Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Fay: Hello, and welcome back to GreekPod101.com. Beginner Season 1, Lesson 20 - The Greek Kids Are All Right. I’m Fay, and I’m joined by…
Chrissi: Chrissi.
Fay: What are we learning in this lesson?
Chrissi: We are looking at the definite article.
Fay: The conversation takes place at the Acropolis archaeological site.
Chrissi: It’s between Petra Gordon and her Greek host, Kostantina and Danai who are sisters.
Fay: The characters are friends so the conversation is informal.
Chrissi: Let’s listen.

Lesson conversation

Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Κρίμα που τα παιδιά σας δεν μπόρεσαν να έρθουν.
Κωσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Ε, ο μικρός γιος της Δανάης και η κόρη της μελετάνε για τις εξετάσεις τους και ο μεγάλος της γιος είχε να κάνει κάτι δουλειές.
Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: «Δουλειές»! Απλώς ήθελε να μείνει στο σπίτι!
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Είναι καλό πάντως που όλα τα παιδιά είναι στο σπίτι, δεν είναι;
Κωσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Από τη μία, είναι καλό για τα παιδιά και για μας. Από την άλλη, δεν είναι καλό για το σπίτι και τους γείτονες...
Fay: Now let’s listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Κρίμα που τα παιδιά σας δεν μπόρεσαν να έρθουν.
Κωσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Ε, ο μικρός γιος της Δανάης και η κόρη της μελετάνε για τις εξετάσεις τους και ο μεγάλος της γιος είχε να κάνει κάτι δουλειές.
Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: «Δουλειές»! Απλώς ήθελε να μείνει στο σπίτι!
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Είναι καλό πάντως που όλα τα παιδιά είναι στο σπίτι, δεν είναι;
Κωσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Από τη μία, είναι καλό για τα παιδιά και για μας. Από την άλλη, δεν είναι καλό για το σπίτι και τους γείτονες...
Fay: Now let’s listen to the conversation with English translation.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Κρίμα που τα παιδιά σας δεν μπόρεσαν να έρθουν.
Fay: It's a shame that your kids couldn't come.
Κωσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Ε, ο μικρός γιος της Δανάης και η κόρη της μελετάνε για τις εξετάσεις τους και ο μεγάλος της γιος είχε να κάνει κάτι δουλειές.
Fay: Well, Danai's young son and daughter had to study for their exams, and her older son had some errands to run.
Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: «Δουλειές»! Απλώς ήθελε να μείνει στο σπίτι!
Fay: "Errands to run!" He just wanted to stay at home!
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Είναι καλό πάντως που όλα τα παιδιά είναι στο σπίτι, δεν είναι;
Fay: It's good, though, that all the kids are at home, isn't it?
Κωσταντίνα Παπαδοπούλου: Από τη μία, είναι καλό για τα παιδιά και για μας. Από την άλλη, δεν είναι καλό για το σπίτι και τους γείτονες...
Fay: On the one hand, it's good for the kids and for us. On the other hand, it's not good for the house and the neighbors...
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Fay: So neighborhoods in Greece are small, tight-knit communities, right?
Chrissi: You’re probably thinking of the communities you see on islands or in villages. This doesn’t happen in the cities anymore.
Fay: Why is that?
Chrissi: Probably because cities have become too big. The best example is Athens. It has six million people.
Fay: Well, that is big!
Chrissi: Yes. So there’s not much interaction between neighbors.
Fay: How about people living in the same building?
Chrissi: Well, people speak to each other occasionally but there’s no real sense of a neighborhood. Maybe in some areas of Athens.
Fay: Like?
Chrissi: I don’t know. Plaka, near the Acropoli, or downtown Eksarcheia or Kolonaki.
Fay: So those picturesque little neighborhoods with people sitting on porches and talking until late night are gone?
Chrissi: Yes, I’m afraid. But like I said, if you go the islands, you might still find some. But shouldn’t we move on to our vocabulary?
Fay: Sure! Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. First…
VOCAB LIST
Chrissi: κρίμα [natural native speed].
Fay: Pity, shame.
Chrissi: κρίμα [slowly - broken down by syllable]. κρίμα [natural native speed].
Chrissi: δεν μπόρεσα [natural native speed].
Fay: I couldn't.
Chrissi: δεν μπόρεσα [slowly - broken down by syllable]. δεν μπόρεσα [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: έρχομαι [natural native speed].
Fay: To come.
Chrissi: έρχομαι [slowly - broken down by syllable]. έρχομαι [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: μελετάω [natural native speed].
Fay: To study.
Chrissi: μελετάω [slowly - broken down by syllable]. μελετάω [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: εξετάσεις [natural native speed].
Fay: Examinations.
Chrissi: εξετάσεις [slowly - broken down by syllable]. εξετάσεις [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: κάνω [natural native speed].
Fay: To do.
Chrissi: κάνω [slowly - broken down by syllable]. κάνω [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: μένω [natural native speed].
Fay: To stay; live.
Chrissi: μένω [slowly - broken down by syllable]. μένω [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: καλό [natural native speed].
Fay: Good.
Chrissi: καλό [slowly - broken down by syllable]. καλό [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: γείτονας [natural native speed].
Fay: Neighbor.
Chrissi: γείτονας [slowly - broken down by syllable]. γείτονας [natural native speed].
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Fay: Let's take a closer look at some of the words and phrases in this lesson. Let’s see. Δουλειές (Douleies) means “jobs,” right?
Chrissi: Yes. It’s the plural of douleia, which means “job” or “work.” Δεν υπάρχουν αρκετές δουλειές για όλους (Den yparchoun arketes douleies gia olous) "There are not enough jobs for everybody”.
Fay: A big problem, to be sure. But in our dialogue it is translated as “errands.”
Chrissi: Yes, the same word is used to mean “errands.” For example, Σήμερα έχω πολλές δουλειές (Simera echo polles douleies) "I have many things to do/many errands to run.” Listeners, repeat this—it’s a useful sentence!
Fay: Okay. What does pantos mean?
Chrissi: It’s an adverb meaning something like “though.” We use it to express a different opinion.
Fay: An example?
Chrissi: Εγώ πάντως θα πάω (Ego pantos tha pao) means “I’ll go, though.”
Fay: “Even if you say you won’t go.”
Chrissi: Exactly!
Fay: Another example?
Chrissi: Νομίζω πάντως ότι δεν έχεις δίκιο (Nomizo pantos oti den echeis dikio) means “I think you aren’t right, though.”
Fay: Got it. Finally, is there a word that’s just “e”?
Chrissi: Not exactly a word, more of a filler. We use it to end the overall feel of sentences what can you do?
Fay: An example?
Chrissi: Ε, τα πράγματα δεν πάνε καλά (E, ta pragmata den pane kala). Things aren’t going well.
Fay: And another?
Chrissi: Ε, όπως καταλαβαίνεις, τελικά κάτσαμε στο σπίτι (E, opos katalabaineis, telika katsame sto spiti). Well, as you understand, we finally stayed at home.
Fay: So it can be used the same way as well in English?
Chrissi: In its pessimistic sense, yes.
Fay: Okay. On to our grammar.

Lesson focus

Fay: What’s our main Grammar Point for today?
Chrissi: It’s the definite article.
Fay: Very basic stuff, huh?
Chrissi: Yes. But in Greek it’s a little more complicated than in English.
Fay: Because it’s…
Chrissi: Gendered.
Fay: So we actually have to learn three articles.
Chrissi: Five—it also has a plural!
Fay: Yeesh. Well, let’s get into them!
Chrissi: Okay. The singular definite article is ο (o) for masculine, η (i) for feminine, and το (to) for neuter.
Fay: O, i, and to—got it!
Chrissi: The plural is οι (oi) for masculine and feminine and τα (ta) for neuter.
Fay: That’s not bad. Οι, οι, τα (Oi, oi, ta).
Chrissi: Of course, all these are in the nominative case. You can find the rest of the cases in the PDF.
Fay: Got that, listeners? One more reason to download the PDF immediately!
Chrissi: In the meantime, let’s take a few nouns through the full set of cases, numbers, and genders.
Fay: We’re all ears.
Chrissi: “The computer” is ο υπολογιστής (o ypologistis). Let’s walk our computer through its cases. Ο υπολογιστής (O ypologistis), του υπολογιστή (tou ypologisti), τον υπολογιστή (ton ypologisti), and υπολογιστή (ypologisti)—there’s no article for the vocative case.
Fay: Good. And the plural?
Chrissi: Οι υπολογιστές (Oi ypologistes), των υπολογιστών (ton ypologiston), τους υπολογιστές (tous ypologistes), υπολογιστές (ypologistes).
Fay: Still with us? We just took a masculine noun and its indefinite article through both numbers and all four cases. Now we’ll do the same for a feminine noun. Listeners, repeat after Chrissi, okay?
Chrissi: “The sea” is η θάλασσα (i thalassa). The cases are η θάλασσα (i thalassa), της θάλασσας (tis thalassas), τη θάλασσα (ti thalassa), θάλασσα (thalassa).
Fay: That was one sea. How about more than one sea?
Chrissi: Οι θάλασσες (Oi thalasses), των θαλασσών (ton thalasson), τις θάλασσες (tis thalasses), θάλασσες (thalasses).
Fay: That was a feminine noun, singular and plural, in all four cases with the definite article. Last we’ll do the same thing for a neuter noun. The article will also be neuter, won’t it?
Chrissi: Yes, that’s a nice thing about definite articles—they tell you what gender their nouns are going to be!
Fay: That is nice. Can we decline our neuter noun now?
Chrissi: “The letter” is το γράμμα (to gramma). Its cases in the singular are το γράμμα (to gramma), του γράμματος (tou grammatos), το γράμμα (to gramma), and γράμμα(gramma).
Fay: And in the plural?
Chrissi: Τα γράμματα (Ta grammata), των γραμμάτων (ton grammaton), τα γράμματα (ta grammata), and γράμματα (grammata).
Fay: There you have it, folks—all the Greek definite articles in one compact package.
Chrissi: Be sure to learn them as soon as possible. They will help you enormously—mostly with nouns, but also in getting a general feel for the language.
Listeners, do you know the reason flash cards are so popular?
Fay: It’s because they work!
Chrissi: We’ve taken this time-tested studying tool and modernized with My Wordbank flashcards.
Fay: Learn vocabulary using your eyes and ears.
Chrissi: It’s simple and powerful. Save difficult and interesting words to your personal vocabulary list called My Word Bank.
Fay: Master words in your My Word Bank by practicing with flashcards.
Chrissi: Words in My Word Bank come with audio so you learn proper pronunciation.
Fay: …while you learn to recognize words by sight.
Chrissi: Go to GreekPod101.com now and try My Word Bank and flash cards today.
Fay: Bye for now.
Chrissi: Γεια χαρά! (Geia chara!)

30 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Do you know your neighboors?

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 09:06 AM
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Γεια σου Bill Park,


Thank you so much for your positive message! 😇❤️️

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Γεια χαρά,

Λέβεντε (Levente)

Team GreekPod101.com

Bill Park
Wednesday at 11:03 AM
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Thanks Stefania...all this is helping me understand the lyrics of Γρηγόρης Μπιθικώτσης songs!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 10:39 PM
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Hi Bill,


Thank you for asking about that.


I think it's brilliant that you managed to figure this one out before I got the chance to answer you! As you realized της means "her". Word order in Greek can be quite flexible so such words might be found in weird places unexpectedly. Part of learning though, and especially learning through such mistakes, is that once you reach the point where you are able to figure out some things on your own, you won't forget them later or it will be very difficult to forget. The road might seems long but I have a feeling that you are on a good path.


Keep it up!


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Bill Park
Sunday at 02:58 AM
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Sorry didn’t learn lesson well and now see that article before eldest son is genitive for her eldest son... I still have lots to learn!!!!

Bill Park
Sunday at 02:50 AM
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Please explain why in the dialogue you use the feminine accusative before a masculine noun for eldest son. Thanks

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 01:00 AM
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Γεια σου Λεωνίδα,


εγώ δεν ξέρω τους γείτονές μου :/


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Λεωνίδας
Wednesday at 08:34 PM
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Ναι, ξέρω μερικές γείτονές μου.

Και στην πρόιν Σοβιετική Ένωση οι σχέσεις μεταξύ των γειτώνων ήταν στενότερες, και στις μεγάλες πόλεις. Τώρα όμως τα πράγματα άλλαξαν πολύ, συχνά η άνθρωποι ούτε ξέρουν τους γείτονές τους.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:28 AM
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Hi Elisabeth,


I see. Well, it was an interesting question! I rarely receive such inquiries.


Να 'σαι καλά,


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

ElisabethK
Tuesday at 04:10 PM
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Thank you! Not planning to move, but I am still very interested in Greek life and history! 😄

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 08:51 AM
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Hi Elisabeth,


Interesting question!


On a very general scale, we can say that the northern suburbs are the richest and fancier, where the elite lives (artists, politicians, and other VIPS). The western ones are the most industrial, populated by the working class mainly. The southern suburbs are also considered rich and expensive, especially the areas along the coast, due to the sea, the views and the nightlife. Keep in mind that Piraeus, located south of Athens, is a city on its own so it's not part of the Athens suburbs. It borders the south and west Athens suburbs. The eastern suburbs are similar to the southern ones due to the sea, but they are much less densely populated. They used to be vacation areas where Athenians would have their summer houses and some places still are (because some areas have become more urban as the city grew.)


Of course within those areas (north, south, east, west suburbs) there are some areas that are more rich or more poor than the others.


The richest Athens neighbourhoods are: Εκάλη, Κηφισιά, Φιλοθέη, Βούλα, Βουλιαγμένη, Βάρκιζα, Γλυφάδα, Κολωνάκι (and areas along the Λεωφόρος Ποσειδώνος coastal road).

And in Piraeus: Πειραϊκή, Φρεαττύδα, Προφήτης Ηλίας, Καστέλα, Πασαλιμάνι.


Are you planning to move to Athens soon? :)


Cheers,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com