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Vocabulary Lists 15 Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
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15 Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

15 φράσεις αγάπης για την ημέρα του Αγίου Βαλεντίνου
15 Words 12 Comments
I love you.
Σ' αγαπώ. Σ' αγαπώ.
S' agapó
I love you.
You mean so much to me.
Σημαίνεις τόσα πολλά για μένα. Σημαίνεις τόσα πολλά για μένα.
Siménis tósa polá ya ména.
You mean so much to me.
Will you be my Valentine?
Θες να γίνεις ο Βαλεντίνος μου; Θες να γίνεις ο Βαλεντίνος μου;
Thes na yínis o Valentínos mu?
Will you be my Valentine?
You're so beautiful.
Είσαι τόσο όμορφος. Είσαι τόσο όμορφος.
Íse tóso ómorfos.
You're so beautiful.
I think of you as more than a friend.
Σε βλέπω σαν κάτι παραπάνω από φίλο. Σε βλέπω σαν κάτι παραπάνω από φίλο.
Se vlépo san káti parapáno apó fílo.
I think of you as more than a friend.
A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.
Εκατό καρδιές θα ήταν πολύ λίγες για να κρατήσουν όλη την αγάπη μου για σένα. Εκατό καρδιές θα ήταν πολύ λίγες για να κρατήσουν όλη την αγάπη μου για σένα.
Ekató kardiés tha ítan polí líyes ya na kratísun óli tin agápi mu ya séna.
A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.
Love is just love. It can never be explained.
Η αγάπη είναι απλώς αγάπη. Δεν μπορεί να εξηγηθεί ποτέ. Η αγάπη είναι απλώς αγάπη. Δεν μπορεί να εξηγηθεί ποτέ.
I agápi íne aplós agápi. Den borí na exiyithí poté.
Love is just love. It can never be explained.
You're so handsome.
Είσαι τόσο γοητευτικός. Είσαι τόσο γοητευτικός.
Íse tóso goiteftikós.
You're so handsome.
I've got a crush on you.
Έχω καψούρα μαζί σου. Έχω καψούρα μαζί σου.
Ého kapsúra mazí su.
I've got a crush on you.
You make me want to be a better man.
Με κάνεις να θέλω να γίνω καλύτερος άνθρωπος. Με κάνεις να θέλω να γίνω καλύτερος άνθρωπος.
Me kánis na thélo na yíno kalíteros ánthropos.
You make me want to be a better man.
Let all that you do be done in love.
Όλα όσα λέγετε και κάνετε ας γίνονται με αγάπη. Όλα όσα λέγετε και κάνετε ας γίνονται με αγάπη.
Óla ósa léyete ke kánete as yínonde me agápi.
Let all that you do be done in love.
You are my sunshine, my love.
Είσαι το φως μου, αγάπη μου. Είσαι το φως μου, αγάπη μου.
Íse to fos mu, agápi mu.
You are my sunshine, my love.
Words can't describe my love for you.
Οι λέξεις δεν μπορούν να περιγράψουν την αγάπη μου για σένα. Οι λέξεις δεν μπορούν να περιγράψουν την αγάπη μου για σένα.
I léxis den borún na perigrápsun tin agápi mu ya séna.
Words can't describe my love for you.
We were meant to be together.
Ήταν γραφτό να είμαστε μαζί. Ήταν γραφτό να είμαστε μαζί.
Ítan graftó na ímaste mazí.
We were meant to be together.
If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you're definitely in love.
Αν σκεφτόσουν κάποιον ενώ διάβαζες αυτό, τότε είσαι σίγουρα ερωτευμένος. Αν σκεφτόσουν κάποιον ενώ διάβαζες αυτό, τότε είσαι σίγουρα ερωτευμένος.
An skeftósun kápion enó diávazes aftó, tóte íse sígura erotevménos.
If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you're definitely in love.
None of our words match your filter
12 Comments
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GreekPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:28 pm
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Hey listeners! 45% of our listeners chose ‘You mean so much to me’. Do you agree with this result? What love phrase do you most want to hear this Valentine’s Day? Let us know in Greek!


P.S. Check out this Video Lesson!

Video Culture Class: Greek Holidays #24 - St. Valentine’s Day

https://www.greekpod101.com/2014/12/05/video-culture-class-greek-holidays-24-valentines-day/

GreekPod101.com
Friday at 8:43 am
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Hi Leyla,


Thank you for your comment!


Σημαίνεις τόσα πολλά για μένα remains the same regardless of the sex of the person we talk to. It would only change if you talk to more than one persons: Σημαίνετε τόσα πολλά για μένα.


You don't need to inflect τόσα πολλά because this refers to "so much" (= "so many things", plural) which is not related to a person such as an adjective (ex. beautiful man, beautiful woman).


I hope this is clearer!


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Leyla
Friday at 3:55 am
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this is a really nice list :)

When using the phrase:


Σημαίνεις τόσα πολλά για μένα.


is this the form I would be using when talking to a woman? Would it change for men to:


Σημαίνεισ τόσο πολλό για μένα

or would it stay the same? I'm still a bit unsure when I have to inflect...

GreekPod101.comVerified
Saturday at 11:05 am
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Hi GreekFareed,


Thank you for your comment.


I'm glad you are enjoying the site and I hope you'll reach your language learning goals.

If there's anything we can do to help, like answer questions and such, please leave a comment and we'll get back to you.


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

GreekFareed
Thursday at 2:29 pm
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i am beginner but its cool site to learn greek....

GreekPod101.comVerified
Monday at 3:15 pm
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Hi Stacie,


You mean "Σε βλέπω σαν κάτι παραπάνω από φίλο." ?

That's a great line that would make someone interested in you really happy!


Cheers,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

stacie
Monday at 2:26 am
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Love the think of you more as a friend line. Will be using that one.

GreekPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 2:39 am
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Hi amphiluke,


Thank you for your message.


The root is έρωτας and that comes from Eros (Έρως), the ancient Greek god of love. So, many Greek words related to love, like the participle ερωτευμένος, have the root coming from Eros. An example of that root in English is the word "erotic".


Kind regards,


Stefania

amphiluke
Wednesday at 3:18 pm
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Thank you for all your help, Stefania. I know everyone really appreciates it.

Also I was wondering why the last example above suddenly uses the root eros for love.

Best regards,

Amphiluke

amphiluke
Wednesday at 3:08 pm
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I knew she played with Greek words and so I tried to say that I liked her. Her reaction was embarrassment and she ignored me. But I'm sure she understood. I got it from the conversation between Jesus and Peter. Jesus asks Peter, agapas me; and Peter responds, philo se. So Jesus asks again, agapas me; So Peter responds again you know that philo se. Then Jesus asks the third time, phileis me; So that distresses Peter and he says you know everything, you know that philo se. There could be many reasons why they are using the two different verbs and it is very poignant. But I learned that agapo is a decisive committed love and caring about someone's welfare - like Americans usage of "Tough Love". But philo is more an emotional heartfelt affection for someone that can grow into agapo. It may be that Peter didn't feel worthy at this point after denying Jesus three times to use the more mature verb. But Jesus is telling him that that is what he wants: a decisive, mature, committed love. So I was wondering if that difference was carried over from ancient to modern usage.

GreekPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 4:25 am
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Hi amphiluke,


Thank you for your question.


You were talking to her in ancient Greek (φιλέω σε), so she probably got a bit confused (in modern Greek that sounds weird, almost like "I, you kiss" because of the similar sounding modern Greek verb "φιλώ"). Unless of course she is a Greek philologist, so she would know that the verb means "to like, to love" actually.


A Greek listener will simply not understand this or will misinterpret it for the reason I described above, because ancient Greek is a language we never spoke and some just study it at school.


To make things simple, if you want to say to someone that you love her, use "σ' αγαπώ" depending on the voice tone or the relationship between you this works just like the English "I love you" (applies to friends, family, partners). If you want to say "I like you", say "μου αρέσεις" (again this works just like English).


Out of curiosity, what was her reaction to "φιλέω σε" and who told you to use it?


If you have any questions related to Greek, please leave a comment! I will be glad to help.


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com