Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to GreekPod101.com. This is Upper Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 16 -This Greek Honey Will Leave a Bitter Taste In Your Mouth! Eric here.
Chrissi: Γεια σας. I'm Chrissi.
Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn more categories of irregular verbs. The conversation takes place in the buffet line inside the crew mess of a cruise ship.
Chrissi: It's between Katerina and Eva.
Eric: The speakers are colleagues and friends, so they’ll be using informal Greek. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Εύα: Τι θα πάρεις;
Κατερίνα: Τι να πάρω; Πάλι τα ίδια έχει ο μπουφές. Ρύζι σκέτο, κοτόπουλο κάρι και μουσακά.
: Ό,τι δηλαδή είχαμε πριν δύο μέρες. Δεν μπορώ να καταλάβω γιατί δεν υπάρχει ποικιλία. Τους επιβάτες επάνω τους καλοταΐζουν. Εμάς εδώ κάτω...
Εύα: Έλα κουνήσου, περιμένουνε από πίσω. Διάλεξε, μουσακά ή κάρι;
Κατερίνα: Χμμ... άντε, θα φάω μουσακά σήμερα... και πάλι!
Εύα: Πάντως είναι αλήθεια, τώρα τελευταία η ποικιλία του φαγητού για το πλήρωμα δεν είναι πολύ πλούσια.
Κατερίνα: Δεν μπορούμε να το αναφέρουμε αυτό κάπου; Να στείλουμε ένα γράμμα στην εταιρεία; Τις προάλλες το μέλι για το πρωινό δεν ήταν μέλι.
Εύα: Τι εννοείς;
Κατερίνα: Εννοώ ότι οι αυτές οι μικρές ατομικές συσκευασίες μελιού που δίνουν στο πρωινό είχαν επάνω λίστα με συστατικά.
: Και έλεγε «60% μέλι θυμαρίσιο, 40% σιρόπι γλυκόζης». Αν είναι δυνατόν!
Εύα: Νοθευμένο μέλι δηλαδή μας δίνουν; Α, δεν πάμε καλά!
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Eva: What are you going to have?
Katerina: What can I have? The buffet has the same stuff again. Plain white rice, chicken curry, and moussaka.
: Whatever we had two days ago, basically. I can't understand why there's no variety. The passengers upstairs are being fed well. While we down here...
Eva: Come on, move, the people behind are waiting. Choose, moussaka or curry?
Katerina: Hmm... OK, I'll have moussaka today... again!
Eva: It is true though, lately the variety of the food for the crew has not been so great.
Katerina: Can't we report this somewhere? Like send a letter to the company? The other day the honey on breakfast was not honey.
Eva: What do you mean?
Katerina: I mean that these little single-serving packets of honey that they give during breakfast had a list with ingredients on them.
: And it said "60% thyme honey, 40% glucose syrup". Unbelievable!
Eva: So they are giving us adulterated honey? This is not right!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Chrissi, I know that Greek honey is considered to be some of the finest in the world, with a top rank in the world market.
Chrissi: That's true. Greek honey is excellent because of the long periods of sunshine, the temperate climate, and the rich variety of Greek flora, which includes over 850 species found nowhere else in the world!
Eric: Are there different kinds of honey?
Chrissi: Many actually. The most common is thyme honey or, in Greek, θυμαρίσιο. It has a thick consistency and a deep amber color. Other exceptional varieties include the honey produced from flowers such as orange, Mediterranean pink heather and forest honey, which is made from coniferous trees such as fir and pine.
Eric: I’ve never heard of forest honey before!
Chrissi: Forest honey has a very thick consistency, dark color, and an earthy flavor. It’s also rich in minerals such as potassium, iron, and magnesium, and it has a much lower sugar content than flower honey.
Eric: Which one is your favorite?
Chrissi: Personally, I like thyme honey, but I only eat it in the summer since cold winter temperatures can make it difficult to pour on bread. The rest of the year, I use the more fluid flower honey instead.
Eric: Very convenient! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Chrissi: ρύζι [natural native speed]
Eric: rice
Chrissi: ρύζι [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: ρύζι [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: ποικιλία [natural native speed]
Eric: variety, platter with a variety of food to accompany mainly ouzo
Chrissi: ποικιλία [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: ποικιλία [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: καλοταΐζω [natural native speed]
Eric: to feed well in terms of quality and quantity
Chrissi: καλοταΐζω [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: καλοταΐζω [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: αναφέρω [natural native speed]
Eric: to mention, to refer, to report
Chrissi: αναφέρω [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: αναφέρω [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: προάλλες [natural native speed]
Eric: the other day
Chrissi: προάλλες [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: προάλλες [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: ατομικός [natural native speed]
Eric: atomic, individual, single
Chrissi: ατομικός [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: ατομικός [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: θυμαρίσιος [natural native speed]
Eric: of or related to thyme
Chrissi: θυμαρίσιος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: θυμαρίσιος [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: δυνατός [natural native speed]
Eric: strong, forceful, loud, high, possible, doable, feasible
Chrissi: δυνατός [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: δυνατός [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Chrissi: νοθευμένος [natural native speed]
Eric: impure, adulterated
Chrissi: νοθευμένος [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: νοθευμένος [natural native speed]
Eric: And last...
Chrissi: πηγαίνω [natural native speed]
Eric: to go, to lead, to match
Chrissi: πηγαίνω [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chrissi: πηγαίνω [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Chrissi: ...τις προάλλες.
Eric: Meaning “the other day.” Just like in English, you can use this phrase to refer to a very recent, but undefined moment in time.
Chrissi: Listeners, please be careful. Don't try to change this phrase to singular or to a different case. No matter how it is used in a sentence, it needs to remain τις προάλλες.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Chrissi: Sure. For example, you can say: Τις προάλλες συνάντησα έναν παλιό μου καθηγητή στον δρόμο.
Eric: “The other day I bumped into an old professor of mine on the street.” Okay, what's the next phrase?
Chrissi: Αν είναι δυνατόν!
Eric: Which means “Unbelievable!” or “Is this for real?” Let's break it down.
Chrissi: The expression Αν είναι δυνατόν! consists of αν, meaning “if,” then είναι, meaning “it is”, and the adjective δυνατός. Here δυνατός means “possible” in English. All together it literally means “If it is possible!”, but this is translated as “Unbelievable!” or “Is this for real?”
Eric: Greeks use this phrase in any situation either to complain directly to someone or to describe a shocking situation.
Chrissi: Right. But please be careful when you direct this word at another person. It is a strong complaint and that will have consequences, as you can guess!
Eric: Can we have an example using this phrase?
Chrissi: Sure. Έκαψε τα δάχτυλά του όταν έμαθε ότι τον κυνηγούσε η αστυνομία για να μην ταυτοποιήσουν τα αποτυπώματά του. Αν είναι δυνατόν!
Eric: This means: “He burned his fingers when he found out that the police were after him, so that they wouldn't identify his fingerprints. Unbelievable!” Okay, what's the last phrase?
Chrissi: Δεν πάμε καλά!
Eric: Which means “This is not right! This is crazy or insane!”
Chrissi: Δεν πάμε καλά! consists of the verb πηγαίνω, meaning “to go,” in the first person plural form and negated, plus the adverb καλά meaning “well.”
Eric: So all together, it literally means “We are not going well!”
Chrissi: Although there's a “we” here, the notion is that something in general is not right on a mental level. In this way, it's like the English “This is crazy!” or “This is insane!”
Eric: You can use this phrase to describe any situation in both formal and informal conversations, and you can also adapt this phrase in forms of other persons too, if you want to refer to someone specific.
Chrissi: Right. But please avoid saying this directly to someone. For example: Δεν πας καλά! It will be as if you're calling that person crazy.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Chrissi: Sure. For example: Δεν πάμε καλά! Διάβασε να δεις τι λέει το άρθρο αυτό στην εφημερίδα.
Eric: Which means: “This is crazy! Check out what this article says in the newspaper.” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In a previous lesson we introduced you to the first four categories of Greek irregular verbs. In this lesson we’ll continue with the next three. Ok. Let’s start with the 5th category.
Chrissi: The 5th category includes verbs that end in -λλω with double λ. These verbs form their aorist stem by losing one λ and by sometimes changing the stem vowel of the present tense.
Eric: Verbs from the 5th category form an asigmatic aorist. Can you give us some examples of these verbs?
Chrissi: For example, ψάλλω, “to chant” or, for instance, verbs that use the compound -αγγέλλω or -βάλλω in combination with a prefix such as a preposition, for example αναγγέλλω, meaning to “announce.”
Eric: Let's see how this verb changes in different tenses. The active voice aorist tense is…
Chrissi: ...ανάγγειλα or ανήγγειλα...
Eric: The passive voice aorist tense is...
Chrissi: ...αναγγέλθηκα...
Eric: ...and the passive voice perfect tense participle is...
Chrissi: ...αναγγελμένος.
Eric: Great. Now let's move to the 6th category.
Chrissi: This category includes verbs that end in -λνω and -ρνω. These verbs form their aorist stem by losing the ν (Ν) and by often changing the stem vowel of the present tense.
Eric: Verbs from the 6th category form an asigmatic aorist. Let's see some examples of verbs that belong in this category.
Chrissi: For example γδέρνω, meaning “to skin, to excoriate”, δέρνω, meaning “to beat, to spank” and φέρνω, meaning “to bring.”
Eric: Now let's take the last one and see how it can change in the same tenses that we mentioned above.
Chrissi: Ok. So φέρνω in the active voice aorist tense will become έφερα, in the passive voice aorist tense φέρθηκα and in the passive voice perfect tense participle φερμένος.
Eric: Great! Now our last category for this lesson is the 7th category.
Chrissi: The 7th category includes some verbs ending in -αίνω with α-ι, which form their aorist stem by losing the -αιν- part of the present tense.
Eric: These verbs form an asigmatic aorist.
Chrissi: Right. Here we find verbs such as μαθαίνω, “to learn, to find out,” καταλαβαίνω, “to understand” and λαβαίνω or λαμβάνω, “to receive, to get.”
Eric: Listeners, you can find detailed information about these verbs in the lesson notes.
Chrissi: Just one more thing. As you may remember, we mentioned -αίνω ending verbs again in the previous lesson and specifically in category 4.
Eric: So make sure you review the verbs from categories 4 and 7, so you won't confuse them.
Chrissi: Actually, -αίνω ending verbs are very peculiar, so we will be examining them again in one of our next lessons.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Chrissi: Γεια χαρά!

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