Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Fay: Hello, everyone! This is Fay. Welcome to GreekPod101.com, Beginner Season 1, Lesson 23 - Now, Where Was It in Greece?
Chrissi: I’m Chrissi. Thanks for joining us at GreekPod101.com – the fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn Greek.
Fay: What are we learning in this lesson?
Chrissi: We are looking at third declension of nouns.
Fay: The conversation takes place in Danai’s car.
Chrissi: It’s between Petra, Danai, and Kostantina.
Fay: The characters are friends, so the conversation is informal.
Chrissi: Let’s listen.

Lesson conversation

Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: Αν δεν κάνω λάθος, το εστιατόριο είναι μετά από αυτό το φανάρι, έτσι δεν είναι Κοσταντίνα;
Κοσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Νομίζω. Είναι σε ένα μικρό στενό, δίπλα σε ένα μαγαζί με ρούχα.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Δεν το ξέρω αυτό το μέρος. Πώς λέγεται;
Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: Καλαμάκι. Ερχόμαστε συχνά το καλοκαίρι.
Fay: Now let’s listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: Αν δεν κάνω λάθος, το εστιατόριο είναι μετά από αυτό το φανάρι, έτσι δεν είναι Κοσταντίνα;
Κοσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Νομίζω. Είναι σε ένα μικρό στενό, δίπλα σε ένα μαγαζί με ρούχα.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Δεν το ξέρω αυτό το μέρος. Πώς λέγεται;
Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: Καλαμάκι. Ερχόμαστε συχνά το καλοκαίρι.
Fay: Now let’s listen to the conversation with English translation.
Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: Αν δεν κάνω λάθος, το εστιατόριο είναι μετά από αυτό το φανάρι, έτσι δεν είναι Κοσταντίνα;
Fay: If I'm not mistaken, the restaurant is after this traffic light, isn't it, Kostantina?
Κοσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Νομίζω. Είναι σε ένα μικρό στενό, δίπλα σε ένα μαγαζί με ρούχα.
Fay: I think so. It's in an alley next to a shop selling clothes.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Δεν το ξέρω αυτό το μέρος. Πώς λέγεται;
Fay: I don't know this place. What is it called?
Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: Καλαμάκι. Ερχόμαστε συχνά το καλοκαίρι.
Fay: Kalamaki. We come here often in the summer.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Fay: So is Athens an easy city to drive around?
Chrissi: It definitely isn’t!
Fay: I remember you mentioning something about too many cars. Is there something else?
Chrissi: Well, “too many cars” isn’t a small problem; if you see what I mean by “too many cars,” you’ll understand!
Fay: How about the road network?
Chrissi: This is the other half of the problem. There are many small streets that get crowded very quickly. And these streets lead to big streets that also get crowded very quickly; you get the idea.
Fay: So I’ll probably need a GPS to get around. Are there GPSes for Athens?
Chrissi: Of course—in English, too, if by then your Greek isn’t up to par. Taxi drivers use them all the time. But I suggest you don’t drive in Athens. Walk, take the metro, maybe rent a motorcycle, but avoid driving!
Fay: Duly noted. Shall we move on to our vocabulary?
Chrissi: Yes!
VOCAB LIST
Fay: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary in this lesson. First…
Chrissi: λάθος [natural native speed].
Fay: Mistake, wrong.
Chrissi: λάθος [slowly - broken down by syllable]. λάθος [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: εστιατόριο [natural native speed].
Fay: Restaurant.
Chrissi: εστιατόριο [slowly - broken down by syllable]. εστιατόριο [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: φανάρι [natural native speed].
Fay: Traffic light.
Chrissi: φανάρι [slowly - broken down by syllable]. φανάρι [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: νομίζω [natural native speed].
Fay: I think.
Chrissi: νομίζω [slowly - broken down by syllable]. νομίζω [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: μικρό [natural native speed].
Fay: Small.
Chrissi: μικρό [slowly - broken down by syllable]. μικρό [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: στενό [natural native speed].
Fay: Alley.
Chrissi: στενό [slowly - broken down by syllable]. στενό [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: μαγαζί [natural native speed].
Fay: Shop.
Chrissi: μαγαζί [slowly - broken down by syllable]. μαγαζί [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: ρούχα [natural native speed].
Fay: Clothes.
Chrissi: ρούχα [slowly - broken down by syllable]. ρούχα [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: μέρος [natural native speed].
Fay: Place.
Chrissi: μέρος [slowly - broken down by syllable]. μέρος [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: καλοκαίρι [natural native speed].
Fay: Summer.
Chrissi: καλοκαίρι [slowly - broken down by syllable]. καλοκαίρι [natural native speed].
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Fay: Let's take a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. So φανάρι (fanari) means “traffic light”?
Chrissi: In everyday conversation, yes. But it can mean all kinds of lamps.
Fay: Like?
Chrissi: Like a car’s headlights, as in Άναψα τα φανάρια γιατί είχε σκοτάδι (Anapsa ta fanaria giati eiche skotadi) "I turned on the headlights because it was dark”.
Fay: I see. What other kind of lamps can φανάρι (fanari) be?
Chrissi: The ones we put in gardens, even the old handheld ones with a candle inside; all these are φανάρια (fanaria).
Fay: Let’s go to νομίζω (nomizo). What does that mean?
Chrissi: It means “I think” in the sense of “I believe”, as in “I think it’s going to rain.”
Fay: Some examples?
Chrissi: “I think it’s going to rain” is Νομίζω ότι θα βρέξει (Nomizo oti tha breksei). Listeners, repeat that.
Fay: Another example?
Chrissi: Νομίζω ότι έχει δίκιο (Nomizo oti echei dikio). “I believe that he is right.”
Fay: Νομίζω ότι έχει δίκιο (Nomizo oti echei dikio).
Chrissi: We can use νομίζω (nomizo) in all such cases.
Fay: Cool. Next, what’s “alley” in Greek?
Chrissi: Στενό (Steno) or its diminutive, στενάκι (stenaki).
Fay: Could we get an example?
Chrissi: “The shop is in the alley” is Το μαγαζί είναι στο στενό (To magazi einai sto steno).
Fay: And another one?
Chrissi: “Turn left at the alley” is Στρίψε αριστερά στο στενό (Stripse aristera sto steno).
Fay: Okay. Now that you mention μαγαζί (magazi), this means “store,” right?
Chrissi: Yes. “Store” or “shop.”
Fay: But the word is generic.
Chrissi: A “hardware store” specifically is μαγαζί με εργαλεία (magazi me ergaleia), which literally means “store with tools.”
Fay: And a shoe store?
Chrissi: Μαγαζί με παπούτσια (Magazi me papoutsia). Listeners, repeat that, too.
Fay: So a bookstore would be μαγαζί με βιβλία (magazi me vivlia)?
Chrissi: Actually, no! There are some dedicated words for particular shops.
Fay: So what is a bookstore?
Chrissi: Βιβλιοπωλείο (Vivliopoleio). Literally, book-selling place.
Fay: I see. And a clothing store?
Chrissi: Back to μαγαζί με ρούχα (magazi me roucha)!
Fay: A little complicated, isn’t it?
Chrissi: Oh, you get used to it.

Lesson focus

Fay: The focus of this lesson is the third declension. Μαγαζί (Magazi) "shop” is a neuter noun, isn’t it?
Chrissi: Yes. So it belongs to the third declension.
Fay: After the first declension (masculine) and the second (feminine), we get to the third, which is for neuter nouns, right?
Chrissi: Right! All neuter nouns belong to the third declension, but there are smaller divisions within this declension.
Fay: What are they?
Chrissi: The first class, which includes parisyllabic nouns, and the second class, which includes imparisyllabic nouns.
Fay: Big words!
Chrissi: Yes, but what they mean is quite simple, frankly. Parisyllabic nouns are those with the same number of syllables in the singular and plural; the others are imparisyllabic.
Fay: That’s easy! Can we have some examples?
Chrissi: Μαγαζί (Magazi) becomes μαγαζιά (magazia) in the plural—same number of syllables, so it’s parisyllabic. Φανάρι (Fanari) "traffic light” becomes φανάρια (fanaria)—also parisyllabic. And τραπέζι (trapezi) "table” becomes τραπέζια (trapezia)—another parisyllabic noun.
Fay: How about imparisyllabics?
Chrissi: Κύμα (Kyma) "wave” becomes κύματα (kymata) in the plural. That’s one more syllable than the singular had.
Fay: Another example?
Chrissi: Φως (Fos) "light,” as in “sunlight” or “electric light” becomes φώτα (fota) in the plural. Again, one more syllable. And κρέας (kreas) "meat” becomes κρέατα (kreata).
Fay: One more syllable. I’m guessing that neuter nouns, like masucline and feminine nouns, have a variety of endings.
Chrissi: It’s true. We use those endings and the parisyllabic/imparisyllabic distinction to categorize neuter nouns.
Fay: What endings do they have?
Chrissi: Let’s see. They can end in -o like το δέντρο (to dentro) "the tree", in -i like το ποτήρι (to potiri) "the glass", in -os like το μήκος (to mikos) "the length", in -ma like το βλέμμα (to vlemma) "the look", in -simo like το γράψιμο (to grapsimo) "the writing", in -as like το τέρας (to teras) “the monster”, and in -os [but with omega, the other o] like το φως (to fos) "the light” that we just mentioned.
Fay: Does every neuter noun fall into one of those seven categories?
Chrissi: Actually, most fall into the first three—-o, -i, and -os (with omicron, the regular o). The other four categories have very few nouns.
Fay: Is there anything we can say about all neuter nouns to help our listeners?
Chrissi: Two things. They’ll make life a lot easier.
Fay: Let’s hear them!
Chrissi: All neuter nouns have three identical cases in both numbers—the nominative, the accusative, and the vocative.
Fay: Okay. Less to remember!
Chrissi: Yes!
Fay: And the other note?
Chrissi: All neuter nouns form their genitive plural with the ending -on.
Fay: Also less to remember.
Chrissi: Yes. You’ll find all these nouns more in the PDF.
Fay: So don’t forget to download it, okay? Get instant access to all of our language learning lessons.
Chrissi: With any subscription, instantly access our entire library of audio and video lessons.
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Chrissi: Put them on your phone or in other mobile device and listen, watch and learn anywhere.
Fay: Lessons are organized by level, so progress in order one level at a time.
Chrissi: Or skip around to different levels. It’s up to you.
Fay: Instantly access them all right now at GreekPod101.com. Bye for now!
Chrissi: Γεια! (Geiá)!

Grammar

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10 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Which means of transportation will you use when you arrive in Greece?

GreekPod101.com
Monday at 02:27 PM
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Hi Steven,


Να καταλάβω is a verb form (verb καταλαβαίνω) in the subjunctive mood. Καταλαβαίνω is a verb form in the indicative mood.


The subjunctive is very common after a verb, for example, προσπαθώ. Προσπαθώ να καταλάβω. I'm trying TO UNDERSTAND. The subjunctive indicates intention, something we want or expect to happen or even the unreal. This type of subjunctive gets rendered with an English infinitive (we don't have such verb form in Greek).


On the other hand, the indicative mood presents the verb as a fact. Καταλαβαίνω, I understand.


I hope this helps a bit.


All the best,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Steven
Thursday at 01:26 AM
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Υπάρχει ενα παράδειγμα στο pdf:

"Προσπαθώ να καταλάβω πού έκανα λάθος."

Είναι "καταλάβω" το ίδιο με "καταλαβαίνω";


Ευχαριστώ!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:42 PM
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Γεια σου Αλεξία!


Μπράβο σου για τα ελληνικά σου!

(Well done for your Greek)


I hope you allow me to make a few minor corrections according to your English sentence:

Όταν ταξιδέψω στην Ελλάδα, θα χρησιμοποιήσω αεροπλάνα και ένα φέρι. Ελπίζω να χρησιμοποιήσω μοτοσικλέτα/μηχανή όταν θα είμαι εκεί.


Με το καλό να μας έρθεις!

(A wish that roughly means "may you come safe and sound")


Stefania,

Team GreekPod101.com

Αλεξια
Saturday at 11:52 AM
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Όταν ταξιδέυω στην Ελλάδα, θα χρησιμοποιήσω αεροπλάνα και ένα πλοίο. Ελπίζω να κάνει μοτοσυκλέτα όταν είμαι εκέι.

When I travel to Greece, I will use airplanes and a ferry. I hope to ride a motorcycle when I am there.

Ιουστίνα
Friday at 10:35 PM
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Σε ευχαριστώ πολύ, Στεφανία!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Friday at 01:12 PM
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Γεια σου Ιουστίνα,


στρέφω = twist, turn.

They are very similar for us.


For example when you turn the round knob of a door or when you twist the lid of a bottle to open. You can use στρέφω or στρίβω. They are synonyms.


As for the means of transportation you have used in Greek, these are pretty much all we have! Mind "λεωφορεία" and "γαϊδάρους". You need accusative on those ones.


Very good!


Stefania,

Team GreekPod101.com

Ιουστίνα
Wednesday at 08:34 AM
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Question about one of the flashcards:


στρέφω = twist


Is that the most common use of στρέφω? I found "turn" in the dictionary, but not "twist". Thank you.

Ιουστίνα
Wednesday at 08:20 AM
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Ξέχασα ταχί και βάρκες.


I forgot taxis and small boats.

Ιουστίνα
Wednesday at 08:08 AM
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Στην Ελλάδα έχω χρησιμοποίησει αυτοκίνητα, αεροπλάνα, λεωφερεία, τρένα, φέριμποτ, μοτοποδήλατα, ποδήλατα, γάιδαροι και τα πόδια μου.


In Greece I have used cars, airplanes, buses, trains, ferry boats, mopeds, bicycles, donkeys, and my feet.