Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Fay: Hello, and welcome to GreekPod101.com, Beginner Season 1, Lesson 3 – Keeping It in the Greek Family. I’m Fay. I’m joined in the studio by…
Chrissi: Hi, Chrissi here.
Fay: What are we learning in this lesson?
Chrissi: We are looking at adjectives and how they are used in Modern Greek.
Fay: The conversation takes place at the home of Peter's Greek hosts.
Chrissi: It’s among the main character, Petra Gordon, her Greek friend, Danai Papadopoulo, and Danai’s sister, Kostantina Papadopoulos.
Fay: Since the characters are friends, the conversation is in informal language.
Chrissi: Let’s listen.

Lesson conversation

Δανάη Παπαδόπουλος: Πέτρα, αυτή είναι η αδελφή μου, η Κωσταντίνα που ζει μαζί μας και τα παιδιά μου
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Γεια. Είμαι η Πέτρα.
Κωσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Καλώς ήρθες στην Αθήνα και στο σπίτι μας!
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: A, τα παιδιά είναι σχεδόν ενήλικες! Πόσο είναι τώρα;
Κωσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Ο μεγάλος γιος της Δανάης είναι 18, ο μικρός είναι 15 και η κόρη της είναι 16.
Fay: Now, the slow version.
Δανάη Παπαδόπουλος: Πέτρα, αυτή είναι η αδελφή μου, η Κωσταντίνα που ζει μαζί μας και τα παιδιά μου
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Γεια. Είμαι η Πέτρα.
Κωσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Καλώς ήρθες στην Αθήνα και στο σπίτι μας!
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: A, τα παιδιά είναι σχεδόν ενήλικες! Πόσο είναι τώρα;
Κωσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Ο μεγάλος γιος της Δανάης είναι 18, ο μικρός είναι 15 και η κόρη της είναι 16.
Fay: Now, let’s listen to the conversation with English translation.
Δανάη Παπαδόπουλος: Πέτρα, αυτή είναι η αδελφή μου, η Κωσταντίνα που ζει μαζί μας και τα παιδιά μου
Fay: Petra, this is my sister Kostantina who lives with us and my children—Giorgos, Yannis, and Eleni.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Γεια. Είμαι η Πέτρα.
Fay: Hi. I'm Petra.
Κωσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Καλώς ήρθες στην Αθήνα και στο σπίτι μας!
Fay: Welcome to Athens and to our home!
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: A, τα παιδιά είναι σχεδόν ενήλικες! Πόσο είναι τώρα;
Fay: Oh, your kids are almost grown-ups! How old are they now?
Κωσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Ο μεγάλος γιος της Δανάης είναι 18, ο μικρός είναι 15 και η κόρη της είναι 16.
Fay: Danai's older son is 18, the younger is 15 and her daughter is 16.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Fay: So is it typical for an average Greek family to have three children?
Chrissi: I’d say it’s rather rare. Most Greek families these days have only one child; usually both parents work, so there’s a problem with childcare.
Fay: And how do families deal with it?
Chrissi: Mostly with the help of the grandparents—if they live close and are able to help.
Fay: Is it customary for Greeks to live close to their parents even after they get married?
Chrissi: Well, many do, yes. Family ties are still very strong in Greece! And not only among the basic family members; there are also strong ties with the extended family as well, even if they don’t actually live close by.
Fay: So when you make friends with a Greek…
Chrissi: …you make friends with many, many more! Shall we go on to our vocabulary?
Fay: Of course!
VOCAB LIST
Fay: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. First, we have…
Chrissi: αυτή [natural native speed].
Fay: This.
Chrissi: αυτή [slowly - broken down by syllable]. αυτή [natural native speed].
Fay: Next.
Chrissi: μου [natural native speed].
Fay: My.
Chrissi: μου [slowly - broken down by syllable]. μου [natural native speed].
Fay: Next.
Chrissi: παιδί [natural native speed].
Fay: Child.
Chrissi: παιδί [slowly - broken down by syllable]. παιδί [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: γιός [natural native speed].
Fay: Son.
Chrissi: γιός [slowly - broken down by syllable]. γιός [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: κόρη [natural native speed].
Fay: Daughter.
Chrissi: κόρη [slowly - broken down by syllable]. κόρη [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: Καλώς ήρθες [natural native speed].
Fay: Welcome.
Chrissi: Καλώς ήρθες [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Καλώς ήρθες [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: σπίτι [natural native speed].
Fay: Home, house.
Chrissi: σπίτι [slowly - broken down by syllable]. πίτι [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: πόσο
Fay: How much?
Chrissi: πόσο
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: τώρα [natural native speed].
Fay: Now.
Chrissi: τώρα [slowly - broken down by syllable]. τώρα [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: αδερφή [natural native speed].
Fay: Sister.
Chrissi: αδερφή [slowly - broken down by syllable]. αδερφή [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: μεγάλος [natural native speed].
Fay: Big, elder.
Chrissi: μεγάλος [slowly - broken down by syllable]. μεγάλος [natural native speed].
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Fay: Let's take a closer look at the words and phrases in this lesson. So what’s happening there with μεγάλος (megalos) and μικρός (mikros)? These are adjectives, right?
Chrissi: Yes. And we will talk about adjectives later. For the moment, let’s say that these particular adjectives have two meanings in modern Greek.
Fay: Which are?
Chrissi: First, they mean "big" and "small," as in μεγάλος δρόμος (megalos dromos) and μικρός δρόμος (mikros dromos).
Fay: Which mean “big street” and “small street.”
Chrissi: Right! Or in μεγάλος πύργος (megalos pirgos) and μικρός πύργος (mikros pirgos), “big tower” and “small tower.”
Fay: But in our dialogue they are used in a somewhat different way.
Chrissi: Yes. We say ο μεγάλος γιος (o megalos gios) and ο μικρός γιος (o mikros gios) to mean “the older son” and “the younger son.” Actually, they mean “the old son” and “the young son.”
Fay: So in Greek the adjectives μεγάλος (megalos) and μικρός (mikros)—that is, “big” and “small”—can also mean “younger” and “older” when we are speaking about two people’s ages, right?
Chrissi: Exactly.
Fay: OK, we made that clear. Beyond that, there was also something you wanted to say about the word σπίτι (spiti), wasn’t there?
Chrissi: Yes. In our dialogue, one character says Καλώς ήρθες στο σπίτι μας (Kalos irthes sto spiti mas).
Fay: Which means “welcome to our home,” doesn’t it?
Chrissi: Yes. But it could also mean “Welcome to our house”; you see, in Greek we don’t have a separate word for “home” and “house” like in English.
Fay: So how do you know which is which?
Chrissi: From the context. If we hear someone say Έχω ένα σπίτι στην Αθήνα (Echo ena spiti stin Athina), which means “I have a spiti in Athens,” this σπίτι (spiti) could only mean “house,” right?
Fay: Right. And if we want to say “I’m going home”?
Chrissi: This would be Πάω στο σπίτι (Pao sto spiti)—again we use σπίτι (spiti), but from the context it’s clear we’re talking about “home.”
Fay: This makes sense. So shall we move on to adjectives?
Chrissi: Sure!

Lesson focus

Fay: The focus of this lesson is adjectives.
Chrissi: Yes. Can you think of a language without adjectives?
Fay: Certainly not. It would be too boring! How are adjectives used in Greek?
Chrissi: Pretty much the same way as in English. We put them between the article and the noun, and they help us describe some quality of the noun.
Fay: So the order would be article-adjective-noun, yes?
Chrissi: Yes. For example, we can say ο κόκκινος μαρκαδόρος (o kokkinos markadoros). Try to repeat that.
Fay: Ο κόκκινος μαρκαδόρος (O kokkinos markadoros). This means “the red marker,” right?
Chrissi: Right! Or we can say "o leukos toichos". Would you like to repeat that?
Fay: Ο λευκός τοίχος (O leukos toichos). The white wall. How would we say “the right way”?
Chrissi: Ο σωστός δρόμος (O sostos dromos). All you people listening at home, try this too: ο σωστός δρόμος (o sostos dromos).
Fay: I see you always use the article ο (o), right?
Chrissi: Yes. This is the singular nominative of the masculine article; we want to keep things simple, so in this lesson we will focus on that.
Fay: Because adjectives are gendered—and numbered, right?
Chrissi: Exactly. But if we can grasp the singular nominative, we will have gone a long way to understanding how adjectives work. The order doesn’t change in the other cases or genders, or in the plural number.
Fay: Great! What else do we need to know about adjectives for now?
Chrissi: We could also mention that if there is a verb, the verb goes before the article.
Fay: Can you give an example?
Chrissi: Yes. Εγώ είμαι Έλληνας πολίτης (Ego eimai Ellinas politis), “I am a Greek citizen.”
Fay: Let’s repeat that.
Chrissi: Sure. Εγώ είμαι Έλληνας πολίτης (Ego eimai Ellinas politis). Or you could say Εγώ είμαι Αμερικανός πολίτης (Ego eimai Amerikanos politis), “I am an American citizen.”
Fay: You don’t use the indefinite article in Greek, though.
Chrissi: In this case, no. But we will speak about that in a future lesson! In our examples, the order is εγώ (ego)...
Fay: “I,” the personal pronoun.
Chrissi: Είμαι (Eimai).
Fay: “Am,” the verb.
Chrissi: Αμερικανός (Amerikanos).
Fay: “American,” the adjective.
Chrissi: And πολίτης (politis).
Fay: “Citizen,” the noun.
Chrissi: Right!
Fay: Or to go to a previous example about the right street, how can we say “This is the right street”?
Chrissi: Αυτός είναι ο σωστός δρόμος (Autos einai o sostos dromos). Again—pronoun, verb, article, adjective, noun. Repeat it after me. Αυτός είναι ο σωστός δρόμος (Autos einai o sostos dromos).
Fay: Αυτός είναι ο σωστός δρόμος (Autos einai o sostos dromos). Not that hard!
Chrissi: No, it isn’t!
Fay: So let’s stop here for now. Remember the right order [the same as in English] and be sure to check the PDFs for more examples on the use of adjectives. Bye-bye for now!
Chrissi: Γεια χαρά! (Geia chara!)

57 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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How many people do you have in your family?

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:32 AM
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Hi Giorgo!


Thank YOU for your kind comment!


Cheers,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

GIORGO DOS SANTOS
Monday at 08:23 PM
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Very nice lesson❤️️

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:33 AM
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Παρακαλώ, Alain!


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:31 AM
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Hi Alain,


Thank you for your feedback.


This is something we are aware of due to the fact that a voice actor might have to make multiple recordings at once, so not all adjectives that happen to be used for the first person might match the voice actor's gender. It is something we try to avoid but at times it's inevitable. We appreciate your comment though and this is something we are definitely taking into account.


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Alain Côté
Thursday at 06:18 AM
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Ευχαριστώ Στεφανία! Not easy to absorb and distinguish in speech, but very clear, thank you.


Alain

Alain Côté
Thursday at 06:15 AM
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In the first example sentence under "τώρα", it would be very helpful is either the voice was a woman's voice or if the adjective was in the masculine (απασχολημένος) to avoid the confusion as to why a man is saying he is busy in the femine gender!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:00 AM
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Hi Alain,


There's the interrogative adverb πού with an accent mark meaning "where", and there's the conjunction που without an accent mark meaning "that". For example. "Ο άντρας που μίλησε..." = "The man that spoke...".


In the dialogue, που has the second meaning although it has been translated as "who". If you change "who" with "that" the meaning would be the same. It's just that in English the sentence sounds more natural the way it is now.


I hope it's clearer now.


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Alain Côté
Thursday at 05:50 AM
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Hello! In the first sentence of the dialogue, it seems that the word που is used to reflect the idea of "who" in "my sister, who lives with us...". I am confused, I thought που meant "where" as in "που ειναι η τοαλέττα;" Is there something I am missing?


Thanks!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 04:18 PM
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Γεια σου Τζέισον!


Yes, "I am the Jason" is correct. Mind the accent though. It goes over έ: Τζέισον.


Γεια χαρά,


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Τζείσον
Thursday at 02:23 PM
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Γεια σου!


Just want to make sure - I should always say: Είμαι ο Τζείσον. I am the Jason, correct?


Ευχαριστώ!