Dialogue

Vocabulary

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GreekPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Taxis in Athens are yellow, in Thessaloniki dark blue and in Patras red, so better look for the sign "taxi"!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 09:30 PM
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Hello Jan S,


Thank you for your message. Wow that's long ???


a) Θα πάω στην Σκόπελο αυτό το καλοκαίρι. // b) Θα πάω στο νησί της Σκοπέλου αυτό το καλοκαίρι.

Both correct. As in English "the island of" can be omitted. a) Proper nouns like "Σκόπελος" are conjugated. In b) you need the article before the proper noun.

c) Θα ήθελα έναν Μύθο, παρακαλώ. // d) Θα ήθελα μία μπίρα Μύθος, παρακαλώ.

Actually and grammaticaly, I think, the second sentence is right. Μύθος is a brand name, so not conjugated. However Μύθος is a greek noun meaning myth, and is conjugated. So, in everyday life people conjugate also the beer's name.


e) Έιδα τον φίλο μου τον Γιάννη χτες. // f) Έιδα τον φίλο μου Γιάννη χτες. (*) // g) Έιδα τον φίλο μου Γιάννης χτες. (*) // h) Έίδα τον Γιάννη χτες.

The g), as you said, is wrong. Γιάννης is a Greek first name and is conjugated. That means that f) where article is omitted is ok, as far as Γιάννης->Γιάννη


i) Η βανέτα του ξενοδοχείου ‘Τα Νησιά’ πήρε τις βαλίτσες. // j) Πήγαμε στο σπίτι της γειτόνισσάς μας, της Σουμέλας, και // k) Αυτό το σπιτάκι είναι του φίλου μου, του Νίκου.

In i) "Τα Νησιά" is like in d) "Μύθος". Not conjugated as it's the name of the hotel, like brand name.

j) and k) are like e) and f). That means that articles before the proper names could also be omitted.


Let us know, if you have any other question.


All the best,

Nektarios

Team GreekPod101.com

Jan S
Sunday at 04:46 PM
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Hello again!


Thank you very much for the answer! It made me think and I realized that I have some problems concerned when to conjugate names.


Below I have listed a few sentences - many from books, a few from teachers and 4 made by me (marked *). Please, do not focus on the direct 1:1 translation, but more on whether the Greek sentences are correct or not.


This summer I will go to (the island (of)) Skopelos

a) Θα πάω στην Σκόπελο αυτό το καλοκαίρι. (*)

b) Θα πάω στο νησί (της) Σκοπέλου αυτό το καλοκαίρι. (*)


Sentence b) follows the example with Larisa Station


Can I have a (beer) Mythos, please

c) Θα ήθελα έναν Μύθο, παρακαλώ.

d) Θα ήθελα μία μπίρα Μύθος, παρακαλώ.


In d) 'μία μπίρα' is the object. Why is Μύθος (object predicate?) not conjugated here?


I saw (my friend) Giannis yesterday.

e) 'Ειδα τον φίλο μου τον Γιάννη χτες.

f) 'Ειδα τον φίλο μου Γιάννη χτες. (*)

g) 'Ειδα τον φίλο μου Γιάννης χτες. (*)

h) 'Ειδα τον Γιάννη χτες.


I believe f) and g) to be wrong.


i) Η βανέτα του ξενοδοχείου 'Τα Νησιά' πήρε τις βαλίτσες.

j) Πήγαμε στο σπίτι της γειτόνισσάς μας, της Σουμέλας, και .....

k) Αυτό το σπιτάκι είναι του φίλου μου, του Νίκου.


In i) 'Τα Νησιά' is not conjugated, but in j) and k) the names of the persons are. Which rules apply here?


If this message is to 'massive' to answer in this blog, please focus on d, i, j and k.


I have Premium subscription (currently at Beginner, lesson 12). Are the any lessons dealing with this subject?


Have a nice day!

GreekPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 04:31 PM
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Hello Jan S,


Thank you for your message.


Actually there is a mistake, and we apologize for the inconvinience, but it's the opposite of what you mentioned.

The correct name of station is " Σταθμός Λαρίσης". But let me first explain why the final ς is there.

Actually in english you can say "Larisa station or station of Larisa". In greek, respectively, you need the genitive form of "Λάρισα", which is "Λάρισας or Λαρίσης".

for example Θεσσαλονίκη (Thessaloniki) -> Σταθμός Θεσσαλονίκης (Station of Thessaloniki)

Therefore, the lesson notes are correct but in the audio file, the final ς is read too weakly, that seems mistakenly it's omitted.


Let us know, if you have any other question.


All the best,

Nektarios

Team GreekPod101.com

Jan S
Thursday at 06:14 PM
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Hi, the lesson notes has a "beginner's" error - I think ;-):

1. Για σταθμό Λαρίσης.

2. Θα ήθελα να πάω στον σταθμό Λαρίσης.

As far as I know Λαρίσης should be Λαρίση here (sorry, I don't know the proper English grammar terms) and many others places in the notes. In the MP3 file the final ς is correctly omitted.


Please correct me if I am wrong!


Γεια σας.

GreekPod101.com Verified
Friday at 12:50 PM
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Hi Bibiana,


...I think you will:grin:. You know harder stuff than this!


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Bibiana
Thursday at 03:45 AM
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Oh my God... this I will never learn I think :D

GreekPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:55 AM
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Hi Bibiana,


We use the present tense because we mean "Can I be talking to you in the singular?" as in "always" or "continuously." I'm not going to talk in the singular once and then not anymore. If I get the permission, it's for life, so it's a continuous thing.:wink:


Stefania

Team GreekPod101.com

Bibiana
Monday at 11:36 PM
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"Μπορώ να σας μιλάω στον ενικό;" - in this sentence why didnt you use "μιλήσω"? Its happening now... :open_mouth: now Im confused...

GreekPod101.com Verified
Friday at 03:27 PM
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Hi Jacek,


Informal speech between two strangers can happen in Greece. It's not uncommon. For example you can talk to a taxi driver in singular if:

1) You have similar age (young-young, old-old)

2) If he/she is much younger than you

3) If you are talking to a very very old person (obviously not a taxi driver in this case)


When this happens, and of course if the voice tone is not rude, it shows that you are treating this person friendly and not formally, it's like you are seeing him or her as a person of an equal status or seniority.


In the 3rd case that I mentioned, when talking to a very very old person, usually people use the expression "γιαγιάκα" or "παππούλη". It just shows affection and kindness. Perhaps because when people reach this age, it's like they are children again, needing attention and care. For example if you see a very senior citizen trying to cross the street but is having a stick and finds it hard to go for it, you can approach that person and say:


Γιαγιάκα/παππούλη, να σε βοηθήσω να περάσεις τον δρόμο; Hey Granny/Granpa, can I help you cross the street?


In the 2nd case I can think of my father as an example. When he would talk to someone even a bit younger, a taxi driver for example, he would say: Ε πατρίδα! Πάω Πειραιά! (In Greece you always shout your destination to the taxi driver as he slows down and approaches. If he is going that way, he can pick you up, otherwise he will just drive past you!).

>>Here the term "πατρίδα" (motherland) is used to actually address someone and it's an ice-breaker. Perhaps this is due to the fact that my father was a sailor when he was young, so meeting Greeks abroad would be something exciting enough to make them call each other "πατρίδα". I hear this from men mostly and not just my dad. Another substitute for "πατρίδα"+informal speech (which is only used between Greeks) would be "φιλαράκι"+informal speech.


In your case (being non Greek), I suggest you stick to formal speech at first, unless someone talks to you back in singular or you see that person being very friendly to you. To help you get an idea, if I personally would meet you right now, if you were not past 50 years old approximately (I am 29), I would talk to you in singular because we have been having communication for a while :smile:


If you have doubts and you don't know how to speak, you can use this phrase:

Μου επιτρέπετε να σας μιλάω στον ενικό;

Do you allow me to talk to you in singular?

or

Μπορώ να σας μιλάω στον ενικό;

Can I talk to you in singular?


This will solve your doubt 100% and it will impress others with how polite you are for asking:wink:


Γεια σου!


Stefania,

Team GreekPod101.com

Jacek
Thursday at 05:45 PM
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Hello,

is it common in Greece to speak to the taxi-driver directly μπορείς not formally μπορείτε ?

I know in English it doesn't matter, but in Greek (also in Polish) it's a big difference.