Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Iro: Γεια σας, εγώ είμαι η Ηρώ
Judith: Judith here. Upper Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 9 - Beggars.
Iro: Hi, my name is Iro and I'm joined here by Judith.
Judith: Hello everyone and welcome back to GreekPod101.com.
Iro: What are we learning today?
Judith: In this lesson you will learn how to deal with an intruder.
Iro: This conversation takes place at a Greek Ταβέρνα.
Judith: The conversation is between Rhea and Alexis, a beggar and the waiter.
Iro: Rhea and Alexis are siblings, therefore they will be speaking informal Greek to each other but formal Greek to the waiter.
Judith: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
N: Ο Αλέξης και η Ρέα είναι σε μία ταβέρνα και τρώνε. Έρχεται ένας ζητιάνος μεθυσμένος.
N: Η Ρέα του δίνει πενήντα λεπτά αλλά αυτός επιμένει.
Α: Θέλεις λίγη μπίρα ακόμα;
Ρ: Όχι, είμαι εντάξει.
Ζ: Σας παρακαλώ, δώστε μου κάτι για να φάω κι εγώ.
Α: Δεν έχουμε.
Ζ: Έλα κύριε, σε παρακαλώ.
Ρ: Ορίστε, πενήντα λεπτά.
Ζ: Δώστε μου κάτι ακόμα!
Α: Έλα, έλα, πάρε τα πενήντα λεπτά και δρόμο!
Ζ: Δώσε μου εσύ κυρία είκοσι λεπτά να πάρω μια μπιρίτσα.
Ρ: Άσε με ήσυχη!
Σερβιτόρος: Πάλι εδώ εσύ; Φύγε, ενοχλείς τους πελάτες!
Ζ: Καλά, δεν είπαμε και τίποτα. Φεύγω.
Σερβιτόρος: Με συγχωρείτε για αυτό. Θέλετε ένα φρούτο;
Α: Όχι, ευχαριστούμε. Το λογαριασμό παρακαλώ.
Σ: Αμέσως.
Judith: Now one time slowly.
N: Ο Αλέξης και η Ρέα είναι σε μία ταβέρνα και τρώνε. Έρχεται ένας ζητιάνος μεθυσμένος.
N: Η Ρέα του δίνει πενήντα λεπτά αλλά αυτός επιμένει.
Α: Θέλεις λίγη μπίρα ακόμα;
Ρ: Όχι, είμαι εντάξει.
Ζ: Σας παρακαλώ, δώστε μου κάτι για να φάω κι εγώ.
Α: Δεν έχουμε.
Ζ: Έλα κύριε, σε παρακαλώ.
Ρ: Ορίστε, πενήντα λεπτά.
Ζ: Δώστε μου κάτι ακόμα!
Α: Έλα, έλα, πάρε τα πενήντα λεπτά και δρόμο!
Ζ: Δώσε μου εσύ κυρία είκοσι λεπτά να πάρω μια μπιρίτσα.
Ρ: Άσε με ήσυχη!
Σερβιτόρος: Πάλι εδώ εσύ; Φύγε, ενοχλείς τους πελάτες!
Ζ: Καλά, δεν είπαμε και τίποτα. Φεύγω.
Σερβιτόρος: Με συγχωρείτε για αυτό. Θέλετε ένα φρούτο;
Α: Όχι, ευχαριστούμε. Το λογαριασμό παρακαλώ.
Σ: Αμέσως.
Judith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
N: Ο Αλέξης και η Ρέα είναι σε μία ταβέρνα και τρώνε. Έρχεται ένας ζητιάνος μεθυσμένος.
N: Alexis and Rea are at a café and are eating. A drunk beggar comes.
N: Η Ρέα του δίνει πενήντα λεπτά αλλά αυτός επιμένει.
N: Rea gives him fifty cents, but he persists.
Α: Θέλεις λίγη μπίρα ακόμα;
A: Do you want a little more beer?
Ρ: Όχι, είμαι εντάξει.
R: No, I'm okay.
Ζ: Σας παρακαλώ, δώστε μου κάτι για να φάω κι εγώ.
B: Please give me something so that I can eat too.
Α: Δεν έχουμε.
A: We don't have [anything].
Ζ: Έλα κύριε, σε παρακαλώ.
B: Come on, sir, please.
Ρ: Ορίστε, πενήντα λεπτά.
R: Here you are, fifty cents.
Ζ: Δώστε μου κάτι ακόμα!
B: Give me something else!
Α: Έλα, έλα, πάρε τα πενήντα λεπτά και δρόμο!
A: Come, come, take the fifty cents and get out [street]!
Ζ: Δώσε μου εσύ κυρία είκοσι λεπτά να πάρω μια μπιρίτσα.
B: You, lady, give me twenty cents so that I can get a little beer.
Ρ: Άσε με ήσυχη!
R: Leave me alone!
Σερβιτόρος: Πάλι εδώ εσύ; Φύγε, ενοχλείς τους πελάτες!
Waiter: You here again? Go away, you're bothering the customers!
Ζ: Καλά, δεν είπαμε και τίποτα. Φεύγω.
B: Fine, I didn't say anything. I'm leaving.
Σερβιτόρος: Με συγχωρείτε για αυτό. Θέλετε ένα φρούτο;
Waiter: Forgive me for that. Do you want a fruit?
Α: Όχι, ευχαριστούμε. Το λογαριασμό παρακαλώ.
A: No, thank you. The bill, please.
Σ: Αμέσως.
W: Right away.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Judith: Okay, what can you say about beggars in Greece?
Iro: On the streets of big cities, especially downtown, there are many people asking for money. Most of them are gypsies or immigrants who sells handkerchiefs, flowers, lighters, pirated CDs of the latest hits, and other cheap objects.
Judith: I imagine there are also musicians and drug addicts. In most intersections in Athens, there are people who offer to wash your car windows for a few cents.
Iro: Sometimes saying no is not enough because these people, although they are not dangerous, they can be very persistent.
Judith: So what would I tell them if I want them to go away.
Iro: Well, the best way is to say no and to walk or drive away. Other expressions are άσε με.
Judith: Literally, “leave me”.
Iro: And φύγε.
Judith: “Go away”. Let’s look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Judith: The first word we'll look at is…
Iro: Ζητιάνος
Judith: Beggar.
Iro: Ζητιάνος
Judith: Next.
Iro: Μεθυσμένος
Judith: Drunk.
Iro: Μεθυσμένος
Judith: Next.
Iro: Λεπτά
Judith: Cents.
Iro: Λεπτά
Judith: Next.
Iro: Επιμένω
Judith: To insist or persist.
Iro: Επιμένω
Judith: Next.
Iro: Μπιρίτσα
Judith: Little beer,
Iro: Μπιρίτσα
Judith: Next.
Iro: Άσε
Judith: “Let” or “leave”.
Iro: Άσε
Judith: Next.
Iro: Αφήνω
Judith: “To let” or “to leave”.
Iro: Ενοχλώ
Judith: Next.
Iro: To bother.
Iro: Ενοχλώ
Judith: Next.
Iro: Πελάτης
Judith: “Client” or “customer”.
Iro: Πελάτης
Judith: Next.
Iro: Φρούτο
Judith: Fruit.
Iro: Φρούτο
Judith: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Iro: The first word we'll look at is φύγω.
Judith: This is the irregular Aorist stem for φεύγω. Apart from that, there are no new Aorist stems to learn this time.
Iro: Είπαμε is “we said”. This is another irregular form of the verb λέω.
Judith: To say.
Iro: And it’s the past tense. We’ll study the past tense soon.

Lesson focus

Judith: The focus of this lesson is politeness. Today’s dialogue featured one person speaking subserviently, that is the beggar, one person using normal politeness, that is the waiter, and two people speaking impolitely, Alexis and Rhea when addressing the beggar. When you listen to the dialogue again, pay particular attention to how each of them speaks in order to give this impression.
Iro: One thing is that obviously you don’t have to use the polite verb forms when your goal is to speak impolitely. This is why Alexis uses the singular imperative when he says Πάρε τα πενήντα λεπτά και δρόμο.
Judith: Take the 50 cents and leave.
Iro: Note that he also doesn’t use παρακαλώ.
Judith: Please.
Iro: Or κύριε.
Judith: Sir.
Iro: Instead, he even sharpens the command by saying έλα έλα expressing his impatience with the man.
Judith: By contrast, the beggar is so polite as to sound subservient. He uses the polite plural even though he’s only addressing one person. He also calls Alex κύριε and Rhea κυρία and he says σας παρακαλώ instead of simply παρακαλώ. His intonation also reflects his inferior position. Let’s have an example, a sentence, say a request for 1 euro spoken by people in different positions. Let’s start with a beggar speaking very polite Greek.
Iro: Σας παρακαλώ, δώστε μου ένα ευρώ.
Judith: Moving on to just merely polite, like a waiter requesting the payment.
Iro: Ένα ευρώ παρακαλώ.
Judith: A friend using informal language.
Iro: Μήπως έχεις ένα ευρώ;
Judith: And impolite, like maybe a thug.
Iro: Δωσ΄μου ένα ευρώ.

Outro

Judith: Be sure to choose the right level of politeness when you speak. That just about does it for today.
Iro: Attention premium members, have you used the Grammar Bank?
Judith: The Grammar Bank is a one-stop collection of detailed write-ups on Greek grammar.
Iro: This is a must-have tool for mastering Greek.
Judith: Learn the basic formations.
Iro: Read simple sentences.
Judith: And study teacher tips which will really help you master the construction of the Greek langage.
Iro: Go to the Resource Materials section on GreekPod101.com and click Grammar Bank.
Judith: Okay, see you next week.
Iro: Γεία σας.

24 Comments

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 08:38 PM
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Hi Petra!


When I study a language myself, I also sometimes wonder why some things work the way they work and ask for deeper explanations that books usually don't say. I try my best to give such deeper explanations when it comes to explaining something in Greek so I hope those explanations are helpful!


All the best,


Stefania


Team GreekPod101.com

Petra Zegerius
Monday at 11:29 PM
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Γεια σου Στεφανία!


Σ'ευχαριστώ. Ναι, τώρα καταλαβαίνω. I am very happy with your clear explanation. I love understanding why something is the way it is. It helps me a lot.


Αντίο από Αμστερντάμ!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 01:59 AM
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Γεια σου Πέτρα,


Πολύ καλή ερώτηση! Θα σου εξηγήσω στα αγγλικά γιατί μπορεί να είναι λίγο δύσκολο να καταλάβεις όλα όσα θα σου γράψω.


First of all, word order in Greek is quite flexible in general, so whether you put an adjective or a passive participle (such as μεθυσμένος) in front or after a noun depends on the flow of speech and whether you want to put emphasis on a specific element of it.


Now in this case, if we didn't have a passive participle and we had a normal adjective, it would sound more natural indeed to place it before the noun, ex. ένας φτωχός ζητιάνος. But because we have a passive participle and passive participles come from a verb indicating that something HAS BEEN AFFECTED by the action of the verb, saying ζητιάνος μεθυσμένος doesn't feel unnatural. It's like saying ένας ζητιάνος που είχε μεθύσει ("a beggar that had gotten drunk") OR ένας ζητιάνος που είναι μεθυσμένος (a beggar that is drunk). So the existing word order is OK with the passive participle functioning more like a specification or a clarification of the characteristics of beggar rather than defining his characteristics up front like an adjective would do before a noun.


I hope this is a bit clearer now!


All the best,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Πετρα
Wednesday at 01:29 AM
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Γεια! Γιατί υπάρχει ζητιάνος μεθυσμένος (beggar drunk) και όχι μεθυσμένος ζητιάνος? Δεν καταλαβαίνω. Ευχαριστώ πολύ για την απάντηση σου!

Πετρα

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:02 PM
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Hi Lea,


I apologize if you think I missed a comment of yours. Could you please indicate what your first comment is because I don't see it in the comments section?


The dialogues are indeed fictional (the lesson author made them up, there's no doubt about it) and these expressions are indeed impolite which is the whole point of the lesson.


As stated before, we have received this feedback from you and others and we'll use it to produce better lessons in the future.


If there's anything else I can help you with either Greek-related or website-related, don't hesitate to let me know. I'm here to help.


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Lea again..
Monday at 11:47 PM
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I live in Athens and I see poor people everyday. Do I really have to state that they are not drunk and that they have families and that THEIR life is the frustrating situation?

Lea (AGAIN)
Monday at 11:45 PM
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Really good try ignoring my first comment, just as well as you ignore the fact that nothing ever is just "a fictional dialogue" as you want to call it. Also nobody here complained that the phrases you teach were of poor value. It is the message that you send that has poor value. And by the way: φιγε and δρόμο are not very polite as you would like them to be.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:52 PM
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Hello Alice,


Thank you for contacting us.


As it has been stated before, this is a fictional dialogue that shows how being impolite in Greek could be like. Regardless of the topic and whether some people find it offensive or not, the goal is to benefit from it linguistically.


To make my point, I'll give an example. As a woman myself, if I were not Greek and if I would be studying Greek to travel to Greece for vacations, I would personally want to know certain impolite (but not vulgar) expressions seen in this lesson such as "Άσε με ήσυχη!", "Φύγε!", or "Δρόμο!" in case I would ever have to deal with an uncomfortable situation such as someone harassing me on the street at night, for example. I have been in this situation before as a traveler in Europe (I won't mention which country) and back then I just didn't know what to say because I didn't know the local language well enough. So from my personal point of view, I think this lesson could be useful, leaving the specific situation aside which is not the main point.


Since you touched the subject of educational responsibility though, I think it is important to have language resources that prepare you for a variety of very real positive or negative situations that one could potentially experience.


If you still find this lesson of poor value to you, you can simply skip it. We do appreciate your feedback though as this will make us create better lessons in the future.


Kind regards,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Alice
Monday at 08:58 PM
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The same as Maria Constantine and Beate, me too I was upset when I listened to this lesson.

I am a language teacher as well, I find your greek lessons very well made but what you use as a subject really matters, text is not just a pretext to talk about some grammar rule.

I don't think that being bothered by beggars is a cultural issue, I guess the same episode could have happened in every corner of the world, unfortunately, and it bothers me to know that dealing with the life of unlucky people in need could be considered frustrating.

Being a training agency you do have an educational responsability.

I hope not to find this kind of embarassing texts anymore in this course.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 11:41 PM
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Hi Stephen,


Thank you for your comment. I'm glad you can see the linguistic value of this lesson👍.


All the best,


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com