "o" and the neuter "to" become "tou", and the feminine "i" becomes "tis".
Fay: These are for the singular number, right?
Chrissi: Yes. In this lesson we will deal only with singular.
Fay: Good. Can you give some examples of nouns in the nominative and genitive cases?
Chrissi: Yes. Ο υπολογιστής, του υπολογιστή (O ypologistis, tou ypologisti) “the computer,” “the computer’s”. Η καρέκλα, της καρέκλας (I karekla, tis kareklas) “the chair,” “the chair’s”. Το παράθυρο, του παραθύρου/παράθυρου (To parathiro, tou parathirou) “the window,” “the window’s”.
Fay: I notice there are some changes to the noun itself, too.
Chrissi: Yes, there are. You can also find those in our PDF.
Fay: So our listeners had better download it as soon as possible!
Chrissi: Yes!
Fay: What about the indefinite article?
Chrissi: The masculine ένας (enas) and the neuter ένα (ena) in the nominative case become ενός (enos) in the genitive, and the feminine μία (mia) in the nominative becomes μίας (mias) in the genitive.
Fay: Hmm. That’s quite a lot of changes!
Chrissi: Yes, but we have put them in a convenient table in the PDF.
Fay: OK, let’s stop for now. To recap, the genitive case is the one used to answer the question “Whose?”, pretty much like the “apostrophe -s” combination in English.
Chrissi: Right! If you remember this and the way the articles change, you’ll know all you need to about the genitive case—at least for now.
Fay: So let’s leave it at that, and we’ll be back for more later. Bye!
Chrissi: Γεια χαρά! (Geia chara!)

28 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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What did you eat at lunch today? Try to answer in Greek!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 02:00 AM
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Hi Jim,


No, you are not overthinking. It's the next logical thing to think! The default would be the masculine gender (ποιανού) and not just with this pronoun but with other pronouns as well. The feminine would be used in specific situations like the ones you described.


A different example where we ask with a masculine pronoun as a default way is:

Ποιος είναι; Who is it? (when answering the doorbell, for example)


All the best,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Jim Cleary
Wednesday at 12:46 AM
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Hi Stephania,


Thanks for that! Yes it does help to understand that the "whose" is a pronoun & will agree with the owner of the object, rather than the object, but it's also a bit odd that you need to assume the gender of the owner, when you are asking who the owner is!

I suppose it all depends on the situation - obviously if there are only women sitting at a table, it's fair to assume that one of them would be the owner of a cup of coffee on the table. Or if the object is clearly something that only a man or a woman would possess.

Is there a default that is used when you really have no idea who the owner might be? Or am I overthinking this? :-)


Thanks & Regards,


Jim.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:38 AM
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Hi Jim,


Great question.


First of all, a pronoun such as ποιανού, ποιανής and so on, is used in place of the name of a person, animal, or thing when we don't know the name or when we don't want to mention it. For example, when I say εγώ (a personal pronoun) I'm using it in place of my own name (Στεφανία).


Same here, we use ποιανού and ποιανής instead of a person's name. What we are asking with ποιανού is "Of which (male) person?" and with ποιανής is "of which (female) person?". So the pronoun refers to the person that owns the object (the pen, the car) NOT the actual object. We need to use a pronoun for these owners because we don't know their names and that's when pronouns come in handy.


I hope this is clearer now.


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Jim Cleary
Friday at 12:49 AM
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Hello,


I'm a little confused by the examples of the genitive:

Q: Ποιανού είναι αυτό το στυλό; (Pianou ine aftó to stiló?) "Whose is this pen?"

A: Είναι του Γιάννη. (Ine tou Yianni) "It is Yanni's."

Q: Ποιανής είναι αυτό το αυτοκίνητο; (Pianís ine aftó to aftokínito?) "Whose is this car?"

A: Είναι της Μαρίας. (Ine tis Marias) "It is Maria's."

Why use Ποιανού in the first example, but Ποιανής in the second one? Both στυλό and αυτοκίνητο are neuter, so shouldn't they both take Ποιανού?


Thanks & Regards

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 10:51 AM
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Hi Alain,


None. There's no difference. It's just an accentuation variation. Just like we say καμία or καμιά ("none" in the feminine).


Cheers,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Alain Côté
Sunday at 07:49 AM
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Hello! What is the difference between μια and μία? Thanks!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:30 PM
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Hi Katherine,


Thank you for posting.


We have the Lesson Notes pdf which contains the:

Dialogue

Vocabulary

Sample Sentences

Vocabulary Phrase Usage

Grammar

Cultural Insight


And the Lesson transcript pdf with the transcript of the hosts' speech for your follow up in case you wish to do so :)


As they're separate you can check them independently :)


But we appreciate your feedback for sure! We'll also take it into consideration for future development.


In case of any questions, please feel free to contact us.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team GreekPod101.com

Katherine
Wednesday at 05:30 PM
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Γεια σου,


I noticed the PDF button at the top of this page (under the table) is the one that contains the things they mention in the dialogue. But the PDF button at the bottom of the page only has the dialogue and no table. I'm not sure if this is deliberate, but it would be better to just have one PDF per lesson. Thanks :)

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:49 AM
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Γεια σου P Edginton,


παρακαλώ!:smile:


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

P Edginton
Wednesday at 04:46 AM
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Ευχαριστώ Στεφανία, Καταλαβαίνω τώρα