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Vocabulary Lists Greek Phrases to Use When You're Angry
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Greek Phrases to Use When You're Angry

Ελληνικές φράσεις που μπορείς να χρησιμοποιήσεις όταν έχεις τα νεύρα σου
16 Words 24 Comments
Whatever.
Τέλος πάντων. Τέλος πάντων.
Télos pándon
Whatever.
It’s none of your business.
Να μη σε νοιάζει. Να μη σε νοιάζει.
Na mi se niázi.
It’s none of your business.
I'm upset.
Είμαι συγχυσμένη. Είμαι συγχυσμένη.
Íme sinhizméni.
I'm upset.
You're not listening to me.
Δεν ακούς τι σου λέω. Δεν ακούς τι σου λέω.
Den akús ti su léo.
You're not listening to me.
Watch your mouth.
Πρόσεχε πώς μιλάς. Πρόσεχε πώς μιλάς.
Prósehe pós milás.
Watch your mouth.
That's enough.
Αρκετά. Αρκετά.
Arketá.
That's enough.
Stop it.
Σταμάτα. Σταμάτα.
Stamáta.
Stop it.
Cut it out.
Κόφ' το. Κόφ' το.
Kóf' to.
Cut it out.
What the heck are you doing?
Τι στο καλό κάνεις; Τι στο καλό κάνεις;
Ti sto kaló kánis?
What the heck are you doing?
Who do you think you are?
Ποιος νομίζεις ότι είσαι; Ποιος νομίζεις ότι είσαι;
Pios nomízis óti íse?
Who do you think you are?
What?!
Τι;! Τι;!
Ti?!
What?!
I don’t want to talk to you.
Δεν θέλω να σου μιλήσω. Δεν θέλω να σου μιλήσω.
Den thélo na su milíso.
I don’t want to talk to you.
Are you kidding me?
Με δουλεύεις; Με δουλεύεις;
Me dulévis?
Are you kidding me?
This is so frustrating.
Αυτό είναι τόσο εκνευριστικό. Αυτό είναι τόσο εκνευριστικό.
Aftó íne tóso eknevristikó.
This is so frustrating.
Shut up.
Σκάσε. Σκάσε.
Skáse.
Shut up.
So what?
Ε και; Ε και;
E ke?
So what?
None of our words match your filter
24 Comments
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GreekPod101.comVerified
Monday at 2:57 pm
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Have you ever had to use any of these phrases before?


P.S., If you want to build your vocabulary with more positive words, be sure to check out this word list:

https://www.greekpod101.com/2016/08/07/greek-vocab-builder-56-the-top-20-words-for-positive-emotions/

GreekPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 4:12 am
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Hi Stephanie,


Depending on the context, συγχυσμένη may also mean confused. It's not a slang word, however.


I recommend you use this dictionary to see the various meanings of words:

https://bit.ly/2uj6H9E


It's better than Google😉


Cheers,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Stephanie
Monday at 7:43 pm
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Hello, thank you for the list. Is συγχυσμένη a slang? I checked google and wiki and they both translated this word to confused instead of upset. Thank you.

GreekPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 4:55 am
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Hi Dave,


Thank you for reaching out to us.


I'm Stefania and yes, I'm a real person, not a chatbot and I'm here to help :)


These vocabulary lists are not part of any lesson series or of any particular level. They are not supposed to build up. Every month we just come up with a few random topics and provide related vocabulary that could be useful for a student of Greek. Sometimes the topics we choose may be related to an important event that takes place that month, for example the Olympics. But in essence, these lists are there to provide vocabulary only. Sometimes it's single words, sometimes it's phrases or sentences.


The actual learning method can be found in our lesson library where you'll find various lesson pathways all organized into levels, audio or video lessons. You can choose your filter to find a pathway that suits your needs.


If you are starting from zero, as you mentioned, I assume you haven't learned the alphabet yet. In that case, feel free to check out this video series here:

https://www.greekpod101.com/lesson-library/greek-alphabet-made-easy-video/


This is our introduction to Greek series:

https://www.greekpod101.com/lesson-library/introduction-to-greek/


And this is our absolute beginner series:

https://www.greekpod101.com/lesson-library/conversational-greek-for-absolute-beginners/


If you want to work on your pronunciation after learning how to read, you can check out this video series:

https://www.greekpod101.com/lesson-library/ultimate-greek-pronunciation-guide/


Keep in mind that GreekPod101 is a self-learning method, so it will require memorization. There is a Premium Plus subscription that will offer you a personal tutor from which you can request assignments to reinforce what you learn so you may want to consider that.


I hope I was of help. Let me know if you have any more questions.


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

dave Morgan
Sunday at 7:12 am
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Hi Thanks for the suggestion, and sorry if I'm coming over all negative! Partly I'm not very used to this kind of communication (over the internet, I mean), and partly I'm not entirely sure whether I'm communicating with a real person or not. I think I just got a reply to a previous comment, but I'm not entirely sure - if so, thanks!

If you ARE a real person, and if you did ask if I had 'had to' use any of the phrases before, the answer is no. I'm not in Greece, and I've never been to Greece, and I'm starting from zero with learning the language

dave Morgan
Sunday at 6:20 am
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Again, a whole series of discrete phrases- Have I missed something? I understood that there would be a gradual buildup of vocabulary which would be repeated at regular intervals in such a way that they became stored in the long-term memory. Could I really have missed so much or is this just an extra throw-away selection of usable phrases without any process of reinforcement? Or are we supposed to do that memorisation work ourselves and bash these phrases into our heads without any other context? I don't mind doing that but it's not how I thought this learning method worked.

Ιάκωβος
Wednesday at 10:06 pm
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Hi Stefania,


Well, I get your point and I quite agree on that.


Kind regards,


Santiago


GreekPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 2:53 am
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Hi Santiago,


I see now. Well, I’m always in favor of using one’s name as it is in other languages and not change it. Especially if it’s very different from the original. That’s the purpose of a name, right? A specific sound assigned to you.


I would only change it if its equivalent is very similar between the languages and one wants to feel more incorporated, in a way, in Greek society. For example Alexander - Αλέξανδρος. Santiago vs Ιάκωβος sound so different that it becomes a different name. For example, if you have a child called Santiago and you suddenly start calling him out loudly on the street Ιάκωβε! Ιάκωβε! the child wouldn’t turn around to look!


I'll call you Santiago😄!


Cheers,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Ιάκωβος
Sunday at 7:06 am
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Hi Stefania,


Well, sorry for that, my actual name is Santiago, but since there are so many variants of this name with the same etymology (Jacob, James, Jacques, Giacomo, Jacopo, Ιάκωβος, Diego, Jaime, Jaume, Tiago, Yago, etc. all of them from Hebrew "Ya'akov") I sometimes adapt my name to the language that I am using or learning.


You are completely right! "Conjugal" is more formal than "marital" or "spousal" in English.


All the best,


Santiago

GreekPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 10:28 pm
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Hi James! ... or Ιάκωβος (Jacob?)


Yes, you are right😄. Conjugal can also be translated like that to be more precise. Note, however, that in Greek συζυγικός doesn't sound so formal as "conjugal". I believe the English term is less common compared to "marital" or "spousal". Am I correct?


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Ιάκωβος
Sunday at 5:28 am
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Hi there,


I think it is interesting to point out that "συζυγικός" can also be translated into English as "conjugal" (a word existing in all or almost all Romance languages). Actually, they are the exact equivalent: "conjugal" = "con-" ('with, together') + "jugum" ('yoke'); "συν-" ('with, together') + "ζυγός" ('yoke'). Therefore, the "σύζυγος", the "spouse" is etymologically someone united to another person by a yoke.


Best wishes to you all,

James