Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Fay: Hi! My name is Fay and I’m joined here by…
Chrissi: Chrissi.
Fay: Beginner Season 1, Lesson 13 - What Do You Have in Greece? I’m Fay.
Chrissi: Hi, everyone. Welcome back to GreekPod101.com.
Fay: What are we learning in this lesson?
Chrissi: We are looking at the accusative case of nouns and how it’s used with the verb “echo” (“to have”).
Fay: The conversation takes place in the software company where Petra works.
Chrissi: It’s between Petra and Danai.
Fay: Since the characters work and live together, the conversation is informal.

Lesson conversation

Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: Πέτρα είσαι ευχαριστημένη με τον εξοπλισμό σου;
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Ναι. Έχω τον υπολογιστή που χρειάζομαι, έχω την οθόνη που χρειάζομαι, έχω τα προγράμματα που χρειάζομαι, έχω την υποστήριξη που χρειάζομαι –όλα είναι μια χαρά.
Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: Αν έχεις κάποιο πρόβλημα να μου πεις.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Ευχαριστώ. Εξάλλου, έχω και το τηλέφωνο της εταιρείας που κάνει τη μηχανογραφική υποστήριξη.
Fay: Now let’s listen to the slow version.
Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: Πέτρα είσαι ευχαριστημένη με τον εξοπλισμό σου;
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Ναι. Έχω τον υπολογιστή που χρειάζομαι, έχω την οθόνη που χρειάζομαι, έχω τα προγράμματα που χρειάζομαι, έχω την υποστήριξη που χρειάζομαι –όλα είναι μια χαρά.
Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: Αν έχεις κάποιο πρόβλημα να μου πεις.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Ευχαριστώ. Εξάλλου, έχω και το τηλέφωνο της εταιρείας που κάνει τη μηχανογραφική υποστήριξη.
Fay: Let’s listen to the conversation with English translation.
Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: Πέτρα είσαι ευχαριστημένη με τον εξοπλισμό σου;
Fay: Peter, are you happy with your equipment?
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Ναι. Έχω τον υπολογιστή που χρειάζομαι, έχω την οθόνη που χρειάζομαι, έχω τα προγράμματα που χρειάζομαι, έχω την υποστήριξη που χρειάζομαι –όλα είναι μια χαρά.
Fay: Yes. I have the computer that I need, I have the screen that I need, I have the software that I need, I have the support that I need—everything is fine.
Δανάη Παπαδοπούλου: Αν έχεις κάποιο πρόβλημα να μου πεις.
Fay: If you have any problems, just let me know.
Πέτρα Γκόρντον: Ευχαριστώ. Εξάλλου, έχω και το τηλέφωνο της εταιρείας που κάνει τη μηχανογραφική υποστήριξη.
Fay: Thanks. Besides, I also have the number of the company that does IT support.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Fay: Not very tech-savvy, your compatriots, huh?
Chrissi: To be honest, I’ve met some incredibly talented programmers and internet gurus, but as a rule, no, not so much.
Fay: Why is that?
Chrissi: Greece’s history was very troubled until the mid-’70s. So technology just stormed in at some point after that.
Fay: But in Greece, everyone has at least one cell phone.
Chrissi: That’s the really weird thing. Some aspects of technology are extremely popular while others, extremely not.
Fay: How about the internet?
Chrissi: It’s been booming since the mid-’90s. Still, only half the population is online.
Fay: So people are getting more and more familiar with technology.
Chrissi: Yes, but at a rather slow pace, I’m afraid.
Fay: You never know. You may see a sudden boom.
Chrissi: Maybe.
Fay: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Fay: First of all, we have…
Chrissi: ευχαριστημένος [natural native speed].
Fay: Happy, pleased.
Chrissi: ευχαριστημένος [slowly - broken down by syllable]. ευχαριστημένος [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: έχω [natural native speed].
Fay: I have.
Chrissi: έχω [slowly - broken down by syllable]. έχω [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: εξοπλισμός [natural native speed].
Fay: Equipment.
Chrissi: εξοπλισμός [slowly - broken down by syllable]. εξοπλισμός [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: υπολογιστής [natural native speed].
Fay: Computer.
Chrissi: υπολογιστής [slowly - broken down by syllable]. υπολογιστής [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: οθόνη [natural native speed].
Fay: Monitor (computer).
Chrissi: οθόνη [slowly - broken down by syllable]. οθόνη [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: προγράμματα [natural native speed].
Fay: Programs (software).
Chrissi: προγράμματα [slowly - broken down by syllable]. προγράμματα [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: υποστήριξη [natural native speed].
Fay: Support.
Chrissi: υποστήριξη [slowly - broken down by syllable]. υποστήριξη [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: χρειάζομαι [natural native speed].
Fay: To need.
Chrissi: χρειάζομαι [slowly - broken down by syllable]. χρειάζομαι [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: έχεις [natural native speed].
Fay: You have.
Chrissi: έχεις [slowly - broken down by syllable]. έχεις [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: κάποιο [natural native speed].
Fay: Some, any.
Chrissi: κάποιο [slowly - broken down by syllable]. κάποιο [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: πρόβλημα [natural native speed].
Fay: Problem.
Chrissi: πρόβλημα [slowly - broken down by syllable]. πρόβλημα [natural native speed].
Fay: Next…
Chrissi: ευχαριστώ [natural native speed].
Fay: Thank you.
Chrissi: ευχαριστώ [slowly - broken down by syllable]. ευχαριστώ [natural native speed].
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Fay: Let's take a closer look at some of the words and phrases in this lesson. We have a couple of very useful phrases here, don’t we?
Chrissi: Yes!
Fay: First of all, a very popular and powerful expression—”Thank you.”
Chrissi: Ευχαριστώ (Eucharisto). Ευ-χα-ρι-στώ (Eu-cha-ri-sto).
Fay: Just one word?
Chrissi: Yes. It literally means “I thank”; “you” is omitted because it’s assumed to be directed to the person you are addressing.
Fay: And “thank you very much” is?
Chrissi: Ευχαριστώ πολύ (Eucharisto poly). Repeat this, because it is indeed very useful. Ευχαριστώ. Πολύ. (Eucharisto. Poly.)
Fay: This is also the polite version of “thank you”. This is also the polite version of “thank you”?
Chrissi: You, know, we don’t really have a “less polite” version of “thank you” in Greek, like “thanks” or (ta). Ευχαριστώ (Eucharisto) pretty much covers all cases.
Fay: Now about that μια χαρά (mia chara) phrase.
Chrissi: Another good phrase to know in Greek. Μια χαρά (Mia chara.) This is the Greek version of “okay” or “fine.”
Fay: So if I ask Τι κάνεις; (Ti kaneis?) “How are you?”, you will say…
Chrissi: Είμαι μια χαρά, ευχαριστώ. (Eimai mia chara, eucharisto.)
Fay: I’m fine, thank you.
Chrissi: Yes.
Fay: Can you repeat that?
Chrissi: Είμαι μια χαρά, ευχαριστώ. (Eimai mia chara, eucharisto.) Listeners, repeat that!
Fay: Finally, there is the word κάποιο (kapoio). Κάποιο πρόβλημα. (Kapoio provlima.)
Chrissi: This is a little difficult to tackle right now. The short version is that in this context it means “some problem” or “any problem.”
Fay: What does it really mean?
Chrissi: A specific something. Kapoio estiatorio means “some specific restaurant,” and kapoios filos means “a particular friend.”
Fay: So how can we be sure what it means at any given time?
Chrissi: Unfortunately, just rom context. But let’s not worry about this for now. Just remember that it means “a specific something or someone.”
Fay: Okay. So shall we move to our main Grammar Point?
Chrissi: Yes!

Lesson focus

Fay: The focus of this lesson is a particularly powerful verb – έχω (echo).
Chrissi: Yes, έχω (echo).
Fay: Which means…?
Chrissi: “To have.”
Fay: Is it as important in Greek as in English?
Chrissi: Sure is. Like “have” in English, έχω (echo) is an auxiliary verb in Greek. That means it’s used to form various verb tenses.
Fay: But today we are going to see one particular relation it has with nouns.
Chrissi: Yes. The verb έχω (echo) “to have” is always used with the accusative case of a noun or adjective.
Fay: Right. We haven’t mentioned the accusative case yet. Let’s remind our listeners about the cases.
Chrissi: Cases are the forms that articles, nouns, adjectives, pronouns, and participles take as they change in the language.
Fay: And the Greek cases are...
Chrissi: Nominative, genitive, accusative, and vocative.
Fay: And right now, we’re talking about the accusative.
Chrissi: It is used to answer the question “whom” or “what.”
Fay: So if I ask you Τι έχεις στην τσέπη σου (Ti echeis stin tsepi sou) “What do you have in your pocket?”, you will answer...
Chrissi: Έχω έναν αναπτήρα, ένα πακέτο χαρτομάντηλα και τα κλειδιά μου. (Echo enan anaptira, ena paketo xartomantila kai ta kleidia mou.) “I have a lighter, a packet of tissues, and my keys.”
Fay: All these are in the accusative case?
Chrissi: Yes. Ένας αναπτήρας (Enas anaptiras) is the nominative and Έναν αναπτήρα (Enan anaptira) is the accusative, for both the indefinite article and the noun.
Fay: Same with the tissues?
Chrissi: Yes. But there you can’t see that immediately because neuter gender nouns don’t change from nominative to accusative. Both nominative and accusative would be τα χαρτομάντηλα. (ta chartomantila.)
Fay: Same with the keys?
Chrissi: Right. Τα κλειδιά (Ta kleidia) for both nominative and accusative.
Fay: So when I have something, it is always in the accusative, regardless of gender or number?
Chrissi: Exactly. Έχω πυρετό (Echo pyreto) “I have a fever”, Έχω μοτοσυκλέτα (Echo motosykleta) “I have a motorcycle”, Έχω χρόνο (Echo chrono) “I have time”, Έχω φαγητό στο ψυγείο (Echo fagito sto psigeio) “I have food in the refrigerator”. All these nouns are in the accusative.
Fay: You said that neuter nouns don’t change from nominative to accusative.
Chrissi: That’s right, they don’t.
Fay: How about feminine nouns?
Chrissi: They don’t change either.
Fay: Great! And masculine ones?
Chrissi: Unfortunately, those do change. But the only change is that they drop their final -s. Masculine nouns always have a final -s in their nominative singular.
Fay: Can we hear some examples of this change?
Chrissi: Αναπτήρας (Anaptiras) “lighter” becomes αναπτήρα (anaptira), υπολογιστής (ypologistis) “computer” becomes υπολογιστή (ypologisti), ελέφαντας (elefantas) “elephant” becomes ελέφαντα (elefanta), ανεμιστήρας (anemistiras) “electric fan” becomes ανεμιστήρα (anemistira), πρόεδρος (proedros) “president” becomes πρόεδρο (proedro).
Fay: Not that hard, is it?
Chrissi: Not really, no.
Fay: And we’ve covered all this in the PDF for this lesson, haven’t we?
Chrissi: Of course! That’s why you should go and download it immediately!
Fay: And with that, we are leaving you. Get instant access to all of our language learning lessons.
Chrissi: With any subscription, instantly access our entire library of audio and video lessons.
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Chrissi: Put them on your phone or another mobile device and listen, watch, and learn anywhere.
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Chrissi: Or skip around to different levels. It’s up to you.
Fay: Instantly access them all right now at GreekPod101.com. Bye!
Chrissi: Γεια! (Geia!)

35 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Do you have a cellphone? Answer it in Greek!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 11:11 PM
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Hi Nicholas,


Καλέ doesn't have any particular meaning when used like that (as an interjection). It's just there to make the flow of speech more smooth.


It's like saying "Hey, what happened?" or "Oh my! What happened?"


I hope this helps,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Nicholas Paron
Wednesday at 11:51 PM
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what is the work kale mean as in ti egine kale vs ti egine which means what happened correct?


thank you

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 07:19 PM
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Γεια σου Λεωνίδα,


Κι εγώ έχω Huawei κινητό και είμαι πολύ ευχαριστημένη προς το παρόν.


Γεια χαρά,


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Λεωνίδας
Wednesday at 09:21 PM
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Βέβαι και έχω κινητό. Είναι ένα Huawei Nova. Δεν είναι καινούριο μοντέλο, αλλά για μένα είναι έντάξει.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 05:07 PM
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Hi Peter,


Thank you for reporting the error. It's been corrected as well as some of the wording in the notes that follow as not all feminine and neuter nouns are identical in the nominative and the accusative case. There are some exceptions such as archaic female nouns that end in the unusual for the feminine gender -ς. For example η άρκτος (nominative) - την άρκτο (accusative).


I hope that helps.


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Peter
Tuesday at 06:20 PM
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Hi,


There is a small typo in both the text above and in the lesson notes. The text is:

"A good thing for students of the Greek language is that nouns don't change much from nominative to accusative; this means that if we know a noun's nominative case (which is the basic case, usually mentioned in dictionaries), we know its nominative as well."


I believe you meant to say "...we know its accusative as well" instead of "...we know its nominative as well". 😄

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 09:55 AM
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Καλημέρα Γιαν,


Χαίρομαι που σε κάλυψα.


Να 'σαι καλά!


Στεφανία

Team GreekPod101.com

Jan S
Wednesday at 04:18 PM
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Καλημέρα Στεφανία,


σε ευχαριστώ πάρα πολύ για την εκτενής σου απάντηση. Τώρα καταλαβαίνω όλο - ελπίζω ;-)


/Γιαν

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:53 AM
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Γεια σου Jan,


Thank you for asking me this very important question!


The grammar of Manolis A. Triandaphyllidis was also the grammar I was taught as a kid in school. Back then we would be removing the final ν from the masculine τον, έναν, αυτόν etc. as well. Although his grammar is still the "Holy Bible" of Greek grammars, that specific rule about the final ν has been reviewed by the Ministry of Education since 2008.


Now, kids in school follow the grammar I'm linking below where the rule doesn't apply to the masculine words.

http://ebooks.edu.gr/modules/ebook/show.php/DSGYM-A112/621/4005,17967/

Check the green box "ΟΡΘΟΓΡΑΦΙΑ: Το τελικό ν" on chapter 2.2 (Φωνολογία) https://screencast.com/t/7gPAtfR21I


This was a very important and much needed change because the lack of ν in masculine words could confuse the reader into thinking of them as neuter words. For example:


Η Αλίκη πήγε με το ναυτικό.

(το ναυτικό = the navy, το(ν) ναυτικό = the sailor)

So did Αλίκη join the navy or did she go somewhere with the sailor? A reader could never know for sure!


Keep in mind that in oral speech, the final ν is often assimilated even in the masculine words. Here is a pronunciation lesson about that type of assimilation:

https://www.greekpod101.com/2015/04/10/ultimate-greek-pronunciation-guide-8-assimilation-part-1/


I hope this makes things clear about the final ν :)


Regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Jan S
Tuesday at 03:12 PM
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Γεια σου Στεφανία,


in the grammar section under accusative this sentence appears:

"For the masculine this rule doesn't apply and ν (n) is always used."


This statement is not in accordance with what I have been taught! I am 'supported' by one of my 'holy' books', Manolis A. Triandaphyllidis: Concise Modern Greek Grammar items, 328 and 135.


But I am not an expert. Could you clarify that statement, please.